Jump to content
Synge

My review of Genesys rpg

Recommended Posts

I'll take a look soon!

I did see one review where the reviewer called the art style "unacceptable". I didn't realise art was objective, but to this guy it was a huge stumbling block. I stopped watching at this point, hopefully without being enough to have monetised the video.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Lordmhoram said:

Yeah if you dont have the dice from SW then yeah the Genesys dice are for you! I did buy a set just to have them...

 

Fairly nice review thank you.

Every review I've read or seen talks about the dice and saying "just use star wars dice". I think the dice are for people like me - interested in the system, fans of universal games, but never played star wars, so I have no dice of this sort.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Krysmo said:

How is this better and more adaptable than GURPS? Or is it?

First off HUGE GURPs fan...but....Genesys is a little easier to get up and going and I think the learning curve is allot lighter for a new player than GURPs...Course that being said I have not seen the new fantasy GURPs as I have heard its much friendlier to new players.

GURPs is allot of work for the GM and the player with having stat out the NPC's and mooks....Genesysis very LIGHT in that department and its pretty easy to fudge a npc if he is not going to be showing up allot. Course you can do that in GURPs too. So I guess its just up to you to try it out (Genesys) and see if its to your style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Synge said:

Yeah if you dont have the dice from SW then yeah the Genesys dice are for you! I did buy a set just to have them...

:)

I think I am in the vast minority that I am not coming to this from Star Wars. That sort of colors my view of comments and reviews. I see "this doesn't have talent trees like star wars, it has a talent pyramid" - and half of that comment is useless to me, as I have no clue what a talent tree in SW is. lots of stuff like that. I have yet to see a single review that just comments on the game as it's own game, but rather as Star Wars little Brother. (I'm not calling you out, your review was great) - just that everyone takes that approach.

When I'm read the book solidly, I plan to post a review - but not mention star wars really, but come to it as a fan of universal / generic systems and how it works in that POV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Lordmhoram said:

:)

I think I am in the vast minority that I am not coming to this from Star Wars. That sort of colors my view of comments and reviews. I see "this doesn't have talent trees like star wars, it has a talent pyramid" - and half of that comment is useless to me, as I have no clue what a talent tree in SW is. lots of stuff like that. I have yet to see a single review that just comments on the game as it's own game, but rather as Star Wars little Brother. (I'm not calling you out, your review was great) - just that everyone takes that approach.

When I'm read the book solidly, I plan to post a review - but not mention star wars really, but come to it as a fan of universal / generic systems and how it works in that POV.

I look forward to that review...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, gilbur said:

AS experience in Gurps, creating characters is way faster then Gurps and the system is more open then Gurps.

I play GURPS fast and light anyway, but if I want a rule it's there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great review by the way, even though I did not have to watch your review as I was drawn to the book once it was announced. Your review is 5 times better than the idiot on "Live from the Sword Coast". He did not do his research which he had plenty of time to do and do his comparing of GENESYS to the Star Wars system and would have seen that they were the same systems for the Dice and would have at least saved 30 dollars, but do understand wanting to be complete just like your review.

  Everyone needs to understand that this is not a complete game system but a TOOL KIT to use the Narrative Dice System for any Setting from Dungeons and Dragons to Star Wars, So everything in between these two settings you only need this book to help guide you in the direction of your favorite Setting using the Narrative dice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2017 at 5:58 PM, Krysmo said:

How is this better and more adaptable than GURPS? Or is it?

 The NDS manages to fix the real issue you have with numerical dice systems, which is getting the numbers to mean something. See, my real issue with GURPS is that every ability tends to boil down to a +X/-X bonus on your 3d6 roll. They've gone a long way in making all that mean a bunch of different things, but at the end of the day you're still working with this linear scale of numbers, and boiling all these circumstances and penalties as numerical values on that scale. For GURPS this is quite crunchy, whereas in systems like 5e, it's almost too vague with Advantage/Disadvantage, etc.

The NDS fixes that by NOT being a linear scale system, but an XY axis scale system thanks to the addition of Threat/Advantage, which means mechanical effects can work through either or both, and have a greater meaning. Take, for example, the Automatic trait of firearms. In most systems, they just up the damage, but in Star Wars they allow you to spend Advantages to get extra hits in. There's some actual meaning behind it, not just more damage.

There's also that Circumstancial bonuses and penalties are separate dice from the core skill roll.

All in all, this lends itself to be far more adaptable to any setting for sheer diversity of mechanics. At least, that's my take on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2017 at 4:58 PM, Krysmo said:

How is this better and more adaptable than GURPS? Or is it?

It isn't.  But, while they are both generic roleplaying games, that is really were the similarity ends. Both have completely different dice mechanics, character options and builds, etc., etc. One is NOT a substitute for the other as they both lead to very different gaming experiences. The dice mechanics for GURPS is more on a continuum of No, and... No,... Yes,... Yes, and. While the GENESYS dice mechanic is along the lines of No, and... No, but..., No..., Yes..., Yes, but..., Yes, and. However the sheer plethora of detail that can be ground out with GURPS is staggeringly awesome, which I think would be painful to do in GENESYS until there are more source/world books out in the wild.

