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Ceodryn

Recommended 1 session/short adventures from D6, D20, Saga edition to convert to EotE?

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Hi guys,

I am looking for short, 1 to 2 sessions max, adventures from D6, D20 or Saga edition that I could convert to EotE. Most adventuresI find deal mostly with the rebels or the Jedis, which isn't the setting of EotE. Is there any that you recall that would be well suited to EotE (I can convert it fine, I just need the framework).

Thanks

Ceodryn

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 Smuggler's Rendezvous, a mini adventure from Saga Edition's Scum & Villainy, is a fun little ride. Add in some elements from that book's Fringe Campaigns chapter (like the "Retrograde Technology" Adventure Hook, the players find a droideka for sale and go about trying to purchase it), and you've got a solid 1-2 session adventure.

The Fell Star, a full adventure also from S&V, is fun but my play group took like 3 sessions to play through it. Though that was in Saga Edition with the 1-2 hour combat encounters. I think perhaps for EotE it might only take a session or two to play through.

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 Tatooine Manhunt  (d6) could be adapted easily enough.

Otherspace (WEG) can be 1 session, with a group that is just looking to get out, but typically is 2-3 sessions.

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I adapted Rendezvous at Ord Mantell from Star Wars Gamer 1 for use as a intro-level adventure for my Saturday gaming group.  Didn't take much to convert it from OCR either.  And it can be useful as a lead-in for a campaign involving the Rebel Alliance as well.

You may have to do a bit of web-searching, but there's also the excellent "A Much Larger Galaxy…" adventure that was written during the early days of Saga Edition.  It shouldn't be too difficult to convert, though I'd suggest changing the BBEG's weapons from short 'sabers to vibro-swords, as lightsabers are a much bigger deal in EotE than they were in SWSE.  Or just dropping the BBEG listed in the module and replace her with an Emperor's Hand from the Adversaries chapter instead.

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 The d6 adventure "Starfall" could be a good one to adapt. I last ran it in a single session New Years Eve game a few years back, taken between 5-10 hours (character creation included). I found it an easy adventure to improvise and adapt to player actions, and being aboard a dying star destroyer was very cool and thematic, I was able to grab the narrative and run for miles so to speak.  

The downside, the adventure assumes the players are rebels, so a little less thematic for EotE. Then again, your characters start off in a prison cell about the star destroyer, and I think it relatively easy to replace them with bounty hunters or other mercenaries… I know most of my PCs were. The up shot, I think the dying ship would be fertile grounds to really explore and run with the narrative dice, giving a number of exciting options for advantage and threat and so on.

The adventure was published under its own name and later in Classic Adventures: Volume Five.

Note: I am biased in favour of this one, it was one of the best adventure runs I ever had, the PCs managed to escape the dying star destroyer exactly at midnight, the deadline I had half-jokingly said (and they took deadly serious) the ship would explode - made for a fantastic description and new years countdown!

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Crimson_red said:

 The d6 adventure "Starfall" could be a good one to adapt. I last ran it in a single session New Years Eve game a few years back, taken between 5-10 hours (character creation included). I found it an easy adventure to improvise and adapt to player actions, and being aboard a dying star destroyer was very cool and thematic, I was able to grab the narrative and run for miles so to speak.  

The downside, the adventure assumes the players are rebels, so a little less thematic for EotE. Then again, your characters start off in a prison cell about the star destroyer, and I think it relatively easy to replace them with bounty hunters or other mercenaries… I know most of my PCs were. The up shot, I think the dying ship would be fertile grounds to really explore and run with the narrative dice, giving a number of exciting options for advantage and threat and so on.

I was thinking of adapting this one too, and just having my PCs stumble across the wrecked ship.  Maybe even throw a couple of other scavenging/smuggling teams on board to make things interesting.

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WEG's Tatooine Manhunt IS a great mission… but it's not a 1-2 session thing…

Most of the Missons in the WEG MosEisley "Starter" Box  (White booklet ) were designed to be 1-4 hour  'Primers' 
also the "Instant Adventure" source book had several short  scenarios 

  

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 Thanks for the replies!

I scoured the ancient books, and found the following adventures that could be (I think) easily adapted and run within a few sessions:

  • D20 - Cat & Mouse
  • D20 - The Smugglers of Naboo
  • Saga - Scum & Villainy - Mini-Adventures
  • Saga - Scum & Villainy - The Fell Star
  • WEG - Classic Adventures Vol 1 - The Politic of Contraband
  • WEG - Instant Adventures - Heavy Lifting, Into the Heat of Battle, Family Problems, The Treasure of Celis Mott
  • WEG - The Pirates of Prexiar

I havent run any of those, I just quickly skimmed them and found they could work for a group of "fringers". 

