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lord inquisitor Iannise

Ork meat

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Unfortunately, the taste is probably very similar.  :unsure:

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

An interesting thing would also be the player characters' reactions. Depending on the individual Acolyte's home culture, some of them might not mind at all, others might be okay with squigs but not Orks, yet others would regard any Orkoid meat (including squigs) as unclean for spiritual reasons.

Out of curiosity, how did the PCs react - was there an argument within the group?

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Unfortunately, the taste is probably very similar.  :unsure:

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

An interesting thing would also be the player characters' reactions. Depending on the individual Acolyte's home culture, some of them might not mind at all, others might be okay with squigs but not Orks, yet others would regard any Orkoid meat (including squigs) as unclean for spiritual reasons.

Out of curiosity, how did the PCs react - was there an argument within the group?

They haven't eaten it yet last session, they just ran out of Corps Starch. The adapt just asked if ork was an option.

But if you want to know the home worlds the adapt and assassin are noble born bothers. The assassin has a hunting rifle and the adapt is unarmed for now. The guardsman is from a feral world he has a short sword, hand cannon and heavy stubber. The big guy to scored two 10s when rolling for strength AND a 10 and 9 for toughness now 45 and 44 respectfully so when they do run out of ammo he can just punch orks to death. Them there's the the tech priest hes mined from a forge world and has a las carbine and a utility mechadendrite.    

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Unfortunately, the taste is probably very similar.  :unsure:

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

An interesting thing would also be the player characters' reactions. Depending on the individual Acolyte's home culture, some of them might not mind at all, others might be okay with squigs but not Orks, yet others would regard any Orkoid meat (including squigs) as unclean for spiritual reasons.

Out of curiosity, how did the PCs react - was there an argument within the group?

They haven't eaten it yet last session, they just ran out of Corps Starch. The adapt just asked if ork was an option.

But if you want to know the home worlds the adapt and assassin are noble born bothers. The assassin has a hunting rifle and the adapt is unarmed for now. The guardsman is from a feral world he has a short sword, hand cannon and heavy stubber. The big guy to scored two 10s when rolling for strength AND a 10 and 9 for toughness now 45 and 44 respectfully so when they do run out of ammo he can just punch orks to death. Them there's the the tech priest hes mined from a forge world and has a las carbine and a utility mechadendrite.    

 

 

Orks have a TB of 8 in Dark Heresy. How can he punch them to death? The must damage he can do with his fists is 1d5+3, if he has Crushing Blow.

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[...]

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

[...]

Eh, matter of interpretation. Orks don't have souls, squigs don't have souls, so what does it really matter, really?

*eats some green with the blessing of the Emperor*

 

Orks have a TB of 8 in Dark Heresy. How can he punch them to death? The must damage he can do with his fists is 1d5+3, if he has Crushing Blow.

Righteous Fury.

Obviously.

Edited by Fgdsfg

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[...]

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

[...]

Eh, matter of interpretation. Orks don't have souls, squigs don't have souls, so what does it really matter, really?

*eats some green with the blessing of the Emperor*

Given the Orcish habit of eating humans, we can probably assume Orchish biochemistry isn't inherently toxic to humans. Probably...

But Orcs are full of fungi and algae that can fairly intelligently repair Orch physiology, which happens to be remarkably similar to the human, at least in broad strokes. So assuming any ingested bits of Orc isn't entirely digested, or that human digestion simply isn't fast enough, it does strike me as suitably 40K scienc'y that it would all bloom to life within the poor human host and rapidly murder the hell out of him in a grotesque & mushroom garden-like fashion.

As for food taboos, they generally have to do with the edibility of the material, and soul isn't a very common criteria. In fact, it's occasionally the justification for eating things people otherwise wouldn't eat in a million years - like the pulverised skulls of family members, for example.

If Orcs are in fact edible, I can easily imagine that Orc-plagued feral worlds will have Orc-eating traditions. Perhaps tribal warriors would eat the brains or biceps of a particularly cunning or large Orc before battle, to absorb its strength, or something along those lines. We Earthlings have done such things, though we've substituted Orc with Human, since the former is kind of scarce around here.

Orks have a TB of 8 in Dark Heresy. How can he punch them to death? The must damage he can do with his fists is 1d5+3, if he has Crushing Blow.

Righteous Fury.

Obviously.

*Likes*

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Eh, matter of interpretation. Orks don't have souls, squigs don't have souls, so what does it really matter, really?

 

Of course it's a matter of interpretation - it is a matter of the individual character's culture, after all. But I could see some people making a distinction between Orks and squigs because the former are "people" and the latter "animals", and culture dictating that you just don't eat people (i.e. anything that talks)..

 

Righteous Fury.

Obviously.

