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Crazy Aido

Rolling opinion thread of WHFRP 3.

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 Thanks for all that information Commoner, it is definitely helpful to see how people are running this game.

You know what I'd love to see, is some pictures of a GM's place space during combat or social interactions as the game is progressing.  I've tried to find videos of AP but have come up short. 

 

 

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I will try to get some pictures up next time I play, may be a week or two.  Honestly, if that's what you need to be convinced gran_risa.gif I'd do it happily (lol).  You did spark on a thought for me though, maybe instead of all this finger pointing, etc from both sides, maybe all this conversation would be way more constructive if we who love the game honestly just came out from behind the "you have to play it" defense and show how it is an RPG and what we love about it by breaking down what we see as its merits and how we use all these confangled gadgets to tell a great story.  Of course, some things get lost in translation, but I'll give it a try.  I love this game and I'd rather have more constructive conversations than a bunch of name-calling and hack-and-slash and people who basically love the same thing:  Warhammer.  After all, one of my favorite topics in the world is discussing Warhammer 3e and the way the system can work.  I way, way, way prefer that then getting dragged into the muck of 2e and traditional RPG'S versus 3e.  I'm not against old school gaming (though I doubt I can part with these wonderful dice), but I really do see a lot of merits the rulebook doesn't explicitly layout and a lot of potential I've discovered through play. 

I'll give you a run down of my space and an actual play moment, with an eye to how I GM things rather than dice interpretation, etc.  This one I'm very familiar with as I've ran this homebrewed demo several times at my LGS.  This is going to be a bit long, sorry about that Peacekeeper (lol!)

Play-Space (at home and at the shop)

My Recipe:

We play on a 3 1/2 ft. by 5 ft table, running five players (off two boxes and two dice packs - which I swear isn't necessary, it is absolutely plenty of stuff, almost too much).  I sit at one of the two short ends.  Each player sits around the table, 2 on the long sides and one on the far end.  When we have six, we a foot long leaf into the table and add them in on either side. 

In the middle of the table is the party card with the tension meter side facing me, the talent slots facing the player on the other short end.  The card is positioned far enough away from me I can reach it to adjust the meter and add fortune chips to the pile.  

The Players:

What the Players receive:  Each player receives 2 purple dice, 1 yellow dice, 2 white, 2 black, and the appropriate number of stance die based on their trait maximum.  Each player has a mini-box that they use to store their talent cards and chits in (between game).  The chits include their stress/fatigue/genral tokens (up to the maximum they can have in each).  Fortune chips are then handed to them to start the night.  They put their character sheets in front of them, talents above their character-sheet, their action cards on the right (they don't all do this, the lefty puts them to the left, but in general that's the layout).  Each player then puts their dice to their left side and roll in front of them or on their sheet.  Note, we don't use stance meters or have their career cards out during gameplay.  Players put a reckless or conservative die on their character sheet for each step they are toward the stance (so two steps, they would have two green dice on their character sheet).  The one player who uses the tracker keeps it above his sheet, next to his talents.  To represent which talents are attached to their career cards, players "tap" them horizontally, and the ones they aren't using they keep vertically.  Some just put the unused ones in a pile off to the side.  Some, put their action cards in a pile off to the side as well. 

My area (note, I am left handed): 

To My Left:  On the main 3x5  table, I put the four decks of small cards in this order, from left to right (miscast, insanities, wounds, conditions).  I do this in this order because that is how frequently each deck gets used.  Behind these four small decks I set up a horizontal 6 tracker with one event space (the prepackaged one from GM's toolkit is what I use now, it used to be an eight tracker).  This is designed for tracking on the fly.  I then place a vertical tracker a little in front of the Condition Deck that is seven spaces long with one event  token at the bottom in case we have to roll initiative. 