Cheers

Ceodryn

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The Madman said:

WEG's Tatooine Manhunt IS a great mission… but it's not a 1-2 session thing…

Most of the Missons in the WEG MosEisley "Starter" Box  (White booklet ) were designed to be 1-4 hour  'Primers' 
also the "Instant Adventure" source book had several short  scenarios 

  

never had it run past two sessions, usually done in one.

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I've been using the Treasure Hunting Mission descriptions from SWTOR, (Found a list on swtor wiki)  as adventure seeds for my group of fringers "collecting" items for a Hutt clan. I can usually get 3 of the encounters run in one session.

 

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Any of the adventures centered around the Minos Cluster, alla Galaxy Guide 7: Tram Freighters (D6), best supplment for ANY Star Wars system EVER!

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Any of the adventures centered around the Minos Cluster, alla Galaxy Guide 7: Tramp Freighters (D6), best supplment for ANY Star Wars system EVER!

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Crimson_red said:

 

 The d6 adventure "Starfall" could be a good one to adapt. I last ran it in a single session New Years Eve game a few years back, taken between 5-10 hours (character creation included). I found it an easy adventure to improvise and adapt to player actions, and being aboard a dying star destroyer was very cool and thematic, I was able to grab the narrative and run for miles so to speak.  

The downside, the adventure assumes the players are rebels, so a little less thematic for EotE. Then again, your characters start off in a prison cell about the star destroyer, and I think it relatively easy to replace them with bounty hunters or other mercenaries… I know most of my PCs were. The up shot, I think the dying ship would be fertile grounds to really explore and run with the narrative dice, giving a number of exciting options for advantage and threat and so on.

The adventure was published under its own name and later in Classic Adventures: Volume Five.

Note: I am biased in favour of this one, it was one of the best adventure runs I ever had, the PCs managed to escape the dying star destroyer exactly at midnight, the deadline I had half-jokingly said (and they took deadly serious) the ship would explode - made for a fantastic description and new years countdown!

 

 

Back in February, before any of this new EotE stuff was known about, me and my players decided to break out WEGs D6 and start a campaign. I decided (quite amazingly) that I wanted the whole party to be outlaws and tied to several characters in the canon. Our campaign takes place in the area about 3 years before A New Hope.

My group is only able to meet every couple of months due to us not living in the same area anymore. This means when we do get together, it is usually 1 normal session, and one VERY extended play session. Our first adventure, I adapted "Starfall."

Our Starfall was a bit different because I wanted to eliminate the whole "Rebel Battle" part of the adventure…

The party is an outlaw group of pirates who target Imperial transports. They jumped out of hyperspace into a ship yard with a prototype Interdictor-class star destroyer which promptly prevented them from escaping with its gravity well projectors. After a small TIE fighter combat, they were captured. The entire adventure flipped around to them trying to escape from the detention block and escape the Star Destroyer while running into "Terrorists" (pre-rebellion remnants of the Antarian Rangers) who were in the middle of a mission to destroy the prototype. Once the charges went off and the Star Destroyer starting careening into the planet below, the pressure to leave got rather tense (haha). Other minor changes, the "Y-wing" that was imbedded in the hull was a TIE fighter (mishap due to confusion when charges went off, etc)… stuff like that. There was no battle going on outside. There was very little staff actually on the ship because it was not even finished yet.

My thought is, it was a GREAT one to convert and the party loved it. I think they really liked it because it gave that real Episode 4, Death Star escape feel to it. However, it seems like it would take longer than 3 sessions. We did it in a 4-6 hour session, and a 12+ hour session and I threw out a couple encounters. I usually keep 2 or 3 in my head that might be dumped in time crunches.

Another note: My group just now is setting up a meetup in January and I am looking to read some things to adapt, so thanks for your suggestions!

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Ceodryn said:

 Thanks for the replies!

I scoured the ancient books, and found the following adventures that could be (I think) easily adapted and run within a few sessions:

  • D20 - Cat & Mouse
  • D20 - The Smugglers of Naboo
  • Saga - Scum & Villainy - Mini-Adventures
  • Saga - Scum & Villainy - The Fell Star
  • WEG - Classic Adventures Vol 1 - The Politic of Contraband
  • WEG - Instant Adventures - Heavy Lifting, Into the Heat of Battle, Family Problems, The Treasure of Celis Mott
  • WEG - The Pirates of Prexiar

I havent run any of those, I just quickly skimmed them and found they could work for a group of "fringers". 

