Jump to content
skotothalamos

How to pronounce "Gila"

Recommended Posts

Dont think ive ever heard the gi in gila pronounced without a hard G.

Even the animal gila monster, never heard it pronounced "hee-la" - ever. Its always "Ghee-la"

"Kim-ogg-you-la" ... wat? never heard that one lol

Edited by Vineheart01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, skotothalamos said:

Then you are definitely not from Gila County Arizona, nor have you encountered a Gila Monster, or been to the Gila River. 

It's an actual word. It's a Spanish transliteration of a Yuma Indian word that means "salty." Being Spanish, they wrote the "Hee" sound as "Gi."

And the Star Wars giant lizard that the ship is named for is based on the Gila Monster.

And it is a fictional universe with no Spaniards in it, so there is no need to bring them up in here. The rules of Spanish grammar bear little relevance in a galaxy far far away

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, RufusDaMan said:

And it is a fictional universe with no Spaniards in it, so there is no need to bring them up in here. The rules of Spanish grammar bear little relevance in a galaxy far far away

Nor does the English language, and yet they all speak it. What an amazing coincidence!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Vineheart01 said:

Dont think ive ever heard the gi in gila pronounced without a hard G.

Even the animal gila monster, never heard it pronounced "hee-la" - ever. Its always "Ghee-la"

"Kim-ogg-you-la" ... wat? never heard that one lol

guess you didn't watch any streams over the weekend. oh my god, it's awful.

Oh well. Try and educate people and they just say "but everyone else is dumb, too"

This whole thread just goes to show that you can't teach a nerd anything. He's already 110% sure he's right, even though his only source is his own head.

 

Edited by skotothalamos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, RufusDaMan said:

And it is a fictional universe with no Spaniards in it, so there is no need to bring them up in here. The rules of Spanish grammar bear little relevance in a galaxy far far away

... But the rules of English grammar do?  And, somehow, Imperial squadrons use Greek-letter designations?

When an educated person is faced with a weird spelling, without recourse to any reference authority, the educated person tries to use context to figure out the pronunciation.  The fictional nature of the world or universe with the weird spelling -- again, in the absence of a definitive answer -- is irrelevant to how an educated person should approach this.

Therefore, because "gila" is a real word -- and not just Spanish -- and because the relationship between kimogila and gila seems pretty obvious -- big nasty lizards -- then "hee-la" is more likely to be correct.

Because strings of harsh consonants in English tend to drag together gutterally, "Kihraxz" is, more likely than not, pronounced "Kih-rAHZH."

Because "scy" sounds without a trailing silent "E" is usually a short vowel sound (e.g., Scylla), rather than a long vowel sound or -- bizarrely -- a long EE sound, Scyk is, more likely than not, pronounced simply "sick."

And so on.  The point is, in the absence of other tools, it's actually a good thing to use existing language rules to puzzle out pronunciation, instead of simply making it up.

And, BTW, can all of you stop @#$% saying "Ah-SHO-ka" and "Om-NEE-cron?  There's no "sh" in the second syllable of Ahsoka, fer Christ's sake, and nor is there an "N" in the second syllable of "Omicron."  Just read the @#$% card!

...

Triggered.

Edited by Jeff Wilder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been just saying "the Kimo"

15 minutes ago, skotothalamos said:

Oh well. Try and educate people and they just say "but everyone else is dumb, too"

Don't sweat it.

I know I'm not going to correct anyone for saying it their own way--because its Star Wars after all. Nothing that needs to be taken too seriously.

Besides, there are examples of names & words that have different pronunciations in the films: Leia & Hoth immediately come to mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Darth Meanie said:

So, is that the "Em Twelve" or the "Em One Two"?

If you get it wrong, somebody's gonna get stabbed in the eye.  Or is that a Focus token?

Depends on if you're English or American. American it would be em twelve. English is em one two.

Edited by Stoneface
Auto correct

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, skotothalamos said:

guess you didn't watch any streams over the weekend. oh my god, it's awful.

