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Werlynn

Mechanics for Scavenging/Salvaging

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What book has the mechanics for scavenging and salvaging? I see talents and other references to the activity in the crafting rules but I can't figure out what book they're in. I thought Special Modifications since the Outlaw Tech is a Technician specialization and it has talents about scavenging but no luck.

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I don't believe there is one, but here's what I do:

Scavenging: Difficulty based on how likely you are to find the good stuff,
Salvaging: Difficulty based on how damaged the object is,
with appropriate Setback (sometimes upgrades) based on circumstances. Base credits' worth of parts*success=total parts recovered.

Further, I use the Operational Costs houserules to which I add that Critical Hits cost difficulty*1,000 credits' worth of parts to repair (with a ship able to store sil*1,000 credits' worth of parts for free, with a cost of 1 encumbrance for each additional 1,000 credits' worth).

If you'd like more examples of how to set difficulty and base credits, I'll be happy to oblige.

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Posted (edited)

To elaborate on this further, the abstract "credits' worth of parts" can be used (with occasional exceptions) for crafting, weapon repair, ship hull repair, and ship Critical Hit repair. As well as potentially other things that are slipping my mind at the moment.

I generally would split it into Personal- and Planetary-scale, with Personal-scale salvage being valued in the tens or hundreds and used for crafting and weapon repair, with Planetary-scale salvage being valued in the thousands and used for ship repairs.

Edited by P-47 Thunderbolt

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Quite fortuitously, this supplement was recently posted to the Genesys Foundry. I haven't bought it yet but it looks like it may have exactly what you're looking for. Or at least a solid foundation to build upon.

 

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Early on in my GMing, I made house rules for a persistent spare parts pool. Repair and modding involve two checks; one against spare parts and the other a Mechanics check.

Adding to the pool through salvage is a Mechanics check with difficulty inversely proportional to quality and quantity of the material.

Here are the rules. Feel free to ignore, use, or modify as you wish!

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23 hours ago, Werlynn said:

Hmm. Thanks. It's really disappointing that it was left out. Especially from the Edge of The Empire line. Heck one of the newer books has a Scavenger specialization! Oh well.

Well remember it's a narrative-heavy tabletop system, not an open-world MMO. So a hard system of that nature would have to be developed at length to ensure it didn't get out of hand. And even then there's be whining that  it was "underpowered" in the same people fuss that the crafting system doesn't have a hard encoded method to make better stuff than you can buy off the shelf every time.

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But it's a game with a level of crunch and mechanics dramatically at odds with its narrative veneer. There are pretty crunchy mechanics for buying and selling and crafting things. A scavenging/salvaging system that they could engage the talent system into is a hole in the game given the rest of the crunch.

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51 minutes ago, Werlynn said:

But it's a game with a level of crunch and mechanics dramatically at odds with its narrative veneer. There are pretty crunchy mechanics for buying and selling and crafting things. A scavenging/salvaging system that they could engage the talent system into is a hole in the game given the rest of the crunch.

You are talking about a niche thing in a niche thing. I dont think they felt it was necessary

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1 hour ago, Werlynn said:

But it's a game with a level of crunch and mechanics dramatically at odds with its narrative veneer. There are pretty crunchy mechanics for buying and selling and crafting things. A scavenging/salvaging system that they could engage the talent system into is a hole in the game given the rest of the crunch.

This is also the sort of mechanic that is going to vary a lot group to group. Laying down the law of how to do it is going to invite more arguments and disagreements about whether to follow the RAW or houserule it to fit the table better. Especially when dealing with credits, this game tends away from dictating amounts of incoming credits, leaving it up to the GM to decide how many credits they earn and how quickly. If you lay down a "this is how much you get from salvage, and this is how long it takes" then it takes the agency out of many GMs' hands as they now feel beholden to the RAW rather than being able to make the rules fit for their table.

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16 hours ago, Daeglan said:

You are talking about a niche thing in a niche thing. I dont think they felt it was necessary

I don’t consider it niche—especially in Edge of the Empire where a lot of character concepts could have it as their bread and butter. 
 