Cheers

Ceodryn

I ran Pirates of Prexiar as my first adventure for my group.  Parts of it are fine, but the second act has a vehicle chase where players are using personal weapons against vehicles, and it works pretty poorly.  Just a heads up.

-WJL

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I've have some luck with converting the mini adventures from Scum & Villainy, so I can recommend that. You don't need to use the locations provided there either - I simply used Cloud City as a base for a couple of them. Until the players got themselves wanted for killing Imperial officials, that is, so now I mostly wing things based on their actions (which works incredibly well with the Edge rules, btw).

But the suggestions above should be valid. There's also the Rebellion Era sourcebook and a few of the same kind of sourcebooks (I only ever bought the Rebellion one) from the first d20 rules which have an outline for a complete (and rather long) campaign. It should be easy to borrow parts of that for a few sessions, and easier still to evolve it further if that's something you want.

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LethalDose said:

I ran Pirates of Prexiar as my first adventure for my group.  Parts of it are fine, but the second act has a vehicle chase where players are using personal weapons against vehicles, and it works pretty poorly.  Just a heads up.

-WJL

Works pretty poorly as in, "You don't do enough damage with anything short of a blaster carbine," which is the smallest weapon a starting character can actually hurt any vehicle with reliably.

And you're only going to find Caribines and Rifles in people with extra obligation spent. 

Note that it takes 3s to make a heavy blaster pistol do a single point to an unarmored very light craft. And, unless one of them is from a triumph, that's probably not going to even be noticed. 

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Going back to the d6 book 'Instant Adventures', for my first test of the beta, I decided to adopt the 'Heavy Lifting' adventure. It's a fun romp, and adapts very well to a smuggler-based campaign.

Another really good d6 book is 'The Politics of Contraband', which is a series of adventures specifically written for a smuggler/fringe based campaign.

'Han Solo and the Corporate Sector' is also a good one to look at. In fact, I'd suggest reading the trilogy it's based on. You can get a lot of good ideas for a campaign from them.

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Hey guys, I just wanted to summarize all adventures that were mentionned to close this thread:

 

  • D20 - Cat & Mouse
  • D20 - The Smugglers of Naboo
  • D20 - Star Wars Gamer - Rendezvous at Ord Mantell
  • Saga - Scum & Villainy - Mini-Adventures (ex: Smuggler's Rendezvous)
  • Saga - Scum & Villainy - The Fell Star
  • WEG - Classic Adventures Vol 1 - The Politic of Contraband
  • WEG - Instant Adventures - Heavy Lifting, Into the Heat of Battle, Family Problems, The Treasure of Celis Mott
  • WEG - The Pirates of Prexiar
  • WEG - Tatoine Manhunt
  • WEG - Otherspace
  • WEG - Mos Eisley Starter Box Adventures
  • WEG - Galaxt Guide 7: Tram Freigthers Plot/ Adventures
  • WEG - Starfall
  • WEG - Han Solo and the Corportate Sector Plot/Adventures

Thanks for the tips,

Cheers

Ceodryn

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Ceodryn said:

  • WEG - Galaxt Guide 7: Tram Freigthers Plot/ Adventures

That'd be 'Galaxy Guide 6: Tramp Freighters', for those scouring eBay. Man, I miss my copy of that book…

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I. J. Thompson said:

Ceodryn said:

 

  • WEG - Galaxt Guide 7: Tram Freigthers Plot/ Adventures

 

 

That'd be 'Galaxy Guide 6: Tramp Freighters', for those scouring eBay. Man, I miss my copy of that book…

So glad I have all my D6 stuff.

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I found a very simple adventure called "Gun Nut" that was converted to Saga and I converted to EotE. Very short and simple, and I changed it a bit fit my world. 

1) I moved it to Tech since Trevura in the Inner Core did not fit the early days of EotE. The provided module on Nal Hutta did not link well to this, so I made the location change.

2) I kept Merno Blask, but I adjusted that he was field testing the blaster on Teth. Interestingly, I think it makes the assassin droid a bit more believable. 

3) I changed the Storm Troopers to Planetary Defense Forces. Storm Troopers do not belong this far out for this type of task. Perhaps if it was a giant moon base or something important. 

I used some other links with Raxus Prime (where the weapon was being developed by a Loranar Jawa scientist). I left this part out of the adventure I am posting, so it is close to the original.

