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M_mortal

From D&D to StarWars

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So, to kick this off, I’m a complete beginner when it comes to the Star Wars tabletop. I’ve played D&D for years and learning something completely different is proving to be kind of confusing and difficult. I plan to be the GM for my friends and we have all the books, but I guess I’d like some help “dumbing it down” to where it’s easier to understand and get into. For example, I understand that this game doesn’t technically support multi classing, or so I understand from reading the books and other forums. But also, I’ve read that players can buy into other specialization that aren’t associated with their careers, which in my opinion is EXACTLY what multi classing is. To any who understand my dilemma, any assistance?

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Let's say you want to play something like a Healer (Life-Cleric maybe) you can start with Career: Colonist, Spec: Doctor.

But as soon as the game runs long enough to max out in Talents you want from Doctor and the Skills that go with it, everything you can get as a new spec will be something strange from a D&D perspective. If you stay in Colonist there is no other "healing" spec, but if you go to specs from other careers you actually can get more "healing" improving stuff.

Just try your best to get "classes" out of your mind when switching systems, because there are massive amounts of systems out there that are almost impossible to translate in those regards.

 

Maybe just start off with any of the beginners boxes and the adventures in them (they include pre-made chars). Take a shot at the System an try to wrap your head around all the other differences one at a time.

 

As a side note: I began my pen&paper experience years ago with a system without any classes. It was so open that you could try to literally do everything - although performing below average while doing so. And when building chars in systems with classes I still get annoyed over things that those systems prevent me from doing although they would fit the char 😄

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I would second the beginner box option.  They are a great intro to the game (which plays very differently from D&D), and they're pretty good value if you get the free PDF downloads as followup adventures.  They also come with dice, which are getting rare...

As for multi-classing...you can really do whatever you want.  Yes, by RAW there is an XP surcharge to dive into another specialization (a bit more costly outside of career), but it's hardly a show-stopper.  Frankly I don't bother charging my players *at all*, because it usually fits their concept.  Besides, you'll find if you stick too strictly to the specializations, most of them are kind of lacklustre on their own.

One other thing is that during character creation it's usually best to spend a much XP as possible on attributes.  The game is certainly playable without doing that, but you kind of have to get the whole party on board one way or the other.  The simple reason is over time those who spent on attributes first are going to vastly outclass those who didn't.

If your group agrees to spend on attributes first, then they should also decide whether they want to be broadly capable or one-trick ponies.  Unfortunately in this game the latter have a fairly short "fun span"...sure they might be able to pound the opposition into the dirt, but they won't be able to cross a rope bridge, if they can even summon up the courage to do so.  If you have a short campaign in mind, a bunch of one-trick ponies can be fun, but it can also get old.  Most species can start with an attribute spread of 3/3/3/3/2/2, which is about as generic as it gets, but they will still be differentiated by the skills and talents they take.  Some can start with (my favourite) spread of 4/3/3/2/2/1, which gives lots of good areas of competency, and some fun detriments.

But that's probably getting too far into the weeds...find a beginner game, run it with the pre-gens, and take it from there.

 

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So, Star Wars RPG has had several types over the years, but I understand that you are getting into the current FFG version. FYI, the last edition (Saga Edition) was a d20 system which closely resembled D&D 3.0/3.5.  Before that was the West End Games version (WEG) that focused on the d6 as the basic die type used for most things, as I understand it.  FFG actually re-released the WEG version this past year (I think), so enjoy your Star Wars whichever way you like it!  

Yes, you CAN "multi-class", or rather, pick another Specialization. And, as some have said, it is wisest to put most all your beginning XP in Attributes since you *cannot* buy them up with xp after creation.  After creation, you use xp to buy up skills and talents. To be honest, some perfectly good characters are had by just buying up skills (which you use all the time) and less of the talents (which usually only apply in certain circumstances).  In new D&D versions, sometimes that FIRST character is somewhat lacking because you didn't fully understand the system.  Not buying up attributes at the beginning is that mistake.  IMO, buying skills over talents is better to do for beginning characters because you'll be rolling better dice sooner. I always felt that talents felt like an xp-waste in my first few characters, but that's just my opinion. 

In contrast, the DICE are the BIG difference.  Imagine, if you will, D&D where you would roll a 1d20 AND a 1d8 on every check. The 1d8 being a sort of "luck" die that could be good (1-4) or bad (5-8).  So....you could "hit" and have something good happen (foe takes a further -1 to AC next round), or "hit" and have something bad happen (attacker off-balance, -1 to his AC).  Conversely, you could 'miss' and have the same good or bad thing happen just like with a hit.  That's what it'd be similar to. Plus, maybe a '1' would be major good luck ,and an '8' would be major bad luck. 

It takes a session to get used to them.  Yes, you can fail the check but something good may go your way or you can make the check but have bad things happen as a consequence.  It is not all hit or miss, succeed or fail. 