To My right:  On the main 3x5 I put my Location Deck.  On the right of the deck, I put three total chit containers (small round bead containers I use for my Arkham chits I picked up at a hobby store, I think they are 1").  Each one is full of different colored token (for the purpose of initiative, A/C/E, and recharge tokens should I need them).  On the far edge of the right side of the table, I have a tower of stackable, round bead chit containers (i think roughly 2" wide).  One is full of event tokens, the other is full of tracking pieces just in case I need to make a tracker during the course of the night.  To the left of the location deck, I keep a pool of the remaining white, black, and purple dice, to distribute/use as I need. 

Side Board:  I do use a side board.  It is roughly 2x2.5.  On the side board, I have the GM screen set up.  To the right of the screen I keep 3x5 notecards of pertinent facts (such as names/etc).  On this same side, I place 6 blue, 3 red, 3 green and 2 yellow dice.  On the left of the screen I keep any form of tracker (including the Nemesis organization trackers/storm trackers if I don't want them seen by the players during the course of play.  Behind the screen, I keep an hourglass token next to the on-screen tracker just in case I want to track something (like time) during the course of the game and keep it secret from the players).  In addition, I add a small notepad to keep track of important information, such as monster wounds, A/C/E sometimes, or the general what-not that's going on through the course of the game.  

Changes based on play:    If a tracker (such as the storm tracker) is pertinent or I have explained to the players what the tracker "represents" and it is a tracker that will run the course of the game - sometimes even a Nemesis  Organization Tracker - I will place this tracker in front of the location cards.  Any other tracker, that is not being tracked over nights of play or is a tracker(s) designed for a single event, act, or scene I will place them between the party card and me (however long they may be).  These trackers are set up before concluding a rally step and I will explain, before play begins what the tracker means.  

Example of Play

Inititial Set-Up:   This is the opening scene of the game.  My group of Brash Young Fools have accidentally, over the course of a loud, boisterous party, have accidentally broken through the floor of the inn and landed in the sewers below.  Each player would make an Endure check.  Success results in the Staggered Condition.  Success with boons, they successfully dodged the crumbling ruins and get no effect.  Failure means wounds and staggered, failure with banes means one critical wound and staggered.   In the case of success and banes it means (staggered and fatigue - a softer blow.).  As the dust clears and the character's come to, through the dark they see an endless sea of black eyes staring at them.  They find themselves surrounded by a horde of Skaven who, after being suprised by the breaking floor, scramble for the attack.  The players yell run!  Rally Step. 

During the Rally Step, I set up a tracker.  For something like this I would typically do a straight horizontal six tracker with one event space (it could obviously be bigger depending on how I want the scene to play out).  I explain to the players before the scene begins, to escape the Skaven they need to successfully get away from them or defeat them.  If they reach the end of the tracker, they will have successfully escaped.  Players agree, I give them a moment, and we resume play.

Aside about the mechanical choices of the scene:

At first this may sound strange or you may simply say, ew, that sounds horrible concerning the tracker!  I get both reactions.  I had both reactions before I started playing it and got used to it.  So let me explain a little why the tracker is sooo good here.  First, it establishes a level of understanding between player and GM what the scene is about...it's about getting away more than the fight (player's choice - but some times it can be GM choice and good description always reinforces that point).  Secondly, the tracker is nothing new than any other escape sequence, except it gives you a quick and easy way to move the scene with the players "on board." It is a great way, instead of arbitrary decisions of when they manage the escape or a set number of rounds (which a tracker can do as well) to structure the scene.  It gives you a place to focus and understand, 100% of ways to add tons of detail to a scene.  The ultimate reward though of a good tracker is to let players, who are not combat focused, find new ways to participate in the combat and actually feel like they are "doing" something even if they can't a boat load of damage.  It gives them freedom to use craftiness, ingenuity and role-play to get a point across.  