-M00t

---->Here you go--->

 

Gun Nut

 

Modified for the Star Wars Saga rules by Phantom

Modified for Star Wars Edge of the Empire [beta] by Mootpoint

 

A Free Star Wars Mini-adventure for the Rebellion Era

 

U.S., CANADA €OPEAN HEADQUARTERS

ASIA, PACIFIC, & LATIN AMERICA Wizards of the Coast, Belgium

Wizards of the Coast, Inc. P.B. 2031

P.O. Box 707 2600 Berchem

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Questions? 1-800-324-6496 +32-70-23-32-77

www.wizards.com/starwars www.starwars.com

 

DESIGN: JEFF QUICK

EDITING: RAY AND VALERIE VALLESE

TYPESETTING: SUE WEINLEIN COOK

WEB PRODUCTION: DANIEL STAHL

WEB DEVELOPMENT: THOM BECKMAN

ART DIRECTION: SEAN GLENN

LUCAS LICENSING EDITOR: MICHELLE VUKOVICH

STAR WARS RPG CREATIVE DIRECTOR: CHRIS PERKINS

VICE PRESIDENT AND DIRECTOR OF RPG R&D: BILL SLAVICSEK

 

Some artwork is used without permission and is taken from the internet.

 

©2002 Lucasfilm Ltd. & ™ All rights reserved. Used under authorization. Made in the U.S.A.

 

Dungeons & Dragons and the Wizards of the Coast logo are registered trademarks owned by Wizards of the Coast, Inc. The d20 System logo is a trademark owned by Wizards of the Coast. Inc. This Wizards of the Coast game product contains no Open Game Content. No portion of this work may be reproduced in any form without written permission. To learn more about the Open Gaming License and the d20 System License, please visit www.wizards.com/d20. This material is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Any reproduction or unauthorized use of the material or artwork contained herein is prohibited without the express written permission of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. This product is a work of fiction. Any similarity to actual people, organizations, places, or events is purely coincidental. Based on the Star Wars Roleplaying Game by Andy Collins, Bill Slavicsek, and JD Wiker, utilizing mechanics developed for the new DUNGEONS & DRAGONS® game by Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, Richard Baker, and Peter Adkison.

 

“Gun Nut” is a Star Wars Roleplaying Game adventure for four 3rd-level heroes set during the Rebellion Era. It takes place on Teth, a planet on the Outer Rim that is tacitly controlled by the empire, but heavily influenced by the Hutts. However, the scenario can be modified easily to work on nearly any planet civilized enough to have a sizeable droid population. No special mix of classes is necessary, though the adventure is much easier to start if the heroes have a droid with them. The GM as always should feel free to change anything to fit their, own game. The Gun Nut adventure has more than one path, so read carefully before running it.

 

Background

 

   The Empire constantly seeks technological improvements to help solidify its galactic chokehold. Since the Rebellion has demonstrated a reliance on droids for many tasks, one of the research and development teams on Coruscant has created a new blaster setting that specifically affects droids. The design was developed on the Planet Raxus Prime in one of the factories of Loronar Corporation. Basically, the technical engineers have incorporated the effects of an ion gun into a normal blaster rifle, creating a third setting in addition to stun and kill. This blaster setting is officially called “inhibit,” though it’s more colloquially referred to as “jawa” by the R&D technicians who adapted the technology taken from the ion guns carried by Jawas of Tatooine.

   Meanwhile, an assassin droid known as S-R6 (Essar) has been hired by an underground droid enclave on Raxus Prime to kill the Trevura Imperial governor, Merno Blask. Merno Blask has taken this new development with a child's giddiness.

 

Merno Blask has recently visited Rexus and has taken several prototypes for testing back on his home planet. On his way back to Trevura, Blask is asked to visit Teth. Blask is visiting Teth to provide input to the new naval base Perron. Blask is even more bigoted against droids than many fringers are. On Trevura, droids are barely allowed to walk in the streets without being hassled by the local law enforcement. With a new naval base under construction, Blask is even more paranoid on his visit to Teth.

  Blask has heard of a contract on his life, to be carried out by a droid. He’s terrified that IG-88 or some other high-level assassin droid is out to get him. Calling in some favors, he’s gotten the technicians to arrange a “field test” of their new blasters in Peroon, the capital city of Teth.

   As the planetary defense force troopers sweep the city, ionizing and searching every droid they see that even walks funny, the technicians who adapted the technology for blaster rifle use are watching from a distance, taking notes on the equipment’s performance out in the field.

 

Getting the Heroes Involved

 

   If the heroes have their own droid, or if one of the heroes is a droid, getting them involved is very easy. The defence force troopers mistake the heroes’ droid for one of the rogue droids they’re hunting and open fire.

   If the heroes have no droid, you can give them a “loaner” for purposes of this adventure. The heroes’ patron might send them on a cover assignment to assess and consider purchasing land on Teth, when the actual task is to escort an astromech droid who carries information about Empire weapons research off the planet.