 

:lol:

 

If Orcs are in fact edible, I can easily imagine that Orc-plagued feral worlds will have Orc-eating traditions. Perhaps tribal warriors would eat the brains or biceps of a particularly cunning or large Orc before battle, to absorb its strength, or something along those lines.

 

I recall the Flesh Tearers having developed an appetite for them. :P

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Unfortunately, the taste is probably very similar.  :unsure:

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

An interesting thing would also be the player characters' reactions. Depending on the individual Acolyte's home culture, some of them might not mind at all, others might be okay with squigs but not Orks, yet others would regard any Orkoid meat (including squigs) as unclean for spiritual reasons.

Out of curiosity, how did the PCs react - was there an argument within the group?

They haven't eaten it yet last session, they just ran out of Corps Starch. The adapt just asked if ork was an option.

But if you want to know the home worlds the adapt and assassin are noble born bothers. The assassin has a hunting rifle and the adapt is unarmed for now. The guardsman is from a feral world he has a short sword, hand cannon and heavy stubber. The big guy to scored two 10s when rolling for strength AND a 10 and 9 for toughness now 45 and 44 respectfully so when they do run out of ammo he can just punch orks to death. Them there's the the tech priest hes mined from a forge world and has a las carbine and a utility mechadendrite.    

 

 

Orks have a TB of 8 in Dark Heresy. How can he punch them to death? The must damage he can do with his fists is 1d5+3, if he has Crushing Blow.

 

Well i was joking but, the book does says a successful hit causes one level of fatigue so... beat the ork asleep?  

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[...]

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

[...]

Eh, matter of interpretation. Orks don't have souls, squigs don't have souls, so what does it really matter, really?

*eats some green with the blessing of the Emperor*

 

Orks have a TB of 8 in Dark Heresy. How can he punch them to death? The must damage he can do with his fists is 1d5+3, if he has Crushing Blow.

Righteous Fury.

Obviously.

 

 

Not very dependably.

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Unfortunately, the taste is probably very similar.  :unsure:

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

An interesting thing would also be the player characters' reactions. Depending on the individual Acolyte's home culture, some of them might not mind at all, others might be okay with squigs but not Orks, yet others would regard any Orkoid meat (including squigs) as unclean for spiritual reasons.

Out of curiosity, how did the PCs react - was there an argument within the group?

They haven't eaten it yet last session, they just ran out of Corps Starch. The adapt just asked if ork was an option.

But if you want to know the home worlds the adapt and assassin are noble born bothers. The assassin has a hunting rifle and the adapt is unarmed for now. The guardsman is from a feral world he has a short sword, hand cannon and heavy stubber. The big guy to scored two 10s when rolling for strength AND a 10 and 9 for toughness now 45 and 44 respectfully so when they do run out of ammo he can just punch orks to death. Them there's the the tech priest hes mined from a forge world and has a las carbine and a utility mechadendrite.    

 

 

Orks have a TB of 8 in Dark Heresy. How can he punch them to death? The must damage he can do with his fists is 1d5+3, if he has Crushing Blow.

 

Well i was joking but, the book does says a successful hit causes one level of fatigue so... beat the ork asleep?  

 

 

Unless the rules for this were different in DH than in later games (I don't remember), you have to exceed the target's TB withyour damage to do Fatigue, meaning that this is unlikely. :) Albeit more likely than punching it to death. :)

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But Orcs are full of fungi and algae that can fairly intelligently repair Orch physiology, which happens to be remarkably similar to the human, at least in broad strokes. So assuming any ingested bits of Orc isn't entirely digested, or that human digestion simply isn't fast enough, it does strike me as suitably 40K scienc'y that it would all bloom to life within the poor human host and rapidly murder the hell out of him in a grotesque & mushroom garden-like fashion.

 

I don't think Ork Regeneration is that powerful that there is possibility of old D&D scenario.

 

"Cannibal Dwarf ate hand of a troll. About week later he died when the troll hand, he had eaten, carved it's way out through his chest." Well he was NPC, but quite powerfull NPC, so no fudging dices with him. It was quite grotesque

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I don't think Ork Regeneration is that powerful that there is possibility of old D&D scenario.

 

"Cannibal Dwarf ate hand of a troll. About week later he died when the troll hand, he had eaten, carved it's way out through his chest." Well he was NPC, but quite powerfull NPC, so no fudging dices with him. It was quite grotesque

I wasn't even considering that scenario. I was thinking more along the lines of the algae and fungi bits trying to "repair" the human organism, because it's close enough to Orc that those repair mechanisms wouldn't be able to tell the difference.

But the eaten part of the Orc regenerating and trying to work its way out of its consumer, sounds like a horrifically fun scenario.

Oh eww! Suddenly having a mental image of one very hungry guardsman trying to cough up a half-eaten & suddenly revitalised wig-squig.