16 hours ago, P-47 Thunderbolt said:

Especially when dealing with credits, this game tends away from dictating amounts of incoming credits, leaving it up to the GM to decide how many credits they earn and how quickly. If you lay down a "this is how much you get from salvage, and this is how long it takes" then it takes the agency out of many GMs' hands as they now feel beholden to the RAW rather than being able to make the rules fit for their table.

I apologize for giving the impression that I was talking about making credits out of garbage. I’m more interested in acquiring the parts for crafting.

I’m actually keenly aware of the dangers of shoving too many credits into a Star Wars game because it’s happened in the game I’m in. I changed characters and had my old one take his share out of the game, but I want my new character who crafts to not engage with the giant pile of credits if possible.

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59 minutes ago, Werlynn said:

I don’t consider it niche—especially in Edge of the Empire where a lot of character concepts could have it as their bread and butter. 
 

I apologize for giving the impression that I was talking about making credits out of garbage. I’m more interested in acquiring the parts for crafting.

I’m actually keenly aware of the dangers of shoving too many credits into a Star Wars game because it’s happened in the game I’m in. I changed characters and had my old one take his share out of the game, but I want my new character who crafts to not engage with the giant pile of credits if possible.

When you look at the system as a whole it is very niche. Yes some people may design their whole concept around it. That does not make it any less niche. 

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54 minutes ago, Werlynn said:

I apologize for giving the impression that I was talking about making credits out of garbage. I’m more interested in acquiring the parts for crafting.

I’m actually keenly aware of the dangers of shoving too many credits into a Star Wars game because it’s happened in the game I’m in. I changed characters and had my old one take his share out of the game, but I want my new character who crafts to not engage with the giant pile of credits if possible.

I didn't really think you were talking about making credits out of garbage. However, money is fungible and the money you would spend on crafting can be spent on other things if you get what you need through salvage. So the credit amount of the salvage still applies. If you get 10,000 credits worth of crafting parts, that's 10,000 credits you don't have to spend on crafting.

I'm not at all being critical of you, this is just to reinforce my point about cred-flood/cred-starve. I feel it should be up to the GM (and I imagine this was the impetus behind not including official rules) to determine how quickly or slowly and how difficult and time-consuming it is to "generate" credits.

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Daeglan said:

When you look at the system as a whole it is very niche. Yes some people may design their whole concept around it. That does not make it any less niche. 

We’re not going to agree. A crew scraping by on the outer rim. A cell of rebels who don’t have funds who want to furnish a base. A Jedi-wannabe keeping a low profile but wanting to make a lightsaber. It’s part of crafting, which the game already has many mechanics for. This is a gap in those rules—rules that specifically reference scavenging parts as an option.

Edited by Werlynn

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5 minutes ago, Werlynn said:

We’re not going to agree. A crew scraping by on the outer rim. A cell of rebels who don’t have funds who want to furnish a base. A Jedi-wannabe keeping a low profile but wanting to make a lightsaber. It’s part of crafting, which the game already has many mechanics for. This is a gap in those rules—rules that specifically reference scavenging parts as an option.

Not as much of one as you think. Many of those specs do have mechanics for it.  And again it may  be super important to you.  It has not really come up in any of the games I have played and I have been playing this game since the Edge of the Empire beta. So while you think it is important that does not mean everyone else has come to that conclusion. 

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I've only had a few campaigns were my players got heavy into crafting, which honestly in this system is kind of broken. If you look at how they changed it in Genesys, you can see FFG realized this a bit late with Star Wars, but I don't really mind as I'm just trying to tell an engaging story for my players and not kill them every chance I get. 

When it comes to scavenging for parts, as long as my players are looking for raw materials and have access to a junk yard or scrap heap or whatever, I don't even make them roll. It is just a matter of time investment. Your character spends six hours scavenging, and yes that means you can't help X player with their Streewise check or whatever. I don't normally do rolls, I just use it as a time sink.   Now I would probably handle this differently if the players were gathering all of this scrap to sell for straight credits, but I haven't had to deal with that yet really. 

The only times I do make players roll for scavenging is if there is a chance of danger, or they are looking for rare materials to craft a specific item. From what I can tell their aren't many items that require rare materials so this doesn't come up much. 

Not sure if this helps the OP but I figured I'd weight in with my experiences. 

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