 

Scene 1: The Obligatory

 

Read or paraphrase the following text aloud to your players:

 

As you go about your business, you notice an unusually large number of planetary defense force troopers wandering about the city. Working in pairs, they caution everyone to stand back from any droids, as rogue droids are reportedly on the loose, carrying concealed weapons. Every once in a while, seemingly at random, they fire an ozone-smelling, spherical blue burst of light at a nearby droid. Droids hit by the burst rattle, smoke, and cease functioning. That’s all you can make out before the troopers descend on the helpless droid.

 

   Though the defense force troopers loudly explain that they’re hunting dangerous rogue droids, they don’t mention that they’re also field-testing new equipment in the process. They know that their blaster rifles won’t hurt any of the organic residents while the weapons are set to inhibit, so they have no compunction about firing into crowds—especially if anyone seems particularly nervous or proprietary about his or her droid.

   If the heroes watch the defense force troopers for a while, ask them to make a Perception check. Those who succeed at an average difficulty check (2D) notice a small cluster of four Imperial technicians standing about a block away, taking notes on datapads. Those who succeed at a hard difficulty check (3D) also notice a hovering spy eye droid watching them from some distance away.

 

NOTE: If any of the PCs have Imperial conflicts or obligations, they must make a fear check (beta guide pg. 189) equal to their obligation. On a fail, they look very suspicious to the troopers. Disadvantage will add setback dice to the pool for any party member perception check.

 

Probe Droid   (DRK-1)

 

Brawn 2              Cunning 2

Presence 1                  Agility 2

Intellect 1           Willpower 1

Skills: Ranged (light) 3, Vigilance 5

Soak / Defense: 4 / 0

Thresholds: Wound: 10

Abilities: Droid (does not need to breathe, eat, or drink, and can survive in vacuum or underwater. Immune to poisons or toxins.

Equipment: Built-in blaster pistol (Ranged [light]: Damage 6, Critical 3, Range [medium]: Stun Setting), Snare launcher (Ranged [light]; Damage -; Critical -; Range [close]; Ensnare 5, Limited Ammo 1)

Systems hovering locomotion, heuristic processor, intergrated comlink, locked access, secondary battery, improved sensor package, darkvision, stealth shield (+1 setback die bonus to stealth checks).

 

 

Attacking the probe droid will attract the attention of a pair of defense force troopers who will ask why the characters are opening fire on the droid. After the troopers have had a chance to inspect the damaged probe droid, they will become concerned and contact their commanding officer. The GM should just continue the adventure details below from this point on.

 

   Eventually, a pair of troopers catches up to the heroes. The troopers demand that they step away from their droid in case it’s dangerous. If the characters argue or try to negotiate, the troopers ask more politely (and more forcefully) for the heroes to step aside. If the heroes still don’t cooperate, the troopers simply open fire with their blasters set to inhibit.

   Heroes may block an inhibitor blast from reaching a droid target simply by stepping in the way. The blast does no damage to organic creatures.

   If the heroes block the troopers’ line of fire, or if they shoot back, the troopers quickly switch their blasters to kill and return fire. The resulting firefight will probably be short and messy. However, the heroes likely will retain their droid.

   On the other hand, if the characters comply with the troopers’ demands and stand aside, the ’troopers fire on their droid, which stuns it for 2d6 rounds. During that time, the troopers search the droid for hidden compartments, weapons, and contraband. (Roll the troopers Perception check to search the droid against a Stealth check on the heroes’ droid. See the Star Wars Saga rulebook for details on concealed items, page 72) If the heroes’ droid has any of these things, the troopers attempt to impound it as well as bring the heroes in for questioning. Only the universal language of violence will get them to relent. Refer to the Planetary Defense Force Trooper combat encounter below.

 

Planetary Defense Force Trooper Combat Encounter:

 

Use the Planetary Defense Force Trooper statistics from page 202 of the Star Wars: EotE Beta book. This combat encounter calls for two storm-troopers, but the GM could have few more join the battle. I recommend having a squad of six storm-troopers coming to assist. The battle takes place in the main street (6 squares wide) with a few side alleys (2 squares wide) coming off it. Include whatever terrain features you find interesting.

 

NOTE: For a more difficult battle, you can switch to Storm Troopers; however, as elite Imperial troups, there should be a much better reason for them being on the planet than defending the governor.

