Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Johnnygamealot

How do you know a Deck's Value?

Recommended Posts

I’d say it’s worth about $10. Others put them up for anywhere from$20-$300.

Play with it and enjoy the game. There’s no set medium for “pricing” these decks, so it’s determined by all kinds of different metrics made important by the individual trying to sell. You could price by horsemen, number of rares, “ADHD” ranking (weird system someone came up with for ranking a deck that everyone checks but no one actually uses), color of Archon. It’s all very subjective so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pay $10 for an unopened deck, and $15 for a deck I can see the decklist of.  Number of rares is really important to some people, but is very misleading in this game.  I look for maybe 2 cards (a simple combo or cards I want paired together) and see what decks offer them.  Then I peruse decks I can find with them to see if it would be fun to play.  It's pure speculation, though.  No way to know a specific decklist will work the way you expect without playing similar decks or similar card combos or just going over it and over it.

The Horsemen are really valuable to some (mostly those that are trying to sell them) but aren't a priori better.  According to people who've played them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now the best way to determine the market value of a deck is to search on eBay and look at SOLD auctions only (check the box on the left filter after doing your search). Asking price means nothing, but you can see what people have been willing to pay for a deck. In the first week or two after release, Horsemen decks were going for $150 - $250. Now they tend to go for $60-$100, depending on the quality of the other cards in the deck.

Other cards that fetch a premium include Timetraveller/Help from Future Self, Epic Quest, Faygin and Bear Flute (and plenty of others, but those are the some of the bigger ones that come to mind). And super-useful commons like Library Access and Bait and Switch also immediately raise the value of most decks, even if just by a few dollars. Certain house combinations are more desirable, like Dis/Logos/Shadows, while Brobnar and Mars get less love. But that doesn't mean those decks are any less powerful.

Of course if a deck has a game-breaking combo like Library Access + Nepenthe Seed/Reverse Time, it will add substantially to the deck's value.

And that worth is not determined by the seller... It's the buyers that say how much a deck is worth to them. If someone is willing to pay $250 for a deck because it has Timetraveller and Horsemen, then that deck is worth $250 to them.

If you're considering selling, decide what price would make you happier to sell than to keep, put it on eBay with that as the stating bid, and see what happens.

Edited by Jeff Hannes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Duciris said:

I pay $10 for an unopened deck, and $15 for a deck I can see the decklist of.  Number of rares is really important to some people, but is very misleading in this game.  I look for maybe 2 cards (a simple combo or cards I want paired together) and see what decks offer them.  Then I peruse decks I can find with them to see if it would be fun to play.  It's pure speculation, though.  No way to know a specific decklist will work the way you expect without playing similar decks or similar card combos or just going over it and over it.

The Horsemen are really valuable to some (mostly those that are trying to sell them) but aren't a priori better.  According to people who've played them.

Number of rares is so meaningless it isn't even funny. Sure, there are some very good ones, like Scout, but a lot of them are very situational. Furthermore most of the real power cards, like Bait and Switch or Library Access or even on a somewhat lower tier Anger, are commons. Evaluating a deck on anything but an individual level is bound to be pointless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Admiral Deathrain said:

Number of rares is so meaningless it isn't even funny. Sure, there are some very good ones, like Scout, but a lot of them are very situational. Furthermore most of the real power cards, like Bait and Switch or Library Access or even on a somewhat lower tier Anger, are commons. Evaluating a deck on anything but an individual level is bound to be pointless.

Number of rares might be meaningless to power, but it definitely isn't meaningless with regards to uniqueness (and therefore worth to some)... 

A deck with 7-9 rares will tend to have more variety than a deck with 2-3 rares. From a competitive standpoint that's generally a bad thing, since you want your deck to be consistent. But from a pure fun standpoint, I personally enjoy decks that have a different feel from game to game.