The players have a role in explaining the Advantages, Disadvantages, Triumphs, and Despairs.  This is more of a cooperative storytelling. With the combination of dice, there are A LOT of possible outcomes.  It is really everyone working together to tell a story. Lastly, as the GM, you cannot control the story as much. You have to be flexible. A great roll can turn an enemy into an ally. 

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16 hours ago, Daeglan said:

The kung pow chicken episode of thenOrder 66 podcast covers this well. 

It covers aspects of it but it's also kinda bitter about d20 as it casts d20 games/players as straw men "bad roleplayers" (but repeating they still enjoy the game).

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There really aren't classes in this system and Careers aren't really the same at all.  FFG uses the concept of Careers a lot to organize material (a book for each Career for example) but really it only has a minor effect on building characters.  You only ever only have one Career which you choose at character creation.  The only real limitation this places on you is that you can only purchase Signature Abilities from your career (powerful talent trees you can buy into eventually).  It also makes it a little cheaper to buy Specializations in your career.

It's easier to think of things in terms of Specializations rather than Careers.  Specializations belong to Careers (though some belong to none and are considered Universal, meaning they're considered part of every Career).

Specializations (and your Career) make given skills cheaper to purchase.  You can buy any skill you want but if it's a Specialization skill you can buy it a little cheaper.

So some of the barriers/features that multi-classing offers in d20 systems isn't really relevant - proficiencies, skill access, etc.  You can buy whatever skills you want - 5XP cheaper if it's in any your Specialization or Career.

Specialiations offer up Talents for purchase that give you the ability to do cool things - often involving skill checks - so players will seek out a specialization that offers Talents that match their character concept.

Some Talents exist in every Specialization (like the ones that boost your attributes) and some occur in many/serveral while others are unique.  Some (many) Talents are 'ranked' meaning the more you get the more powerful the effect.

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Parasiting this post XD I'm trying to convert from Anima Beyond to Genesys/Star Wars. But due I haven't found any direct conversion, anyone here know any one? Or maybe a two step conversion Anima -> d20 -> Gen/SW.

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Okay, I’ve read through some of the books. I have close to all of them now but now that I’m actually playing around with character building, I hit just a little snag. I think I’ve fully grasped the concept of XP point buying, but I’m wondering something about skill buying. If I want to buy additional skills that are part of a different specialization BUT are within the same career technically speaking, would I have to spend MORE XP for that skill?

Say I chose to play a Bounty Hunter (Gadgeteer) which doesn’t grant the Melee skill as a career or specialization bonus skill. Bounty Hunter (Assassin) DOES offer the Melee skill as a BONUS SKILL. I were to use XP to buy a rank in that skill, would I have to purchase it as a “career” skill or as a “non career” skill. 

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16 minutes ago, M_mortal said:

Okay, I’ve read through some of the books. I have close to all of them now but now that I’m actually playing around with character building, I hit just a little snag. I think I’ve fully grasped the concept of XP point buying, but I’m wondering something about skill buying. If I want to buy additional skills that are part of a different specialization BUT are within the same career technically speaking, would I have to spend MORE XP for that skill?

Say I chose to play a Bounty Hunter (Gadgeteer) which doesn’t grant the Melee skill as a career or specialization bonus skill. Bounty Hunter (Assassin) DOES offer the Melee skill as a BONUS SKILL. I were to use XP to buy a rank in that skill, would I have to purchase it as a “career” skill or as a “non career” skill. 

try oggdudes char gen. In another character generator thread, It will help it make sense. get the web instal from his about page

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35 minutes ago, M_mortal said:

If I want to buy additional skills that are part of a different specialization BUT are within the same career technically speaking, would I have to spend MORE XP for that skill?

Say I chose to play a Bounty Hunter (Gadgeteer) which doesn’t grant the Melee skill as a career or specialization bonus skill. Bounty Hunter (Assassin) DOES offer the Melee skill as a BONUS SKILL. I were to use XP to buy a rank in that skill, would I have to purchase it as a “career” skill or as a “non career” skill. 

Yes, more xp (the +5 extra beyond normal purchase). You career and spec gets you what it gets you.  Maybe it's bad wording, but those are your "career" skills.  I see what you are saying.  But look at it as: Career Bounty Hunter gets you "Athletics, Perception, P-Plan, P-Space, Streetwise, Vig, Brawl, & R-Heavy".  All BH's get them.  You "ADD" to your career skills those of your Specialization.  Diff Spec, Diff Skills added.  An Assassin isn't getting Mechanics, but a Gadgeteer does. But the Assassin gets Stealth & Melee.  It makes sense. 

One calculation that helps me is figuring out the costs.  To just get ONE skill you want, another career spec costs +20xp +5 more for the rank (25 total xp), but to buy a rank costs only 10xp (5+5).  To get TWO ranks in ONE skill?  Buy a spec: +20 for 2nd spec, +5, +10 = 35 xp.  Buy it as non-career skill?  10xp (5+5) + (10 + 5) 15xp = 25xp.  If all you want is two ranks in melee, then just buy it outright.  Save the xp. 

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