Since the tracker here is being used it gives tons of flexibility to the system and situation.  Lets say the players change their mind and decide to stand their ground.  Then simply, you can use the tracker to tell how much they have to fight to break the Skaven (even though you may want to extend the tracker then to show how hard the fight is) and send them running.  You can also add emphasis to the escape scene if you want to, by lowering the tracker down a step.  For instance, lets say the Human: Hunter goes unconscious, to reflect the new difficulty, knock the party's progress back one step.  If its the Slayer, you could even do two.  That's only if you want the possibility of capture to be a possibility.  If not don't do it at all!  But you can drastically change the event by simply moving the tracker back passed the starting point.  It's a great a indication the scene now changes, call a rally step, adjust the scene as needed.  Rally Steps are great even though I hated the idea at first, because it does build tension as well as give the players a chance to "freak out" enough that they focus more heavily on the situation.  I don't know how many times I've grinned as I listen to them say, "man, we are so screwed!"  I have no idea how we're going to get out of this one alive, waiting in the anticipation to see it all play out.   

Putting it all together:

Since this is an example from a demo I run at my LGS from time to time, I'll highlight the major points of the play and how the tracker gets used. 

So the players are in the pit and the Skaven are pouring in around them.  The party consists of a Hunter, Troll Slayer, Student, Commoner, and Dock-hand.  At this point, the Skaven are all henchmen so I have five henchmen groups (one for each player) consisting of four skaven a piece (to add a lot of pressure to the need of escape).  On my side board, I will keep track of their A/C/E in five piles.  The piles start out empty and I add tokens as they are used.  If I fear I may not be able to manage it there, I put it above my location cards on the right side.  Normally, I write down each group/monster on a piece of paper in a grid to put the tokens or hatch marks with pencil (using slashes for A, circles for C, and stars for E).  I use three different colored tokens to represent the three and add tokens to the pile as I use the A/C/E pools.  I use pencils when I have lots of groups to track. 

In this case, since they are henchmen, they usually only use basic attack, and since I know the card, I don't even bother getting it out.  If I did have a fancy card, I'd it out in the space in front of me on the 3x5 and put recharge tokens on it there if I felt like it (which I often don't.).   

As for the play:  The Hunter goes first and jumps up the hole, reaches down and pulls the commoner out.  The Slayer decides to cover their retreat and the Dock hand stays behind with him.  They take the heat as the Skaven pour in against them.  The Student barely manages to climb his way out.  At the end of the round, since over half the party is out of the hole and the Slayer and Dockhand willingly left themselves in the line of fire, I advance the tracker one space.  Now that the Slayer and Dockhand are overwhelmed,  The Hunter draws his bow and lays down covering fire to aid their escape.  The Slayer and Dock Hand manage to pound back a number of Skaven, and the Dock hand manages to escape from the hole.  The Student and Commoner grab a table and throw it down the hole into the horde.  Since the role-play choice is great and cunning and since they roll beautifully on the roll for the table throw,  I give them two advances right away on the tracker (one for the tracker, one for the roll) and the Skaven are delayed.  The Slayer, after getting a white assist from the Hunter who offers him a hand, the Slayer pulls himself from the hole.  The next turn with no checks, they run to the door and I advance the token to the event space.  But the door is covered in debris and as they begin to dig themselves out, they hear a thunderous boom as a rat ogre crawls out of the hole (the emergence of the rat ogre is due to the event space and to add dramatic tension).  I back track the tracker one space.  The Slayer charges and attacks it.  Now with the rat ogre I need an action card, so I pull out the card and place it in front of me in the center of the 3x5 and make a roll.  If it's over three recharge I take it down after use and choose another one.   If it's two or less, I simply tap it.  (The Cards are selected during the Rally Step, or simply put on the right side of the 3x5, on the right side of the chits so I can grab them quickly.).  The next turn I'll put out a different special action if needed or not. 