Planetary Defense Force Trooper[Minion]     (6)

 

Brawn 2               Cunning 2

Presense 12       Agility 2

Intellect 2            Willpower 2

Skills (group only): Brawl, Discipline, Ranged [Light], Ranged [Heavy]

Talents: none

Soak / Defense: 3 / 0

Thresholds: Wounds: 5

Abilities: None

Equipment:  Blaster carbine (Ranged [Heavy]; Damage 10; Critical 3; Range [Medium]; Stun Setting), 2 frag grenades (Melee; Damage 8; Critical 4; Range [Close]; Blast 6; Limited Ammo 1), blast vest (+1 soak)

 

The trooper tactics are to use cover and maximize the effect of their coordinated attack feat. The PC’s should not hang around the battle site after the fight as more troopers will show up about 5 minutes later.

 

Scene 2: Technical Difficulties

 

Assuming that the heroes engaged the troopers in battle and prevailed, what happens next depends on what they do with their opponents’ blaster rifles. Both the Imperial technicians and the spy eye droid saw the gun battle. The technicians don’t appear to take any immediate action, continuing to make notes on their data-pads. But the spy eye droid zips away, off to report to someone provided it is still functioning.

 

 

Ion Gun vs Inhibit Setting (notes):

 

   The inhibit setting basically makes blasters work like ion guns. Though the two types of gun operate from identical power packs, ion guns are designed to channel a stream of energy to short out circuitry, where blasters fire short plasma bursts designed to burn through matter. The conversion is trickier than one would expect, without simply making the blaster rifle twice as heavy.

   A blaster rifle with an inhibit setting has the same statistics as a normal blaster rifle, except that it weighs 1 kg more. When set to inhibit, the rifle's discharge looks like a normal blaster bolt, except that the bolt is blue and vaguely spherical. After discharge, it leaves the smell of ozone in the air, as does an ion gun.

    When a blaster bolt set to inhibit hits a droid, treat the attack like any other ion weapon attack (See the EotE rule book, page 110). When a blaster bolt set to inhibit strikes an organic target, it has no effect other than mild discomfort.

   Firing a blaster set to inhibit drains the power pack of two regular blasters, thus the Ion Blaster is Limited 3.

 

 

2A: They Take the Blasters

 

   The heroes can take the dead troopers’ blaster rifles if they wish. However, the technicians who are following the troopers will probably notice. If the heroes try to hide or disguise their appropriation of the weapons, give the technicians an [average] Perception check to spot what they’re doing.

   The technicians, though loyal to the Empire, are curious to see how the weapons hold up under rigorous testing. Rather than call in reinforcements right away, they continue to tail the heroes and watch how the weapons perform in the hands of untrained users. If the heroes ever try to talk to or fire on the technicians, they immediately flee and call in other troopers to move in on the heroes’ last known position (See the combat encounter under section 2B).

 

After the battle Section 2A They Take the blasters leads to the events in 3A Blasters.

 

2B: They Leave the Blasters

 

   If the heroes don’t take the blasters, an ASP labor droid lumbers up and begins collecting the dead storm-troopers’ weapons. The labor droid speaks using only the words “affirmative” and “negative” and acts very stupid. In reality, though, the so-called labor droid is Essar, the assassin, picking up the experimental weapons for his private collection. He was alerted to the sudden availability of the equipment by his spy eye droid. Throughout his collection of the guns, he acts the part of a Teth governmental labor droid on cleanup detail.

   Again, the technicians watch and take notes as this occurs. Of course, they don’t expect to get any further data from a droid walking off with their experiments. Thus, when it becomes clear that the “labor droid” will walk away with the weapons, they call in reinforcements, requesting storm-troopers to apprehend the ASP droid—and the heroes, as possible confederates in an attempt to steal Imperial property.

 

 

 

Technician Statistics…

 

Technicians     (4)

 

Brawn 2              Cunning 2

Presence 4        Agility 2

Intellect 2           Willpower 2

Skills: Astrogation 1, Computers 1, Mechanics 2, Vigilance 1

Talents: none

Soak/Defense: 2 / 0

Thresholds: Wounds 12

Abilities: none

Equipment: Holdout blaster (Ranged [Light]; Damage 5; Critical 4; Range [Close]; Stun Setting), tool kit, emergency repair kit, comm link

 

 

Combat Encounter:

 

The Technicians will hide behind cover and only shot back when they have storm-trooper support. A single squad of six troopers will come to the Technicians aid, two rounds later. Set the combat encounter out as you see fit. The ASP droid will get clear of the combat area and leave the PC’s to fight the battle.

 

After the battle Section 2B They leave the blasters leads to the events in 3B No Blasters.

 

 

Scene 3: Droidspeak

 

Continue following the separate A and B tracks from Scene 2, as the heroes engage the droids of Teth more closely.