Oh well. Try and educate people and they just say "but everyone else is dumb, too"

This whole thread just goes to show that you can't teach a nerd anything. He's already 110% sure he's right, even though his only source is his own head.

 

That's a little harsh. Mostly because it's so close to the truth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jeff Wilder said:

... But the rules of English grammar do?  And, somehow, Imperial squadrons use Greek-letter designations?

When an educated person is faced with a weird spelling, without recourse to any reference authority, the educated person tries to use context to figure out the pronunciation.  The fictional nature of the world or universe with the weird spelling -- again, in the absence of a definitive answer -- is irrelevant to how an educated person should approach this.

Therefore, because "gila" is a real word -- and not just Spanish -- and because the relationship between kimogila and gila seems pretty obvious -- big nasty lizards -- then "hee-la" is more likely to be correct.

Because strings of harsh consonants in English tend to drag together gutterally, "Kihraxz" is, more likely than not, pronounced "Kih-rAHZH."

Because "scy" sounds without a trailing silent "E" is usually a short vowel sound (e.g., Scylla), rather than a long vowel sound or -- bizarrely -- a long EE sound, Scyk is, more likely than not, pronounced simply "sick."

And so on.  The point is, in the absence of other tools, it's actually a good thing to use existing language rules to puzzle out punctuation, instead of simply making it up.

And, BTW, can all of you stop @#$% saying "Ah-SHO-ka" and "Om-NEE-cron?  There's no "sh" in the second syllable of Ahsoka, fer Christ's sake, and nor is there an "N" in the second syllable of "Omicron."  Just read the @#$% card!

...

Triggered.

If anyone remembers Hooked on Phonex then the following will make sense.

A second grade class was quietly reading when one boy pointed at a picture and said, "A friccan elephant". The teacher, somewhat horrified went to see what was up. The young boy was pointing to a picture with the caption "African Elephant".

That ends the lesson for the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jeff Wilder said:

... But the rules of English grammar do?  And, somehow, Imperial squadrons use Greek-letter designations?

When an educated person is faced with a weird spelling, without recourse to any reference authority, the educated person tries to use context to figure out the pronunciation.  The fictional nature of the world or universe with the weird spelling -- again, in the absence of a definitive answer -- is irrelevant to how an educated person should approach this.

Therefore, because "gila" is a real word -- and not just Spanish -- and because the relationship between kimogila and gila seems pretty obvious -- big nasty lizards -- then "hee-la" is more likely to be correct.

Because strings of harsh consonants in English tend to drag together gutterally, "Kihraxz" is, more likely than not, pronounced "Kih-rAHZH."

Because "scy" sounds without a trailing silent "E" is usually a short vowel sound (e.g., Scylla), rather than a long vowel sound or -- bizarrely -- a long EE sound, Scyk is, more likely than not, pronounced simply "sick."

And so on.  The point is, in the absence of other tools, it's actually a good thing to use existing language rules to puzzle out punctuation, instead of simply making it up.

And, BTW, can all of you stop @#$% saying "Ah-SHO-ka" and "Om-NEE-cron?  There's no "sh" in the second syllable of Ahsoka, fer Christ's sake, and nor is there an "N" in the second syllable of "Omicron."  Just read the @#$% card!

...

Triggered.

^This + a dash of Occam's Razor always helps with SW related names.

Lucas didn't pluck this stuff out of thin air, its all based on something from our world. Whether its Vader's suit being based on Samurai armour, or Tatooine being a real place (Tataouine, Tunisia) it all came from real life in some way.

If there is a real lizard called a Gila Monster, and the fictional ship is named after a fictional lizard that closely resembles the real lizard, its very safe to assume that it would be pronounced the same way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, skotothalamos said:

Then you are definitely not from Gila County Arizona, nor have you encountered a Gila Monster, or been to the Gila River. 

It's an actual word. It's a Spanish transliteration of a Yuma Indian word that means "salty." Being Spanish, they wrote the "Hee" sound as "Gi."

And the Star Wars giant lizard that the ship is named for is based on the Gila Monster.

Gila is malay for crazy. It's pronounced with a hard G, like Ali G.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...