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CaptainTrek

Use of Observation Dome during warp travel?

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Well, in my group's current Rogue Trader game our frigate happens to have an Observation Dome, and we've been wondering what, if any, use it might have during warp travel…

Interestingly, our GM seems to think you can stare unprotected into the warp itself so long as the Geller Field is running, but even if that were true it seems incredibly unlikely to me that an Imperial ship would do anything other than button down every possible thing that could allow someone a view to the outside. The reason is obvious… Even if the Geller Field could allow for such warp-gazing, if there's a flicker in the field… well…

I, however, had another, perhaps more reasonable idea. Might there be panels that can slide into place over the dome that can, perhaps, project an image of the starfield one would see were the vessel in realspace? Something like this does seem reasonable if the Dome's "Cure For Claustrophobia" effect is to function, especially if the vessel spends a lot of time in the warp…

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Well it certainly stands to reason that there are armoured panels which will slide over the dome and give it some measure of protection, when the measures would be called for.

So yeah, there's nothing saying your Rogue Trader's dome has fancy hololithic projectors on the interior of the dome's armour, that can be used to replicate the skyline when it's closed.

As for staring in to the Warp, well I've always figured that's the kind of thing only the strong-willed, insane, and psykers could really pull off, without it eroding their minds. And of course, chaos worshippers. But everyone else (so nobody but minor NPC's and the occasional really weak-willed PC) would probably be at risk gaining an Insanity point or two, or staring too long.

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CaptainTrek said:

Well, in my group's current Rogue Trader game our frigate happens to have an Observation Dome, and we've been wondering what, if any, use it might have during warp travel…

Interestingly, our GM seems to think you can stare unprotected into the warp itself so long as the Geller Field is running, but even if that were true it seems incredibly unlikely to me that an Imperial ship would do anything other than button down every possible thing that could allow someone a view to the outside. The reason is obvious… Even if the Geller Field could allow for such warp-gazing, if there's a flicker in the field… well…

I, however, had another, perhaps more reasonable idea. Might there be panels that can slide into place over the dome that can, perhaps, project an image of the starfield one would see were the vessel in realspace? Something like this does seem reasonable if the Dome's "Cure For Claustrophobia" effect is to function, especially if the vessel spends a lot of time in the warp…

I think sliding panels are a likely option.  The other option is that the observation decks are simply closed off during warp travel.

I think you projected image idea is cool…so cool in fact I think is would have to be archeotech since it somewhat infringes on a navigators role.  A more low tech option would have the dome display an inspiring digital fresco of the emperors victories.

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The Geller field might create a barrier around the vessel that is impossible to see through, either in or out, just displays strange colored lights beyond it and so forth. The chances of accidentally peering into the warp for a mundane peon are too high for random portholes to be openable, unless the entire ship locks every porthole down automatically. I would imagine the field blocks all view in and out.

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Logically you would think that NO ONE can see anything, and the vessel is guided by the Navigators powers. Now since each Navigator translates the warp into his own images/experiences-- probably because of the human minds inability to comprehend some of its horrors and is trained to do this-- the Non-Navigator has ZERO chance of looking at the warp and not going nuts since his mind is not trained for it. So I think that when the Geller field is up IT creates a bubble around the vessel that it is not possible to see into or out of. It might even make the vessel invisible to warp entities. And when it flickers or fails, it becomes a wide open target for all those horrific things.

It would be interesting to see what has been previously written about this.

 

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Only the Navigator can see the warp, anyone else goes mad, becomes a host, etc.

All views are dark and should there be a windows (mind you I don't understand why a spaceship would have a window, that is anything else then a tv screen), it should be blocked and bolted…

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The ship simply shut off all exterior visuals. Why? It's simple for anyone who had Navigator, their simple powers of opening 3rd eye give insanity/coruption points later on deal damage, or kill outright weakwilled. The 'Red Tide' is killer move.

And Navis only watch the warp thanks to their special mutation.

 

And the working of observation dome, well as long as it dosen't show the immaterium everything will be fine and how it will be achived is up to personal interpretation.

Warhammer 40K is more user friendly than normal WH or D&D. Rules state that in tabletop gamming and the hero creation of RT also gives lots of freedom and interpretation of how some things work.

Only steampunk systems with their gadgets give more freedom.

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 It's stated in fiction that shutters fall on all exterior windows during warp travel. So that's what I've run with.

My view on the Gellar field is it's a barrier, not something that blocks sight. So the Navigator (and other people with the fortitude to) could see into the Warp without trouble. It's just… y'know, Realm of Chaos, so it's gonna drive you bibbly regardless of whether there's a field protecting you from it or not. Seeing something that should not be is usually enough to make people start questioning (so Lovecraft tells us), so I operate on that assumption.

It's like a horrible, horrible river that we throw water-tight capsules into.