 

3A: Blasters

 

 

   If the heroes have the inhibitor guns, they’re soon approached by a blue-tinted, timid 3P0 translator droid. The droid first tries to communicate in the native languages of any aliens who may be among the heroes’ group, resorting to Basic only if the characters insist. The droid would rather speak in an obscure language, however, to deter eavesdropping.

 

Pardon my intrusion, sirs. I am T-3P0, a translator droid. My master couldn’t help but notice that you have acquired some unusual ordnance. I am authorized to purchase it from you. I can offer you 300 credits each for those eight blaster rifles—an excellent price, considering their purloined nature.

 

   The droid doesn’t have the money on hand, but T-3P0 assures the heroes that if they accompany him back to his master’s workshop, they can make the exchange there in privacy.

   Though fishy, the offer is legitimate. T-3P0’s master is Essar, who has quickly learned from droids in the area that the heroes stood up to the storm-troopers and took their weapons. Essar has no intention of double-crossing the characters or setting them up for an ambush. He genuinely wants to pay 2400 credits for all the guns.

   If the heroes accept T-3P0’s offer, he takes them to the assassin droid.

 

The T-3P0 unit leads you to a ramshackle garage several blocks away. The inside is dark and dingy, but a battered ASP labor droid dominates one of the back corners of the garage. In a surprisingly fluent voice, the droid says, “Please, enter the chamber. I understand you’ve caused some storm-troopers to miss their mark today. Good shooting. I’d like to be the first to congratulate you.”

 

   If the heroes enter, the 3P0 unit closes the garage door, casting them into near darkness. Essar has no need for lights and forgets that non-droids need it to see. Lanterns are available if the heroes request illumination.

   Essar is a friendly, even cordial droid, who somehow manages to relate everything to guns. All his metaphors are gun-related, which makes even casual conversation sound threatening. He means no harm; Essar is just overly fond of guns and sees everything through cross-haired glasses.

   If asked, Essar explains nearly everything about his current assignment. He can tell the heroes that he is on-planet in the hire of an underground droid resistance, and that he’s set his sights on the governor of Teth, to blow apart his anti-droid sentiments. As a professional and a collector, he is quite interested in the strange new guns that the storm-troopers seem to be packing.

   Essar is very patient in answering questions, but after each inquiry, he brings the conversation back to purchasing the blaster rifles. If the heroes firmly refuse to sell, he turns cold and asks them to leave. Before they open the garage door, he reminds them, “Those guns will be missed more than you will.” The adventure continues from scene 4.

 

3B: No Blasters

 

   If the heroes allow the “labor droid” to walk away with the blasters, he does so—until his curiosity gets the best of him. As Essar trudges away, he looks back and beckons with a mechanical claw for the heroes to follow. If they ignore the entreaty, they have about five minutes to travel, make plans, or get away before the technicians explain what happened to their superiors and the appropriate storm-trooper reinforcements pinpoint their location. The heroes have what their patron sent them for, information on the new blaster rifle setting (the astromech droid with the weapon information), they can get to their ship or other safe-house before the Imperials arrest them. The adventure can end at this point.

   However, any adventurer worth her blaster will want to know what a labor droid has to tell her. If the heroes follow Essar, he leads them back to his garage hideout. Once enclosed and relatively safe, the assassin droid drops the ASP act and begins asking them animatedly about their direct experiences with these fascinating new guns. He wants to know what it feels like to be hit by one, how a Human would hold it, and any other experiential information that he couldn’t have gained by watching through a spy eye.

   As in Scene 3A, above, Essar will talk about himself or his mission openly, but he constantly brings the conversation back to guns. Keep grilling the heroes until the questioning gets dull or frustrating, then proceed to Scene 4.

 

Scene 4: Airtight Garage

 

   If the heroes have gotten this far, they’re in Essar’s garage. The garage is a large space, with enough room to park and work on two good-sized land speeders. The room is 60 feet wide and 40 feet long, with two bay doors that open onto an urban alley. Essar sits in the far back corner and seems unarmed, although he can produce a standard blaster rifle and six stun grenades that he carries hidden on his body.

   If the heroes posted a lookout, they know that ten storm-troopers have approached the building, and are not surprised when a demolitions charge blows one of the doors off its hydraulics. Otherwise, the characters are surprised when the door explodes and storm-troopers begin firing into the enclosed space.

   This might be overwhelming for the heroes if they didn’t have an assassin droid fighting on their side. In addition, Essar’s 3P0 unit is armed with and programmed to use a holdout blaster. While the translator droid isn’t a very good shot, it’s better than nothing.