While the Slayer battles, other skaven poor out of the hole and the dockhand and hunter rush foreward, and after a successful round of combat they hold the Skaven back.  I advance the tracker one space, mid fight, back to the event space when the commoner notices a window across the room clear of debris (no roll is used as it is an event).  The Commoner and Student rush to the window and break out the glass, I advance the token one space.  After hearing the echoing shatter, the Skaven turn their heads and see them, clambering out the window.  They rush after them.  The Other's are too late to intercept them and the Student faces off with four skaven by himself (one henchmen group).  He manages to fell one, but is badly wounded (I deal cards to him for the wounds).  The Tracker does not advance again as the way is now cut off.  The Slayer drops three criticals on the Ogre and it begins to stumble.  I draw three crits for it and add the appropriate number of wounds.  One of the critical effects, cascades to draw a second critical, so I draw again.  The Ogre lurches back, holding its chest.  The Hunter noticing it is about to die, quickly takes a shot at the Ogre and drops it dead.  (Since the Ogre is such an important target and massive threat, I advance the tracking token two spaces to the left, one for killing it, and one for the shaken morale of the Skaven).  They reach the last space.  As the Skaven begin to scramble, the Dock Hand manages to save the student and help him out the window.  The Hunter and Slayer carve their path, they climb out after them, the scene concludes with their successful escape.   

Conclusion

Sorry that is a very long winded example, but you wanted a video and I gave you an old school video, you know, text.  The best I could on such short notice (lol).  Hope this helps.  Any questions let me know. 

I am just a huge fan of the game.  My one complaint about all the manuals is they are full of fantastic tools and we get a basic idea of how to use them, but with no actual play examples...of how to advance trackers; how they actually play out in game.  I feel the manuals have a lot of great ideas and are conceptually spot on, they just need to be broken down a little more into practical use.

If I had the Assistant Producer Job, I think it would be a great to include them in future supliments to the game.  gui%C3%B1o.gif

 

 

 

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commoner said:

The Gathering Storm took us 12 4 hour sessions.  I don't know if that's standard, but the players at my LGS are very good at modules. 

That's pretty much exactly what it took us.

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commoner said:

I believe I just created The Great Wall of Text!  LOL!  Sorry guys.  I think I see why no one has done this before.  LOL! 

 

No kidding! Thanks though. I'm on my way out the door today but I'll be looking over that post later .

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I put the monster cards up at my gaming blog, Stuff for Nonsense. I posted them here a long time ago, but I think I've updated them since then. Feel free to DL them and use them if you find them useful. I put up the one that's half henchmen group and half monster, but if anyone wants the double henchmen or double monster card, let me know.

I'll take some pictures the next time we play of my own station. Our table's a pretty busy place because we also use cardboard buildings and miniatures, too. I do have some table pictures; maybe I'll post them later. :)

 

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Thanks for taking the time to write that up Commoner.  I too love the game for all the reasons you've said and have taken to tapping cards as well instead of counters.  

I was very skeptical of 3e at first but after 1 session I was hooked.   The biggest benefits we have seen are that the components allow us to keep the mechanics on the table at a quick glance.  They also draw our attention to critical areas and help build tension as well as create a sense of relief.  Wound cards feel so much more visceral when they are stacking up and look all the more rewarding when you deal them to an opponent.

The dice mechanic helps to keep things more interesting then pass/fail and as a GM creates some surprises for me so that I don't always have all the answers up front on every situation.  The trackers server many functions from simple indicators for supplies to initiative to building tension in a scene.  Yet they are so independent of what's going on.  They are easily the most optional mechanic and offer great flexibility.  Beyond initiative just work them in as you see fit, don't feel compelled to use them at all.  But when you have that spark of genius where a tracker could help you've got it.  And when used successfully, it helps create new ideas for using them.

One way we've started using them is for tracking ammo, when we want to make resource management a tension building exercise.  So the archers have a tracker of 10 spots.  Each time they role a star they advance the tracker (broken arrow).  Each time they role a comet they push it back (retrieved an arrow).  These are just supplemental effects to those dice results they also carry their regular effects.  If you wanted to increase the ammo changes use boons/banes.  Simple but effective way of tracking shots, without the worry for actually tracking arrows and then figuring it out after the fact for how many were broken/salvaged etc...