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I think of warp travel like WWII submarines with the Navigator being the sonar guy…

 

it's all dark, everyone is scared… red lights all over the place. Everyone is praying those mines/deamons won't blow up…

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Black Library writer Dan Abnett mentions Observation Domes in a couple of his novels (I know of at least once in the Eisenhorn trilogy, and I seem to recall a mention in one of the Gaunt's Ghosts books, but I'm not positive about the latter). He says that a ship's Gellar Field does indeed block visual interpretation of the warp, reducing it to shifting patterns of color (I picture it as being like seeing an aurora borealis through a kaleidoscope while on acid…), which, while not mind-blasting like seeing the warp directly, are subtlely disturbing…

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In an ork campaign, when one of them went so far as to actually open an airlock, he didn't even get to observe the warp at all. Near instantly, the breach was covered by a greater daemon of Nurgle. Ended up having to vent plasma through and vaporising that section off the ship. Fate Points got subtracted.

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One of the battlefleet gothic books had the captain and command crew looking at a cogitator derived image, basically the computer taking the warp and breaking it down into icons and so forth so that the non-navigator part of the crew could look at it without going mad (though it was still described as being painful to the eye (I've always imagined it as a sort of three dimensional magic eye picture that moves….)).  This was important to the plot as the ship actually fought an engagement in the Warp (torpedoes only though) using a combination of this and the navigator (if memory serves).

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Adeptus-B said:

Black Library writer Dan Abnett mentions Observation Domes in a couple of his novels (I know of at least once in the Eisenhorn trilogy, and I seem to recall a mention in one of the Gaunt's Ghosts books, but I'm not positive about the latter). He says that a ship's Gellar Field does indeed block visual interpretation of the warp, reducing it to shifting patterns of color (I picture it as being like seeing an aurora borealis through a kaleidoscope while on acid…), which, while not mind-blasting like seeing the warp directly, are subtlely disturbing…

Yea, I don't go off the books to much.  Because the Eisenhorn trilogy also had warp ships that were crewed by less than a 1,000 people, and other such fluff.  Don't get me wrong, it's a great read and I thoroughly enjoyed it and recommend it to anyone and everyone to purchase.  But allot of the minute details in the books aren't exactly RT rule friendly.  Great inspirational work though.

Like someone else mentioned, I play it as the blast shutters coming down, or the area being sealed off.  Or, as in some cases, the dome is like a large land based telescope on Earth.  A metal hemisphere encasing a large telescope that can rotate.  Digital displays could also project what is outside the hemisphere and viewed through the telescope on the ceiling and/or walls, and could be turned off or (as someone else also mentioned) show something else programmed into the system.

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Adeptus-B said:

Black Library writer Dan Abnett mentions Observation Domes in a couple of his novels (I know of at least once in the Eisenhorn trilogy, and I seem to recall a mention in one of the Gaunt's Ghosts books, but I'm not positive about the latter). He says that a ship's Gellar Field does indeed block visual interpretation of the warp, reducing it to shifting patterns of color (I picture it as being like seeing an aurora borealis through a kaleidoscope while on acid…), which, while not mind-blasting like seeing the warp directly, are subtlely disturbing…

In one of the Gaunt's ghost's series there is indeed an observation dome that is occupied during Warp transit. The book indicated that the Dome was essentially tinted to filter out the worst of the warp visuals. What was left appeared to be a shifting Kaleidoscope of colors across the dome (If I remember correctly). In my games I have always played that all exterior portals are closed or blacked out by some sort of High tech tinting except the Navis Dome. The Navis dome is a Small Pod like chamber that extends away from the main hull were the Navigator remains for the entire warp transit. I have always envisioned the Navigator being Jacked into his station through some sort of MIU type setup that maintains bodily functions and allows near constant awareness while the ship is at warp. (Most of the artwork I've seen seems to support this.)cool.gif 

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I like the idea of physical shutters slamming down, with an audible clang, over view ports. These barriers should be formidable and sturdy bearing caveats in bright red letters that begin "INTENTIARE!", contain shrill, imperative language and are illustrated by icons depicting madness and death. During warp-travel cogitators and auspex simply relate non-sensical or outrightly deceptive (or worse than useless) information. The navigators' occulus is available observation dome for navigators, if I am not mistaken. Of course, the occulus must also be protected by the gellar field or it would be a constant weak point for incursion by warp entities. Maybe it is? For their purpose, I would believe the gellar field doesn't hinder normal vision, unless the navigator-gene allowing them to pierce this veil.

However, staring into the Warp by the uninitiated even through the tint of the gellar field would result in accumulating corruption and insanity points, along with of a kind of warp-viewing addiction. The horror: the more you look at it, the more you want to . . .

Ship-based Endeavor: A small band of crew-members who have deactivated the shutters in their section in order to view what lies beyond, perhaps as a test of courage, just simple curiousity, etc. Maybe they presume the gellar field will protect them? Eventually they are compelled to partake of a  pure, unadulterated eyeful of the Warp and take steps to make a small hole in the field; just for a peek, you know? A simple little peep. Just a few seconds-- What could happen . . .?

 

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