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Recommend Published Adventure for 50-60 XP PCs

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The group (of 5-6 players) I GM for has completed two beginner adventures and Mask of the Pirate Queen. They sit at roughly 50xp and between looting and job payments are getting fairly decked out (heavy battle armor, nice weapons with good mods, etc.).

I *DO NOT* have time to make up an adventure.

The published adventures don't seem to be "rated" on a power level (a la a D&D module that indicates its 'for X-Y players of A-B level').

So can anyone recommend a published adventure that will present a challenge to a handful of relatively "veteran" PCs? We 'play' Edge but use all the books, so not opposed to a Rebellion or Force adventure if need be.

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Hmmmm 8 hours in and 18 views (including mine).... tbh I have the published adventures as a collector/completist reason,,, we stopped playing about 18 months ago.... I have only really played FFG SW not GMed so my advice would be check out other threads regarding the published stuff or even other RPG forums...

 

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You're right; there's no "power level" rating in this game. The true answer to your question of which published adventure might be suitable for your party is "any of them." If your PCs are getting powerful, you might just have to play it by ear a bit. Start an adventure like, say, Beyond the Rim, and see how they fare in the first encounter or two. If it's too easy, start adjusting on the fly and adjusting during prep. Things you can do on the fly include adding minion groups or additional rivals to combats (always a valid use of a Despair, but something you can just do to equalize the playing field if you choose). Things you can do during prep (that are still not that time-consuming) are giving your threats better armor or gear themselves (but perhaps still below what your PCs have so they don't loot).

TL;DR: The game should have a slower power-creep curve than level-based RPGs, so you shouldn't have to adjust too much to keep your PCs challenged. Just add threats or upgrade threats if you feel things are going too easy for your group.

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For published adventures, I've only ever ran the beginner games so I might not be the best judge. Generally as @SavageBob said, this system isn't level based, you just add threats. A good rule of thumb for minions is group+1 and a rival or two at least. Though if your players are gear heavy, you might want to do a little more than that per group, or add in an extra rival or two.

 

Another option is splitting minion groups into two; they'll have a less powerful dice pool when shooting, but won't all die to your heavy gunner in one shot since they are separate targets now.

 

Also, don't be afraid to damage or break gear. It can always be fixed or replaced.

Edited by TheGuardian118
Typo

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As noted you'll have to beef up the other adventures.  Be sure to add setback consistently (each test should have at least one), and upgrade, or even increase, the difficulty of skill tests, maybe buff Soak by 1, and increase Wounds by a small amount.

I feel the need to address the "I don't have time to write adventures" comment, it can take less time than you might imagine.  I spend far less time prepping my own games than reading through those darn modules...which I inevitably end up changing anyway so it fits the campaign, or just because the module writers sometimes make mysteriously poor decisions.

So I spend maybe 20-30 minutes prepping, and write maybe 5 bullet points of key ideas or scenes I hope to hit, and that's about it for a session.  On occasion I might spec out a major nemesis, but only the ones they might meet infrequently.  The rest I just wing, because all the minions, rivals, and skill challenges can be reduced to a basic chart and then tweaked depending on how "balanced" you want the encounter to be.  Encounter balance is relative to the PCs, so the general rule of thumb for an encounter where you expect the PCs to triumph, but not easily, is to make the difficulties on average 1 less than the PC's positive dice pool, and make sure the NPCs deal less damage (after Soak) than the PCs can.

If I need maps, it's usually just a quick sketch of a large area, because if you're playing on a 24x36" grid mat, you're doing it wrong.  Star Wars scenes are about movement and lots and lots of space.  Besides, there are plenty of images/maps/inspiring material online that can be printed and used on the fly, which I then draw on a whiteboard.

Lastly, if the players veer totally off my planned path, or if they get through everything faster than expected, a great tool is "Rory's Story Cubes".  Just roll a couple of these and let the wheels turn.

There are also lots of resources online on how to GM on the fly, well worth the read because of the time they will save you in the future.  And I will say that some of my best sessions started with no prep at all.

Once you've run a few of the existing modules, don't be afraid to give it a shot.

 

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Beyond the Rim is a decent enough adventure and in all honesty will probably tide you over. I was absent for the sessions that was run but it's a decent enough from what I believe. The Jewel of Yavin meanwhile effectively a mostly skills based heist; that is one that only really works if the players are fairly seasoned and know what their area of specialties are, 50/60xp doesn't cut it for me.

There are also a few scummy adventures in the Hutt books, though they are very much designed to be a plug and play, or a stocking filler then an outright adventure in their own right. There was one that referenced a Glan Nopa, that was short and fairly easy for our players; the main difficulty was not appearing *too capable* to be scouted out again in future. This didn't quite work as  the Hutt we beat hosted a grand, GRAND Gran Nopla, which had like 16 teams. It was the best prep for an adventure that the DM didn't run; our PC's knew full well if we entered that arena willingly, we were entirely at the Hutt's whims, so we staged an auction for the Olderan crest right in the middle of their setting and started a small civil war that ultimately destroyed the space station we were in and put us down onto the planet; we were going through the GM's materials but we the players had equalised the field so it became a matter of our personal capabilities, rather then what those slimy fellows wanted us to do. Also served perfect cover for an assassination, which is why my PC was there.

 

I do mirror the others suggestions. In terms of pure edge content you probably have only another two adventures left really; unless you want them to start taking a huge interest in force and destiny stuff or AOR your going to reach a point where there won't be enough material for a sustainable, believable campaign. That isn't to say you should start plotting out 3-6 sessions epics in very high detail; just spend a little time drafting out a job, make a note of the major obstacles and with a bit of impromptu scene setting you can start creating entire sessions out of a single A4 of one line notes.

In short, what is your players careers? What is their occupation? Are they pirates? Smugglers? Merchants? Why are they doing what they do? What other motivations do they have? Or don't they have motivations? Do they have obligations? If so, to who? If you can't answer those questions then you need to ask them otherwise you won't be able to generate plothooks for future sessions, and we cannot give very constructive advice until we know more about the occupations and drives of this particular band of people. No, being adventurers isn't a career unlike DnD, it's a state of being created by unfortunate circumstance. XD

Once you have people invested in the world you are trying to create then they can start specifying things that they want to do; such as killing the Bounty Hunter that killed a character's father, very western themed. Another might be an ex-corp guy who wants to get back at the company that shafted him. Maybe eventually they will come across some very dangerous information, like the footage of a imperial weapon wiping out an entire planet that might prove to be profitable if sold to the right people, but might result in a lifetimes of obligation if they are not careful, which is pretty much how my group ended up joining the rebel alliance after being fairly aimless mercenaries for a year. 

Once you have players that have agency within your world, then you don't really have to plan out entire campaign arcs like within the books but rather just ask them "hey guys, I am going to ask you now just ahead of time; what do you guys want to do after this particular job wraps up? I mean I have a couple of ideas but I need to know ahead of time just so I can prepare something" I mean you don't need the entire table to collaborate in this manner as there are usually some "spectator players" who just enjoy taking things in. Usually there will be at least a couple of people who are super invested in the setting and may be able to offer you a couple of ideas and it's usually in your benefit to probe the ma a little bit as to what greater ambition this group of individuals has.

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Adjusting the difficulty of the game can be done on the fly and in many of the premade campaigns even give suggestions on making the checks harder. I'd also suggest you look through the player made campaigns as well, some really good encounters can be found in them.  Also setback dice, and  don't be afraid to use despairs on failed checks to destroy those "shiny" weapons and armor of theirs. 

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