Generally speaking 3e has refreshed our view points on roleplaying games.  It has created that new feeling that flipping to no other system has done.  The game components are unique and it has caused a lot of us to break out of our patterns and do things differently. 

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Llanwyre said:

I put the monster cards up at my gaming blog, Stuff for Nonsense. I posted them here a long time ago, but I think I've updated them since then. Feel free to DL them and use them if you find them useful. I put up the one that's half henchmen group and half monster, but if anyone wants the double henchmen or double monster card, let me know.

I'll take some pictures the next time we play of my own station. Our table's a pretty busy place because we also use cardboard buildings and miniatures, too. I do have some table pictures; maybe I'll post them later. :)

 

Nice, those are similiar to what I was considering, I think (for my use) I'd shrink down the tick boxes a bit to allow me a ring of action boxes around them (8 for the generics plus a couple additional for NPC-specific actions) so I can tick recharges on them.

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keltheos said:

Nice, those are similiar to what I was considering, I think (for my use) I'd shrink down the tick boxes a bit to allow me a ring of action boxes around them (8 for the generics plus a couple additional for NPC-specific actions) so I can tick recharges on them.

 

Yeah, that makes sense. I'd love to see yours when you get them done. Honestly, I can't recommend the monster sheet inside wipe-off sleeve approach enough. It simplifies things, doesn't take up much room on the table, and is relatively hard for the players to make heads or tails of when they sit across from it and it's upside down, so it's not such a big deal if things sneak out from behind your screen.

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Kryyst said:

Generally speaking 3e has refreshed our view points on roleplaying games.  It has created that new feeling that flipping to no other system has done.  The game components are unique and it has caused a lot of us to break out of our patterns and do things differently. 

Absolutely!  3e's blatant split from the traditional model I believe is what polarizes the community so much about it.  I am sure if it went from percentiles to d20+ a number, the effect would not be blowing people's minds this much.  What I love is not only does it cause me to break patterns, but allows me to use mechanics to create new and very dynamic ways to not so much generate the story, but to reinforce the story.  The dice simply reinforce characterization, they build tension and drama within the story...adding to the event rather than detracting from it and create new avenues to take that conflict.  Trackers mechanically focus the narrative down to what the scene is trying to achieve so everyone is on the same page, so the scene can play out better than it could without them.   Events, conflict and benefits a flat roll does not actually offer.  Honestly, I never liked dice pools before, finding them to be sluggish and interfering.  However, the depth of information the dice pool communicates in this system makes the trade off worth it.  I do like your ammo tracking idea.  Right now the characters in my home game are short on ammo, so I think I'll use this to track their bullets.  Sounds like great fun!  

Happy gaming 

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Nope, Commoner, I'd still have been ticked off it it had gone to a d20 system. FFG would have then been conformists to the industry. gui%C3%B1o.gif

Initially, my issues with 3e were few, but the further I familiarized myself with the game and demo'd it for friends and in my game store, the further I got away from liking anything about it.

I actually learned how to play 3e before I learned 2e, so I'm not a 2e hold out either. Luckily, I had some good joss finding a ton of the 2e books on the internet for reasonable prices and picked up the rest at used book and game stores.

I'm happy for those who do enjoy the new system, but I felt too much like I was playing a board game with all of the counters, cards and unconventional character sheets. If I wanted to do that, I'd play Descent, Road to Legend.

For me, RPGs come down to books, pencils, paper, dice and possibly a map and minis. I don't need the other crud, nor want it.

I had similar issues when TSR launched the Dragonlance Saga Edition system. It just doesn't fit my view of an RPG.

I agree that 3e IS an RPG, but just not the RPG for me.

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It always kind of freaks me out that so many people who hate this game admit that they were the ones demoing it for others at their local FLGS. :)

LeBlanc, are you playing 2e now?

