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Grey Jedi 9891

Negotiation help

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Hi all,

Been running a home brew campaign (my first time as proper GM) and had a few questions regarding buying items.

So my players have acquired some weapons and other bits and have been trying to sell them, but we were a bit confused at how to handle the dice results when negotiating the price as there are two places in the book (Edge of the Empire) where this is discussed. Unfortunately the dice got moved and reused before me and one of the players could discuss how we were interpreting the dice.

 

So negotiation is an opposed check and the results (from the book and how I would use them) are:

- 1 Success gives the players 25% of their asking price

- 2 Success gives the players 50% of their asking price

- 3 Success gives the players 75% of their asking price

- any additional Success adds 5% per Success

Advantage, Threat, Triumph and Despair give other effects which are discussed in the Negotiations Skill section (pg113)

 

Is this how you would use it or have I missed something? Would you make any adjustments to fit in better?

 

Edge of the Empire: Negotiations Skill (pg113), Rarity (Black Market Selling/Buying, pg149-151)

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Negotiation is only an opposed skill if you are running a narrative encounter. That is, in most instances, buying or selling gear should just be handled "off-screen" with a roll versus Rarity. It gets weird with selling—some people say to use the Rarity rules as is, others say to flip them so that you have an easier time selling something that is rarer. But the only time you need to make it an opposed check (seller's Negotiation vs. buyer's Negotiation) is if you want the encounter to be an integral part of the plot.

The reasoning here is that mundane buying and selling is boring and shouldn't eat up game time. Plus, requiring an opposed check every time a PC wants to buy or sell a stimpack penalizes face characters by opening every banal transaction to potential Despairs being rolled. Think Qui-Gonn negotiating with Watto versus Obi-Wan selling Luke's speeder. The former was an important scene, happened on screen, and led to interesting complications. The latter was done off-screen, wasn't really important to the plot, and in game would be handled with a simple Negotiation check versus rarity.

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Just dug up the dev ruling on the matter. Hopefully this will help!

Quote

Just got this response to  a question I had about buying and selling:

Question:

Hello! I was hoping you could clarify how buying and selling are supposed to work in both Star Wars and Genesys. If a PC wants to sell something he looted from a foe, and the sale is not a plot-critical moment, does this require one check or two? More specifically, does the PC need to make one Negotiation or Streetwise check versus the item's Rarity to find a buyer, and a second Negotiation or Streetwise check to haggle over the price with the merchant? Or is the first roll the only one required?

The rules on pp. 82–83 of the Genesys rulebook and pp. 157–58 of the Force and Destiny rulebook seem to imply that it's one roll versus a difficulty set by the item's Rarity, with uncanceled Successes increasing the sale price. But should it be two rolls? Roll 1, to find the buyer, Roll 2 to haggle over the price?

For one more level to this question, does the answer depend on the plot-critical-ness of the encounter? Haggling against a merchant makes selling into an opposed check, almost always opening the door to Despair. Is this an indicator that these sorts of opposed haggling sessions should be reserved for important plot moments, and not for simple looting and selling of enemy gear? Thanks for any clarification!

 

Answer:

The rules roll the “find a buyer” and the “sell the item” into a single check, which is why it becomes more difficult to sell rarer items (it’s harder to find a buyer with the kind of money/interest to afford the item in the first place). 

However, you do have a good point. If the negotiations are plot critical, you can expand the encounter out into two parts. One to find a buyer (which can rely on Knowledge or Streetwise checks, or even social skill checks as your characters talk to their friends and find someone interested in making the purchase). The second would be to negotiate a price, at which point you could make an opposed Negotiation check instead of a set difficulty. Simply use the same resolution for successes! 

Hope that helps!

Sam Stewart

RPG Manager

Fantasy Flight Games

 

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I don't know about the Edge book, but the Age/F&D versions specify that many of those mechanics/tables are for bulk purchases/sales rather than for individual items, so if they're just unloading a few random things at the local pawn shop (as opposed to finding a buyer for 20 tons of unobtanium ore or the like), most of those elements won't apply.

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On ‎7‎/‎8‎/‎2019 at 7:23 AM, Grey Jedi 9891 said:

Is this how you would use it or have I missed something? Would you make any adjustments to fit in better?

The buying and selling of personal items uses the Difficulty based on Rarity. Buying the price starts at list price, selling it starts at 25%. This is to make mundane shopping trips quick and easy and to discourage looting for dollars, as common items aren't worth their Enc. It doesn't matter where you buy some items, only that you buy them.

Example: Buying a new blaster and selling your old one.

 

The buying and selling of mission essentials is an opposed check vs. the NPC merchant/buyer. Price starts wherever the GM say sit does. If selling the Player can propose a price, but it up to the GM to determine if it can realistically start there (or even be sold at all). How much success/advantage/ect affects this is also up to the GM.

Example: Buying a replacement hyperdrive for your Nubian Space Yacht from the only vendor on Tatooine who has one in stock so you can get the Queen of Naboo to Coruscant.

 

Buying bulk items is similar to buying and selling personal items, but you also apply a multiplier based on the buying and selling location's rarity, and the GM can make further adjustments for localized rarity and wholesale pricing. This is a quick and easy method for players running commodities as a side-hustle. Exact quantities aren't really very important vs. the value. So like you can run a load of 20,000c worth of blaster pistols. It doesn't matter how many that is exactly, only that it's a bunch of blasters, worth 20,000 wholesale where you bought it, at Rarity whatever you bought it at. Note this is also where rarity adjusting affects like Black Market Contacts comes into play as you can tweak the rarity to help squeeze a little more profit out of it.

Example: Buying a load of Binga wood on Byblos for resale on Alderaan (since you're headed there anyway).

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I just want to give a quick 2ND to the comments. I do not give my PC's a huge amount of time to purchase/trade in session, but since I have 6 regular NPC's playing I give them plenty of time to text me in between sessions to make all the purchases and fair trading they want. 

That being said, if the players insist, I definitely will allow rules that you (Grey Jedi) have posted to be used in game.

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