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Errant

So I have a cursed player.

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 We've gone through two different characters and about half a dozen sets of dice. Almost EVERY SINGLE TIME he rolls a failure. Usually in the high nineties. I kept track in the last session; Out of twenty-one rolls he made, 16 were failures of higher than ninety, 3 were successes, and the others were scattered failures between there. It's not the dice, it's not his style of tossing them, and he's starting to get a bit frustrated. How would you handle it? He's got two fate points. I'm tempted to give him more to make up for it, but that sort of invalidates the point of having a random roll for them in the first place.

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lol, dam I thought I had bad luck with rolls.  Whatever he did it caused the dice gods to curse him and they are fickle gods indeed.  I would advise fasting and prayer to the dice gods and beg their forgivness.

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I would say, do nothing about it. I have a "cursed player" within one of my DH groups. My poor lad (Jan Märtens) has the exact same problem. He grows frustrated as well. But what is one supposed to do? Bad luck is back luck.

On the other hand, if he has success, he roars in triumph about it. I understand that. He values every and any LEVEL of success he gains. happy.gif

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Dice do tend to run hot and cold.  Just deal with it.  Though you could give that character a few role-playing opportunities where he can succeed without needing to roll the dice.

Incidentally, I'm the exact opposite.  My dice tend to run hot.  Unfortunately for my players, I'm the GM... 

Cheers,

- V.

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You could offer complications for failed rolls.  If the player takes the complication, they succeed but have some disadvantage for some or all of the encounter/scene.  However, I wouldn't give any lasting penalties to rolls.  

As an example, a character is sneaking up on a group of scouts in order to close the distance and surprise them.  The player rolls a Stealth check but fails.  Rather than have the scouts suddenly notice the noisy character and open fire, you offer a complication to the player.  You'll let the character close the distance and attack, but he ends up dropping his weapon, stumbling and falling, or some other minor inconvenience. 

 

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let the guy take the talent Luck for 250 xp pts (Elite Advance)

 

D6 times per game session or module (DM decides on Luck pool refill time each game each milestone etc, DM eyes only, rolled being DM screen) the user can switch is dice roll a 95 becomes a 59, a 63 a 36, etc. This must be called before the roll and the player cannot know if he as luck pts left before the roll (nor should he be ever told if he as any in bank).

 

Then the players tell the two value and the DM says pass or failed.

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Errant said:

he's starting to get a bit frustrated. 

How frustrated exactly? Frustrated enough to sell his soul to the ruinous power in return for glory and fortune? You have a Dark Pact candidate here. He doesn't have to accept a daemon's boon but let him re-roll his dice for d10 Corruption Points each time he will bends his pride and cries out to the Chaos Gods.

What could possibly go wrong?

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 Take him to go get his dice blessed by a priest of his deity of choice. I recommend Finagle, God of bad luck and perverse situations (more commonly worshipped through his prophet Murphy).

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Make his bad luck appear in-universe. Then have him investigate it, only to find out that he's been manipulated his entire life by the forces unknown, his every step a move in pre-planned direction, "flapping of butterfly's wings" that caused a hurricane elsewhere. He can discover that he's one of the Afriel Strain, perhaps even clone of Macharius himself (they were notoriously unlucky). It's easy to forge a really good story out of this misfortune.

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Our most cursed player has luck like that too, ideally, just try to minimize his dice rolls (ie: dont' make him roll for stuff that he SHOULD just be able to do).  When it comes to things that matter, min/maxing (which I never advocate) may be the way to go, at least you can minimize the times a die roll in the 80's would fail (this includes full automatic weapons and a high bs for combat, stacking mods for close combat, etc).  In the end, the only time our poor friend really had good luck was on the Tabletop WH40k when his Lord of Change (which took blood and flesh from all of the modellers in our gaming group, **** spikey wings that just wouldnt' go one right!) was on the field.

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His still better off than one of my players, seriously, not once in three years did he have a good roll, by now he's taking it with humor, he asks if he can be the medic in the team *shivers*. In my whole gaming time i only had four near death accidents, one a trap from the GM, two times getting covering fire from cursed player (I generally prefer that he's up front from now on because of that), and once thanks to his medical attention, in all this encounters i lost a Fate Point.

I have a copy from other RPG, it has some stupid ideas (one seems to work, because cursed one has a 1 in a 100 chance of not totally screwing up).

1. For different heights one must roll clockwise and counterclockwise, to find out which one is better in high rolls and which one is better in low rolls.