   The storm-troopers here are no longer in “experimental” mode. Their blasters are set to kill. One fires at each hero, one at the 3P0 unit, and two concentrate on the wildly dangerous labor droid that’s busy tossing grenades.

   While not inconsiderate of the heroes, Essar wants the storm-troopers down and leads with his stun grenades. The droid avoids catching the heroes in the blast if he can, but he doesn’t sacrifice a good shot for it.

 

 

Use the map of the warehouse for this combat encounter that is provided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: THE NEEDLE IN THE HATESTACK

 

Essar, the droid that the storm-troopers are looking for, is disguised as an ASP series labour droid. Essar is an assassin droid who works deep undercover. For each mission, he has his central programming and circuits transferred to a different droid shell to ensure anonymity.

   Currently, Essar carries only two guns with him, as he didn’t plan to make a hit on Meno Blask today. However, the droid is a connoisseur and collector of various firearms from around the galaxy. He’s very interested in getting his mechanical grippers on Imperial weapon prototypes for his collection.

 

Essar S-R6 Assassin Droid or ASP Series Labor Droid                                                                                      

Brawn 4              Cunning 3

Presence 1        Agility 3

Intellect 3           Willpower 1

Skills: Coerce 3, Computers 4, Gunnery 5, Ranged (Heavy) 5, Ranged (light) 5, Mechanics 3, Melee 3, Pilot (Planetary) 3, Pilot (Space) 3, Vigilance 2, Adversary 2

Talents: Barrage 3 (add 3 to the damage of all Gunnery or Ranged attacks at medium or long range), Point Blank 3 (add 3 damage to all Ranged [Heavy] or Ranged [Light] attacks mad at close or engaged range)

 

Soak/Defense: 6 / 0

Thresholds: Wound: 15 / Strain: 10

Abilities: Droid, Immune to poisons and toxins

Equipment: Light repeating blaster (Ranged [Heavy]; Damage 11; Critical 3; Range [Long]; Auto-Fire; Cumbersome 4, Pierce 1); built in blaser pistol (Ranged [Light]; Damage 6; Critical 3; Range 20; Critical 3; Range [Medium]; Stun Setting), built -in missle tube (Gunnery; Damage 20; Critical 2; Range [Extreme]; Blast 10, Breach 1, Cumbersome 3, Guided 3, Limited Ammo 6), built in razor claws (Melee; Damage 6; Critical 4; Range [Engaged])

 

Upgraded Protocol Droid

 

Essar has found that having a translator droid as a valet and go-between has been a useful investment. Because the droid is in a dangerous line of work, Essar has upgraded the protocol droid to be able to handle himself in a fight, though he’s not a great shot.

 

T-3P0: Walking protocol droid

 

Brawn 1              Cunning 1

Presence 2        Agility 1

Intellect 3           Willpower 1

Skills: Charm 2, Knowledge [Education] 3, Knowledge [Xeneology] 3, Negotiation 2, Perception 1

Talents: none

Soak/Defense 3 / 0

Threshold: Wounds: 10

Abilities: Droid, immune to poisons and toxins, Etiquette and protocol (protocol droids allow allies to add 1 Boost die to any negotiation check)

Equipment: none

 

When the Smoke Clears…

 

Essar quickly thanks the heroes for their assistance and escapes with the modified blasters if he can. The last storm-trooper to fall would have called for reinforcements, if possible, so staying in the area is probably a poor choice.

 

Cue End Credits

 

   If the heroes leave immediately, they can get away clean. Their identities haven’t circulated to every Empire representative on the planet, and as long as they aren’t running and shooting everything with Imperial markings, they can probably make it to their ship and get away with minimal fuss.

   Essar can be a recurring figure for the heroes to encounter throughout their careers. Whenever he encounters them (always in a new droid shell), he recalls them fondly and always remembers the “inhibitor incident.” But the characters will never meet him in downtime. He’s always undercover as some other kind of droid, working to eliminate a target or add another new or exotic gun to his collection. If the heroes are of a mind to convince him, Essar might be willing to join the Rebellion’s cause, but only if it provides him with more opportunities to travel and collect new guns.

 

About the Author

 

Sooner or later you're going to wonder, so I'm telling you now. Jeff Quick is the former Senior Editor of Star Wars Gamer and Editor-in-Chief of Star Wars Insider. Now he's a game designer for Wiz-Kids Games. He lives in Seattle. These things are all as true as the sun.

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Thanks for the adventure, unfortunatly, it seems that some pictures should have been there, but don't appear :( I guess we can figure out most plans, or make up our own.

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