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Llanwyre said:

It always kind of freaks me out that so many people who hate this game admit that they were the ones demoing it for others at their local FLGS. :)

LeBlanc, are you playing 2e now?

He is playing Pathfinder, that's what all the cool kids rebelling against new systems do.

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Congzilla said:

 

Llanwyre said:

 

It always kind of freaks me out that so many people who hate this game admit that they were the ones demoing it for others at their local FLGS. :)

LeBlanc, are you playing 2e now?

 

 

He is playing Pathfinder, that's what all the cool kids rebelling against new systems do.

 

 

Ha Ha!!

Actually, we played Pathfinder last week, but most weeks we play Dark Heresy. Our DH campaign has been running for the last 18 months or so.

Are you looking for a group Llanwyre? :)

Warhammer Fantasy 2nd Ed is on the docket for play down the road, but right now we're fully in sci-fi mode. Also, the game store owner plays in the group and since we play at his store, he'd really prefer that we play games that he still stocks if he is going to be part of it. No biggie, really. We could always play on a different night somewhere else or just without the store owner. There are two other WFRP 2e campaigns that I know of playing at my local store right now so it's still fairly popular.

I wouldn't say I "hate" WFRP3. I find myself personally not compatible with this RPG product. I fully can see the merits of the game and some of the tools that come in the box, but I found it just isn't for me. I love the tracker and the abstract ranges, but most of the tokens, dice, character sheets and the lack of all of the spells and, talents and skills in a book really annoys me.

Actually, when it came to demoing WFRP 3e to my local store,  I actually had only brought the boxed sets in to show my group what came in the box and explain the basics of how the game worked, It turned out that a few small groups of people or individuals came over at different times that evening and made me go through a few run throughs. Most comments were the game seemed too simplistic or built for newbs. While I didn't necessarily agree with those impressions, I did feel that this game would might be easier for people familiar with other FFG games (Descent) to make the transition.

I personally feel that people familiar with "conventional" RPGs might actually have a harder time converting.

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I play to many different games to hate on anyone for their preference.  If you like Dark Heresy you should check out Eclipse Phase (completely amazing game and its free! robboyle.wordpress.com/eclipse-phase-pdfs/). 

Personally I've been having a lot of fun with WFRP 3e.  We play on a 24"d x 48"w coffee table (tiny) and still have no issues with space.  The components help be remember whats going on with everything while I am trying to do five things at once.  The flexible rules allow me to instantly adjust the dice pools based on character choices which give everything a much more fluid "alive" feel.  There is really a lot to like about it.  I feel most people who don't like it simply have an issue getting over themselves and what their cookie cutter concept of an rpg is.  Someone mentioned DragonLance Saga edition.  It is ironic that Saga and this system stay the truest to the name of the hobby - "roleplaying".  No other systems have been designed to aid roleplaying and minimize book flipping better than Saga or WFRP 3e. 

Side note: I'm not going to tell anyone what roleplaying is or isn't supposed to be except this one tidbit.  If you think LFR is roleplaying your doing it wrong gui%C3%B1o.gif.

The release schedule is slow and it would be nice if the listed future products like Wizards. Also, what has been included in the sets so far has been lacking.  Over half a year in and still waiting on basic stuff like a beastiary, religion supplement.  And don't get me started on how it seem like their plan for setting info is to randomly pepper it through each set instead of putting out a setting set.

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LeBlanc13 said:

Actually, we played Pathfinder last week, but most weeks we play Dark Heresy. Our DH campaign has been running for the last 18 months or so.

Are you looking for a group Llanwyre? :)

 

<snip>

 

I personally feel that people familiar with "conventional" RPGs might actually have a harder time converting.

Hah! I actually wouldn't mind playing with someone who sees RPGs very differently than I do. But I have a feeling I'd drive you crazy as a player. ;) I tend to play the most...impractical...member of the party, no matter what the setting.