For someone who would like to be able to play with as many different cards as possible without owning a stupid number of decks, there can be great appeal to decks with a higher rare count, so I think it's perfectly reasonable for a deck with more rares to be worth a little more to a not insignificant subset of players.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mean, the value has to do with why the person is buying the deck.  Most people are operating under the assumption that a decks viability in play is the primary driver of value.  But there are plenty of other elements including rarity, aesthetic preferences (like cool Archon name for example) that might affect the value.

Personally, I find few things more bewildering than valuation of “collector’s items.”  I’d rather just play the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Derrault said:

Three cheers for a brief lesson in Microeconomics!

I am not wrong 😜

 

This is an open market with no hard set rules for what things cost. 

 

Magic is the same way but it plateaus based on use and desire, here it's all desire because it's a full deck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For Magic, there is a collectability or "build"-ability element as well - a playset of this particular set or the ability to make any mono-color deck from a cycle.  This has even fewer traditional collectability facets.

I'm not sure that I would classify it so much as microeconomics as it is a derivatives market.  Again, without the gotta-catch-'em-all capacity, it is truly derived by perceived value.  Which is utterly subjective and can only be measured through play, mock play, or imagined play.  Fascinating.

With promo items - like the hardcover rules for Arkham Horror 3e - you can search for sold copies to ascribe a relative value.  But these are indeed unique...sort of.  Similarity is best, but must be scoured to find.

Also, if I have a particular ideal set of cards in a deck, will I still find that Maltese Falcon as valuable in 3 months?  Will someone else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Duciris said:

For Magic, there is a collectability or "build"-ability element as well - a playset of this particular set or the ability to make any mono-color deck from a cycle.  This has even fewer traditional collectability facets.

I'm not sure that I would classify it so much as microeconomics as it is a derivatives market.  Again, without the gotta-catch-'em-all capacity, it is truly derived by perceived value.  Which is utterly subjective and can only be measured through play, mock play, or imagined play.  Fascinating.

With promo items - like the hardcover rules for Arkham Horror 3e - you can search for sold copies to ascribe a relative value.  But these are indeed unique...sort of.  Similarity is best, but must be scoured to find.

Also, if I have a particular ideal set of cards in a deck, will I still find that Maltese Falcon as valuable in 3 months?  Will someone else?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microeconomics

Particularly:

Elasticity is the measurement of how responsive an economic variable is to a change in another variable. Elasticity can be quantified as the ratio of the changein one variable to the change in another variable, when the later variable has a causal influence on the former. It is a tool for measuring the responsiveness of a variable, or of the function that determines it, to changes in causative variables in unitless ways. Frequently used elasticities include price elasticity of demandprice elasticity of supplyincome elasticity of demand, elasticity of substitution or constant elasticity of substitution between factors of production and elasticity of intertemporal substitution.

Consumer demand theoryEdit

 

Consumer demand theory relates preferences for the consumption of both goods and services to the consumption expenditures; ultimately, this relationship between preferences and consumption expenditures is used to relate preferences to consumer demand curves. The link between personal preferences, consumption and the demand curve is one of the most closely studied relations in economics. It is a way of analyzing how consumers may achieve equilibrium between preferences and expenditures by maximizing utility subject to consumer budget constraints.

Theory of productionEdit
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/14/2018 at 5:29 PM, Jeff Hannes said:

Number of rares might be meaningless to power, but it definitely isn't meaningless with regards to uniqueness (and therefore worth to some)... 

A deck with 7-9 rares will tend to have more variety than a deck with 2-3 rares. From a competitive standpoint that's generally a bad thing, since you want your deck to be consistent. But from a pure fun standpoint, I personally enjoy decks that have a different feel from game to game.

For someone who would like to be able to play with as many different cards as possible without owning a stupid number of decks, there can be great appeal to decks with a higher rare count, so I think it's perfectly reasonable for a deck with more rares to be worth a little more to a not insignificant subset of players.

My worse deck have 6 rares and best deck has 2 rares. There are a lot of good commons and it's a lot easier to get multiples of commons. Most of the rares in my "bad" deck is even quite good except Qyxxlyx Plague Master that does damages to humans (ignoring armor) and the deck has a lot of humans. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...