2. Kiss the dice that are to be rolled (I recommend one checks if the dice are clean before attempting, also no tongue since it's only a business relationship gui%C3%B1o.gif)

3. Thoroughly wash the dice and let them dry in the midday sun to burn off bad luck.

4. Write the name Gary Gygax on a piece of paper, pull the dice from left to right three times for high rolls, and from left to right for low rolls (Currently the working one).

5. IF absolutely desperate, go to Gary Gygax grave, place your dice on top of his tombstone, and let them lie there for three full moon nights, to charge them.

There's absolutely no garanty that any of this ideas work, but he was so desperate he tried everyone except the last one (we're from Germany and he's not desperate anough to fly to America to try out the last one). They where fun to read, but if any of those actually works for you, well your welcome.

P. S. Gary Gygax is the inventor of Dungeons & Dragons.

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Since you seem to be serious:
Your player is not "cursed" or even "unlucky" in the sense that some supernatural force is influencing the rolls. That's silly superstition. Keep in mind that there are a lot of gamers and a lot of dice being rolled in the world. Some players will seem "lucky" or "unlucky" for a while by chance alone. Anything else is most likely confirmation bias.

(I'm as fond of decrying my bad luck and cursed dice as the next gamer, but I understand that it's ultimately just chance. Not counting unbalanced dice of course.)

 

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 Sounds like your friend has what we call a case of the "Bad Guy Dice".  Our GM was notorious for rolling poorly for his minions and we ended up always saying "The Bad Guy Dice are in full effect tonight guys!".  Best to just keep on going with those dice or get some new ones I know I own somewhere in the ballpark of 13 sets of dice and always seem to go straight for a certain set every time I play.  Slaanesh Dice (Pink and grey swirl colored) FTW!  

I wish your player all the luck with his future rolls!

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Another idea (which I have found working wonderfully after haveing been practised for a little while) is to imagine succedding on the roll, either ordinarily or spectacularly whatever one is comfortable with. This is best done both doing the wider game and the roll themselves. 

Cygni195 said:

1. For different heights one must roll clockwise and counterclockwise, to find out which one is better in high rolls and which one is better in low rolls.

2. Kiss the dice that are to be rolled (I recommend one checks if the dice are clean before attempting, also no tongue since it's only a business relationship gui%C3%B1o.gif)

3. Thoroughly wash the dice and let them dry in the midday sun to burn off bad luck.

4. Write the name Gary Gygax on a piece of paper, pull the dice from left to right three times for high rolls, and from left to right for low rolls (Currently the working one).

5. IF absolutely desperate, go to Gary Gygax grave, place your dice on top of his tombstone, and let them lie there for three full moon nights, to charge them.

There's absolutely no garanty that any of this ideas work, but he was so desperate he tried everyone except the last one (we're from Germany and he's not desperate anough to fly to America to try out the last one). They where fun to read, but if any of those actually works for you, well your welcome.

P. S. Gary Gygax is the inventor of Dungeons & Dragons.

We had another, one of my plyars ussually find useful: heating up the dice (ussually by rubbing his hands together with the dice between them)

 

probably the best of all is to try to stay positive, I have found that when one gets frutrated over the dice roll, not only does the game become less fun but the bad luck seems to intensify and escalate.

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A player in one of my games once snapped. Decided his dice were cursed so he went into his garage, put all of his dice into a circle, randomly selected one to place in the centre and smashed it with a hammer while screaming "DICE FOR THE DICE GOD!" He rolled fantastically after that - he knew that the dice had learned their lesson.

Personally, when I really, REALLY need to roll well, I offer to sacrifice a bull to Mithras, the Platinum Bull-God of the Persians. I haven't sacrificed a bull yet, but I figure Mithras is more or less out of work at the moment, so he can't afford not to give some divine intervention to someone who's calling upon him.

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Shrike said:

Some people have a habit of ordering the dice in their hand in a specific way - that, combined with a similar rolling style will cause the dice to seem "loaded".

 

Well someone should explain to the player he totaly FAILS at cheating!

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professor_kylan said:

A player in one of my games once snapped. Decided his dice were cursed so he went into his garage, put all of his dice into a circle, randomly selected one to place in the center and smashed it with a hammer while screaming "DICE FOR THE DICE GOD!" He rolled fantastically after that - he knew that the dice had learned their lesson.

Is the Dice God a fifth god of Chaos, or just one of the aspects of Tzeench ? I like this method, I've heard of one involving dancing naked on one leg during a full moon wrapped in top quality ham. But, I never dared to test it, as everyone trying it seems to have die...

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