I'm not sure I agree about the "conventional" RPGs thing. I've played both traditional and non-traditional RPGs myself and been happy with both, but it's not like I had any trouble settling into this system happily. For me, I just find this system more comfortable because I have a love-hate relationship with numbers and much prefer visual imagery for tracking things. (The Anima system, for instance, gives me an instant heart attack every time my husband opens the rulebook, even though intellectually I understand that the system really isn't that complex and even though I rather like the setting. NOTHING kills my impulse to tell a story like pages and pages of charts.)

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We're still back to playing pathffinderr:.  1.Scenarios..lots of scenarios 2.  vertical character advancement. Two things that wfrp3 is just too short on.  You can't have a wfrp3 campaign and have a GM with a life as well.  We played through everything else (including contest winner conversions from BI).  My players dont' want to be in basic careers forever and I don't want to be a GM without resources.

I still miss WFRP3's dice system, but I dont' miss the stack of junk on the table that is the rules accounting system.  We've got rules-heavy games or we've got rules-accounting-heavy games.  D&D 3.5 was rules heavy.  WFRP3 is rules-heavy accounting.  D&D 4e is the worst of both. WFRP2 was rules light..too light on the character-unique-ability-end. 

I believe that some evolution of the game will occur..or it will wither and die.  I don't want that.

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Emirikol said:

 You can't have a wfrp3 campaign and have a GM with a life as well. 

As a GM who works a 60-hour weeks most of the year AND who usually goes out both nights on the weekend...I beg to differ. :)

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Llanwyre said:

NOTHING kills my impulse to tell a story like pages and pages of charts.)

 

If you want to cure your chart-phobia, you should try Tales of the Arabian Nights: The Legendary Storytelling Boardgame.

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Herr Arnulfe said:

If you want to cure your chart-phobia, you should try Tales of the Arabian Nights: The Legendary Storytelling Boardgame.

 

Oh, yeah! I own that and have played it and rather like it. (Well, I used to like it. After you play it a few times, it gets boring.) But you're not really trying very hard to tell that story yourself; that's more like a Choose Your Own Adventure writ large.

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Llanwyre said:

Oh, yeah! I own that and have played it and rather like it. (Well, I used to like it. After you play it a few times, it gets boring.) But you're not really trying very hard to tell that story yourself; that's more like a Choose Your Own Adventure writ large.

We had to take a break after a dozen or so games, not because the stories got repetitive but because two players were having a bit too much fun narrating Alladdin/Sinbad slashfic. happy.gif

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 For me the extent of non-traditional RPG was Deadlands. The original game was AWESOME. I loved utilizing a deck of cards to be my initiative results. It was by no means perfect and I think we had a few too many people in the party at that time. I think we had 9 players and one GM. The old west feel of the game and the use of chips and cards was great. I miss that game. 

I think with WFRP2, I'm just bitter that I was playing D&D3 and 3.5 while that one was out. Now I'm kind of a "Johnny come lately" to a game that I felt was really good only to find it had been replaced with another system. I guess I wasn't ready to see it change to what it's become.

Anyway, I really appreciate the great conversation people!

This is the type of community that I'd love to be a part of.

 

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Along the lines of other games worth trying (while I wait for some more WFRP3 advanced careers):  I just started looking at Savage Worlds and All Flesh Must Be Eaten.

SW is a $10 rulebook.  I'd like to try out the Solomon Kane stuff.  Solid rules system.  Lots of convention play.  www.politedissent.com/archives/2093

All Flesh Must Be Eaten is the zombie survival RPG.  There's tons of stuff out there.  Lots of convention play.  Nice, dark theme.

 

jh

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Llanwyre said:

Emirikol said:ou can't have a wfrp3 campaign and have a GM with a life as well. 

 

As a GM who works a 60-hour weeks most of the year AND who usually goes out both nights on the weekend...I beg to differ. :)

 

No family then?  I've got to balance that.  Back in college, I had that kind of time.  :)

 

jh

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