Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ling27

Needed to vent, Stress rant.

Recommended Posts

//.start_rant.exe

I am ETSing from the Army.

Time is closing in on me. I've got to find a job within the next 80 days or so. So far, only one place has even offered to give me an interview, in the last six months. But they said only in person so that would cost like, 200 to fly there. Graphic arts jobs are hard to find, print production jobs are harder.

I keep getting told it'll be easier, but I cant just move somewhere without the ability to get a job there. That would be bad for the wife and daughter.

I have 10 days to clear unit + post before terminal leave starts.

I need to order more miniatures cases (got the first one in today, its great. Ferherr or something like that. Fits 2 VSDs and 3 ALCs perfectly.)

Need to look at house costs and rent costs for various areas.

Need to take down christmas tree and generally clean house.

Need to go grocery shopping.

...

Stress levels: above average. I try to maintain a level of calm.

Advice wanted.

Thanks.

 

- Ling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, advice let me think of something that is worth AT LEAST 2 cents (side note my phone doesn't have a cents sign ūüėĘ)¬†

Something that helps me when you have a very Stressful time is to break things down, instead of looking at your entire list and thinking "My life is going to pot!" Focus on one little thing at a time. I.e. right now I need to pick up the Kitchen.

K now I need to get the boxes for the decorations.

K now I need to take the decorations down. Etc.

 

Just focusing on the simple small things can help alot when you're feeling overwhelmed.

 

Another thing, don't forget to do something you enjoy! Take your wife out on a simple date somewhere or something, spend some time cooling off and reminding yourselves about what you enjoy in life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change careers.

Sorry for the glib tone, but seriously, there is no real income to be made in graphic arts or print.  The sad truth is that everyone fancies themself a graphic artist, and the field is so cluttered...

I got out of the Marines a 4611 (Graphic Artist). Worked a short time in that field, and then realized it wasn't what I wanted to do (drawing/being creative as a job was no fun for me) AND it paid crap anyway.

I know people say to find the thing you love to do, and do that, but that advice doesn't hold water when you have kids to feed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My cousin was in the Marines for several years and when it came time for him to move on, he was having similar issues. He lived with us for about a year and did some odd jobs trying to decide what he wanted to do. During that time he met a girl and decided he wanted to be a sheriff. He moved out, got married and is living the dream.

I have another friend who was in a similar situation, he ended up staying with some fellow former-servicemen while he decided what to do. Now he makes hats, married, kids, the dream.

Point being, don't rush yourself. If you know what you want to do, great. Relocate with some family/friends so you can get your bearing together and then make things happen. I'd be happy to host you at my place, but now my kids fill up all the bedrooms. There's also programs out there that focus on helping the military transition to civilian life. I found this on a quick Google search (https://www.military.com/spousebuzz/blog/2015/11/the-best-military-transition-programs-you-dont-know-about.html).

Best of luck to you in your endeavors. I know you'll land on your feet and get to run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yeah, and, USE THE **** GI BILL.

I'll say it again: USE THE GI BILL.

And in case you didn't hear: USE THE GI BILL.

 

So many people I work with coming out of college (RPI, U Albany) with, 40k, 60k, 80k in debt.  Go to online schools/community colleges. This is 2019, nobody cares what school that you went to unless you're a Dr./Laywer, something like that (it stinks of elitism).  All that it matters is you stuck it out and did the "College Dance". (College/education is a racket anyway.)  Don't worry about what your MOS or skills are/were in the military.  The most useful things you were taught, and that will transition to civilian life aren't your hard skills anyway, it will be all the soft things that employers at least claim to want: maturity, integrity, perseverance, communication, professionalism, improvisation, etc. 

Edited by Rocmistro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, clontroper5 said:

Something that helps me when you have a very Stressful time is to break things down, instead of looking at your entire list and thinking "My life is going to pot!" Focus on one little thing at a time. I.e. right now I need to pick up the Kitchen.

K now I need to get the boxes for the decorations.

K now I need to take the decorations down. Etc.

 

Just focusing on the simple small things can help alot when you're feeling overwhelmed.

This would be my recommendation as well. 

