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Cymbel

Acquiring Items

58 posts in this topic

Ha if you were to ask me I would say about 384 for 24 bolter bolts, 50 for lodging, food and drink, 200 for minor gear, and 50 extra. That gives about 700 thrones :)

 

But seriously, about 200 is ok for an avarage acolyte. That way, he still cries, when firing his bolter.

 

Personally I wouldn't be expecting starting Acolytes to have a bolter unless they are playing a Sister of Battle - and even then I'd be dubiious about allowing it.

 

200 Thrones seems about right though - of course with no prices for DH2's armoury you could give them millions and then tell them its only worth 1 Influence :)

 

For those of you (like me) who like using Thrones I found a suppliament ages ago on these forums called "Macharian Handbook". It comes in two versions, one of weapons and one for gear and covers the vast majority of the weapons and equipment from DH1 and RT - including Throne prices for them. If I every run DH2 I will probably be using these books to replace the armoury.

 

If I can find a link in the DH1 forums I will post it here.

 

Regards

 

Surak

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I usually give my players a stipend. I hate using influence for everything. I let them buy things with influence pre-mission so it represents acquiring things using The Vast Resources of the Inquisition . After that they get thrones to spend on mission. However I tend to make it clear they can't keep what is requisitioned after missions, and bought gear is often returned as well. Once player get the hang of this (the Big I will give them special stuff for each mission too) it actually keeps the power creep in check really nicely, while letting them play with the big toys when appropriate.

The got a bit thrift happy once too, so I gave them an audit from a really anal adept. "keep your receipts please, my lords..."

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Only problem with the handbook is you often have to flat out 'ban' a few weapons which are just straight up better versions of the regular things. Some items, like the Volg Meat Hammer are just great for adding flavour to a character though

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The way I tend to use the handbook is as a GM-side aid only, my players don't get to see the vast lists of stuff - they get the printout of a selection of those guns that the store they are in happens to stock, it also allows me to to keep generic stock lists and stock lists for traders that the group keep going back to. All in all its a little work on my part pre-session for what turns out to be a quite subtle way of giving the setting depth.

 

I do find that giving players too much access to the armoury chapters of books tends to generate a long list of shiny's that the player now simply must have, and my solution to this is very simple. If they want some sort of Uber-weapon that will make their character the most powerful thing since te emperor then I will make them work for it, I will make them chase rumours of it, when they eventually find a trader who has it (assuming I didn't like it so much I gave it to a major NPC) I will make them pay through the nose in Thrones for it, and once they've done all that I will make **** sure that whoever the previous owner/s (this is 40K after all) would rather like it back.

 

My players now actively avoid items that are cheaper than they think they should be for fear of the strings that might be attached to it.

 

Regards

 

Surak

Elior and segara82 like this

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@Surak: I know the "long list of shinies" problem very well. One of my players doesn't actually list his current weapon statistics on his character sheet -- he lists the stats of the weapons he'd like to own. He has the damage, range, etc of all his own weapons memorized, but it's a problem if he can't make a session and somebody else ends up controlling his character.

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The way I tend to use the handbook is as a GM-side aid only, my players don't get to see the vast lists of stuff - they get the printout of a selection of those guns that the store they are in happens to stock, it also allows me to to keep generic stock lists and stock lists for traders that the group keep going back to. All in all its a little work on my part pre-session for what turns out to be a quite subtle way of giving the setting depth.

 

I do find that giving players too much access to the armoury chapters of books tends to generate a long list of shiny's that the player now simply must have, and my solution to this is very simple. If they want some sort of Uber-weapon that will make their character the most powerful thing since te emperor then I will make them work for it, I will make them chase rumours of it, when they eventually find a trader who has it (assuming I didn't like it so much I gave it to a major NPC) I will make them pay through the nose in Thrones for it, and once they've done all that I will make **** sure that whoever the previous owner/s (this is 40K after all) would rather like it back.

 

My players now actively avoid items that are cheaper than they think they should be for fear of the strings that might be attached to it.

 

Regards

 

Surak

 

I really like this style of GMing. My players also scour the source book and make lists of items that they want. They will also exploit any rule or situation to get it too. Gotta be on my toes for those situations.

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