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Unfortunately, the taste is probably very similar.  :unsure:

 

That being said, it'd likely still be a better option, if only because squigs are considered animals rather than sentient beings...

 

An interesting thing would also be the player characters' reactions. Depending on the individual Acolyte's home culture, some of them might not mind at all, others might be okay with squigs but not Orks, yet others would regard any Orkoid meat (including squigs) as unclean for spiritual reasons.

Out of curiosity, how did the PCs react - was there an argument within the group?

They haven't eaten it yet last session, they just ran out of Corps Starch. The adapt just asked if ork was an option.

But if you want to know the home worlds the adapt and assassin are noble born bothers. The assassin has a hunting rifle and the adapt is unarmed for now. The guardsman is from a feral world he has a short sword, hand cannon and heavy stubber. The big guy to scored two 10s when rolling for strength AND a 10 and 9 for toughness now 45 and 44 respectfully so when they do run out of ammo he can just punch orks to death. Them there's the the tech priest hes mined from a forge world and has a las carbine and a utility mechadendrite.    

 

 

Orks have a TB of 8 in Dark Heresy. How can he punch them to death? The must damage he can do with his fists is 1d5+3, if he has Crushing Blow.

 

Well i was joking but, the book does says a successful hit causes one level of fatigue so... beat the ork asleep?  

 

 

Unless the rules for this were different in DH than in later games (I don't remember), you have to exceed the target's TB withyour damage to do Fatigue, meaning that this is unlikely. :) Albeit more likely than punching it to death. :)

 

nope in DH u just need to make contact :P  

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Unless the rules for this were different in DH than in later games (I don't remember), you have to exceed the target's TB withyour damage to do Fatigue, meaning that this is unlikely. :) Albeit more likely than punching it to death. :)

 

nope in DH u just need to make contact :P  

 

 

I think that an erratum says that you have to exceed the target's TB withyour damage to do Fatigue, in DH too.

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The so-called Waaagh!-field is a more tricky topic. I've taken a stroll through the Codex and the TT rulebooks, but could indeed not locate a specific mention of Orks making their gear work by sheer power of belief. It may indeed seem as if this is just one of the many "urban legends" within the community - personal opinion that, for whatever reason, has become so widely accepted that it is nowadays often presented as universal fact, just like with the myth about 40k canon, the oft-exaggerated body height of the Space Marines, or the Adeptus Mechanicus merely being an ally and an equal partner of the Imperium rather than a fully integrated part of it, to name just a few.

Seems I never actually read the first page of this topic.

Orks making stuff work because they believe it will, is not an urban legend, as you call it. The concept has been around since the first edition of the wargame, but with third edition the fluff explicitly said that it wasn't simply an Orc belief that various things worked better if they wanted them to. Orc weapons officially became fuelled by faith, to the extent that other races couldn't make their tech or tools work. It crept right into the rules as the explanation for why Choppas were so very good at carving up Marines, and for why a red paintjob really did make stuff go fasta as long as an Orc was driving.

If there's an urban legend here, it's that 40K Orcs aren't even more faith-powered than 40K RPG Bondage Nuns.

As for the AdMech, I'd have to go on a fluff-expedition to be certain, but I'm fairly sure it's been described as a wholly independent empire within the empire on at least a couple of occasions. I am, however, also fairly sure it's been described as something akin to a "home rule" situation pretty consistently since always. The fluff about the AdMech having a civil war ending with their formal recognition of The Corpse With No Name as their god incarnate, and them being integrated into the newly minted Imperium isn't exactly new.

... I guess my point is there's probably no such thing as 40K urban legends. It's just that the fluff can be very inconsistent, and has changed a great deal over the years.

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Orks making stuff work because they believe it will, is not an urban legend, as you call it. The concept has been around since the first edition of the wargame, but with third edition the fluff explicitly said that it wasn't simply an Orc belief that various things worked better if they wanted them to. Orc weapons officially became fuelled by faith, to the extent that other races couldn't make their tech or tools work.

 

But ... where? Can you point me to a specific Codex that actually says this? That's what I've been saying - I took it at face value because everybody said this. But now that I've tried to confirm this I cannot find any mention of it in GW's books. If I haven't looked hard enough, I'd certainly appreciate any pointers, as I've decided to make my personal interpretation of the setting dependent on what the core studio publishes.

 

And with urban legends I am referring to "accepted truths" where an entire community, or at least the vocal majority, has subscribed to and propagates a very specific idea as gospel. Like when I've been told that "everything is canon". Or when you've got people saying "Marines are 9 feet high" and not even accept the existence of contradicting material.

Word of mouth is very strong in this franchise, specifically because it is so inconsistent between the various origins.