Pick one thing you can do and complete and do that thing. I like to start with an easy thing (unless the easy has to be done after some other thing) like getting a load of laundry in or doing the dishes. Builds momentum and confidence. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to thank you guys for the advice. It was stuff that I knew, but just needed to hear again from someone else I guess. I'll definately look into some other stuff other than just graphics and print, start looking around and seeing what I can do education wise and stuff like that as well. Ive gotten quite a bit done today, just waiting for orders to come in so I can clear other things.

Thanks a lot guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Ling27 said:

I'd like to thank you guys for the advice. It was stuff that I knew, but just needed to hear again from someone else I guess. I'll definately look into some other stuff other than just graphics and print, start looking around and seeing what I can do education wise and stuff like that as well. Ive gotten quite a bit done today, just waiting for orders to come in so I can clear other things.

Thanks a lot guys.

If you're looking for a new career I recommend learning a trade. CNC or other machining, welding, HVAC, electrician, plumber. If you can operate heavy machinery (dozers and backhoes) or something like that with all the fracking and such there are lots of jobs. CDL drivers and the like are needed. There can be some crazy hours though. I was hearing about someone who'd been on seven twelves but there is money to be made if you aren't afraid of getting dirty and want to work. 

The local large outdoor store and companion distribution center for online sales always needs people. The gun counter is always hiring ex-service members who understand handling firearms. 

Our company (machining) has trouble finding guys who can even pass a drug test then they don't have the math or patience to get through the apprentice program. 

Local construction and roofing companies always have more work than they can do. 

If you're just in need of a job for a roof, food, and heat there are plenty.

And if you have to leave some sort of military housing aren't you already moving? Does it matter if really if you're staying near the base or moving to a new city? Maybe a city close to your parents or your wife's parents?

And this: 

19 hours ago, Rocmistro said:

Oh yeah, and, USE THE **** GI BILL.

I'll say it again: USE THE GI BILL.

And in case you didn't hear: USE THE GI BILL.

 

So many people I work with coming out of college (RPI, U Albany) with, 40k, 60k, 80k in debt.  Go to online schools/community colleges. This is 2019, nobody cares what school that you went to unless you're a Dr./Laywer, something like that (it stinks of elitism).  All that it matters is you stuck it out and did the "College Dance". (College/education is a racket anyway.)  Don't worry about what your MOS or skills are/were in the military.  The most useful things you were taught, and that will transition to civilian life aren't your hard skills anyway, it will be all the soft things that employers at least claim to want: maturity, integrity, perseverance, communication, professionalism, improvisation, etc. 

Do not go into a lot of debt for schooling. You need some but that is as much to show you can stick with something and show up on time which your presumably honorable discharge should go far in doing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Rocmistro said:

That is 100% true. There is a speech by some admiral to naval institute graduating class. If you want to change the world, start by making your bed.

It is just the old saw about the journey of a thousand miles starting with a single step. It is a good speech. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Ling27 said:

I'd like to thank you guys for the advice. It was stuff that I knew, but just needed to hear again from someone else I guess. I'll definately look into some other stuff other than just graphics and print, start looking around and seeing what I can do education wise and stuff like that as well. Ive gotten quite a bit done today, just waiting for orders to come in so I can clear other things.

Thanks a lot guys.

And if you ever lose confidence, just remember good doggo and bike kid:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2019 at 12:17 PM, Rocmistro said:

Oh yeah, and, USE THE **** GI BILL.

I'll say it again: USE THE GI BILL.

And in case you didn't hear: USE THE GI BILL.

 

So many people I work with coming out of college (RPI, U Albany) with, 40k, 60k, 80k in debt.  Go to online schools/community colleges. This is 2019, nobody cares what school that you went to unless you're a Dr./Laywer, something like that (it stinks of elitism).  All that it matters is you stuck it out and did the "College Dance". (College/education is a racket anyway.)  Don't worry about what your MOS or skills are/were in the military.  The most useful things you were taught, and that will transition to civilian life aren't your hard skills anyway, it will be all the soft things that employers at least claim to want: maturity, integrity, perseverance, communication, professionalism, improvisation, etc. 

Great Danes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...