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The belief-magic thing is actually just an in-universe theory by an admech adept from a one off fluff piece.

 

The jist of the article is tht invents a supernatural reason for why Ork tech works when all his indoctrinated ritualistic understaning says it shouldn`t work. Basically he couldn`t grsp why the machine spirit put up with such abuse. (The reason being that it doesn`t exist.)

 

Basically he claims "wizards did it" because his religion can`t explain it... like fossils and dinosaurs.

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The belief-magic thing is actually just an in-universe theory by an admech adept from a one off fluff piece.

 

The jist of the article is tht invents a supernatural reason for why Ork tech works when all his indoctrinated ritualistic understaning says it shouldn`t work. Basically he couldn`t grsp why the machine spirit put up with such abuse. (The reason being that it doesn`t exist.)

 

Basically he claims  because his religion can`t explain it... like fossils and dinosaurs.

In warhammer 40k "a wizards did it" is not only a valid theory, but the most probable one. :D  

Edited by lord inquisitor Iannise

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The forum and some browsers are sensitive to words being copied from other websites or documents, attempting to replicate the original formatting. I recommend pasting the text into Notepad first, and then copying that and paste it into the forums.

 

Notepad basically "purges" any formatting attached to whatever you have copypasted. ;)

Edited by Lynata

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The forum and some browsers are sensitive to words being copied from other websites or documents, attempting to replicate the original formatting. I recommend pasting the text into Notepad first, and then copying that and paste it into the forums.

 

Notepad basically "purges" any formatting attached to whatever you have copypasted. ;)

You can also go to the upper right of the reply window, and press Options.

There's an option for "Paste as plain text as default".

That said, I usually go with the notepad or browser address field solution. :D

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I usually purge my paste as it is being processed. And if that doesn't work, I paste my processed into the purge.

 

And if that still doesn't work, I distill the essence of my creation into my excretion,  and then ask for seconds.

 

And then I usually pass out, drunk and wasted. Good night!

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But ... where? Can you point me to a specific Codex that actually says this? That's what I've been saying - I took it at face value because everybody said this. But now that I've tried to confirm this I cannot find any mention of it in GW's books. If I haven't looked hard enough, I'd certainly appreciate any pointers, as I've decided to make my personal interpretation of the setting dependent on what the core studio publishes.

The Wargear section of the 3e Codex: Orks, as well as the last two fluff pieces in the same codex.

 

And with urban legends I am referring to "accepted truths" where an entire community, or at least the vocal majority, has subscribed to and propagates a very specific idea as gospel. Like when I've been told that "everything is canon". Or when you've got people saying "Marines are 9 feet high" and not even accept the existence of contradicting material.

Word of mouth is very strong in this franchise, specifically because it is so inconsistent between the various origins.

My point was that those beliefs tend to come from somewhere. Orks fuelling everything with magic, for example, isn't something fans dreamt up. It's been canon since Orks got psykers. Though it wasn't until the drastic redesign of Orks in 3e, that Ork magic started affecting everything.

I have no idea where the 9ft Marines come from, but I'd be entirely unsurprised if it came from GW.

And the "everything is canon" thing does come from GW. It's been the official word on what's canon and what isn't since... Probably since 2e I think.

 

How do i fix's that?

The two first buttons in the top left corner of the reply window are:

1. A button letting you view the reply box unformatted. The button looks like an oldschool electric switch.

2. A button letting you erase the formatting of anything you have hilighted in the reply box. The button looks like a pencil eraser.

The first button lets you manually edit formatting as you please. The second removes formatting for you.

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The Wargear section of the 3e Codex: Orks, as well as the last two fluff pieces in the same codex.

 

Ah, thanks! I'll take a look tomorrow. :)

 

I have no idea where the 9ft Marines come from, but I'd be entirely unsurprised if it came from GW.

 

Black Library novels, where else. :P Specifically, Dan Abnett seems to have a penchant for Ubermarines.

 

Jes Goodwin even jokes on this GW Design Podcast that they "seem to be getting bigger with every book".

 

To me, this is just a lame attempt by some authors to "one-up" each other, because bigger is probably still perceived as better. Even when it starts to get ridiculous (considering that Marines still use an APC designed for normal human colonists).

 

And the "everything is canon" thing does come from GW. It's been the official word on what's canon and what isn't since... Probably since 2e I think.

 

The actual wording is "everything and nothing is true". It just gets distorted and misquoted a lot - hence my newfound scepticism on just believing everything merely because it was posted on some forum, and nobody objected.

 

I actually went around to hunt for real quotes, only to discover that they contradicted a lot of what I've been told by other fans: http://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/462296.page#4527011

 

Of course those beliefs you mentioned come from somewhere - the problem is that word of mouth and bad memory often distort the original statement - that was my point.

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