I like GURPS and would never think of replacing it with GENESYS; I like GENESYS, but would never contemplate replacing it with GURPS.

So, it's not a case so much of which system is better and more adaptable, so much as what flavor of experience am I looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2017 at 4:58 PM, Krysmo said:

How is this better and more adaptable than GURPS? Or is it?

The other thing to keep in mind that GURPS is on its FOURTH edition. When it first came, as a boxed set, it was even more limited then Genesys is. Genesys includes a basic magic system and sample settings where GURPS 1st actually told the reader to wait for future publications for how do anything was wasn't solely skill usage. 

@Artwend is correct. Genesys is about moving the story forward with interesting twists and turns where with most games, its strictly succeed or don't. Ultimately, I think Genesys will become more like GURPS with sourcebooks that fully flesh out the mechanics but they will do it without the heavy reliance on absolute numbers that GURPS and other games are so burdened hang tight to.

As far as overall adaptability goes, GURPS pails when compared to HERO. While GURPS does offer a fairly granular power and spell creation system, it still spreads out too many mechanics over too many books and you are highly disadvantaged if you only have the core rule book. 95% of all mechanics and abilities are extremely well defined in the corebook and the Hero support books are just different ways to use the rules from the main book. They also took 4 editions to get to this point. Hero has a bit of math if you let it, but its minor especially compared to its flexibility.

GURPS, HERO, and most games are very binary in their approaches to success failure as they are simulationist games. The narrative approach of NDS makes the absoluteness of inflexible mechanics a burden that actually gets in the way of being adaptable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/6/2018 at 4:06 AM, StanTheMan said:

Just wanted to say your review convinced me to give the game a go. I ordered it yesterday and am now awaiting my copy to arrive (next week with luck). So, thanks for that!

That is AWESOME StantheMan! Thanks for the kind words....I truly hope you enjoy the game....I getting ready to run a fantasy setting myself using this system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just want to say that I called it in my review (which was one of the first ones out in the youtube wilds!) that Realms of Terrinoth would be the first setting that FFG releases. And the next one will be set in the Twilight Imperium universe I think! 

 

Thanks to all the peoples for watching my review...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Synge said:

That is AWESOME StantheMan! Thanks for the kind words....I truly hope you enjoy the game....I getting ready to run a fantasy setting myself using this system.

Well, I've the book now since last Friday and it's simply amazing. I've had a million and one ideas for it. As I've commented elsewhere, on another forum, it's weird by Genesys has sparked some creativity in me, in that I don't feel terribly constrained about what I can do with the game. I've already homebrewed a not!Shadowrun game for it (based on the game I'm running now in Fate Core) and worked up things for a Roman Republic game I've had in mind forever. I'm now thinking to work on a Honor Harrington-esque game (though with the SW books for ships stats that's a bit too easy). So, really, a very happy gamer with my purchase! One of the best books I've bought in a long time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember also RPG's by their nature are more customisable than other games- you can tweak things a bit more so if a particular dynamic of how the game functions isn't quite right for you and your players you can tweak it to suit- I played one RPG session where the person running it was using one system but used a balancer feature he liked from another system and the two together worked really well for that particular RPG session, and the game had a really nice shifting dynamic of things going really well or quite badly for us- as long as the players know how things work you can make the system your own as well as the story you're telling. Often the latter may inform the former, the story can influence how it is best played out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 07/01/2018 at 4:40 AM, lyinggod said:

GURPS, HERO, and most games are very binary in their approaches to success failure as they are simulationist games. The narrative approach of NDS makes the absoluteness of inflexible mechanics a burden that actually gets in the way of being adaptable.

I have to be honest, having used this system for a variety of different games (even before Genesys was released), I don't agree that it is any more inflexible than any system. As Gilbur said above, this is a Toolkit not a complete system so you can use this to make the setting you want, especially since the talents are now based on a tier system rather than a preset tree per career specialisation. 

That said everyone sees things differently, and I do agree with you on GURPS etc. I am not sure most games are simulationist (which I hate tbh) but some are. Given the narrative approach you are limited only really by your imagination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, eldath said:

I have to be honest, having used this system for a variety of different games (even before Genesys was released), I don't agree that it is any more inflexible than any system.

I wasn't saying that Genesys (NDS) wasn't inflexible. I was saying that most games are inherently inflexible in their approach to outcome resolution and their system mechanics. When I first was introduced to Star Wars, after playing a variety of simulationist and narrative games for many years, I recognized what the Advantage/Threat mechanic was meant to be. It was FFG's attempt to encourage simulationist game players (d20 and the most other games) to  think far outside the box, which is to say play narratively and not in the typical binary manner. I wasn't aware, at the time, that Star Wars's NDS was an evolution of FFG's WHFRP 3rd edition.

1 hour ago, eldath said:

this is a Toolkit not a complete system so you can use this to make the setting you want,

Yes, I realized that this is a tool kit, as are Gurps, Hero, Fate, Fudge, Otherworlds, and Cypher, to name a few. They are designed to be pick and choose type systems. This concept is what makes them so great. The problem is that the core Hero 1st+ (aka Champions 4th) edition and Gurps 3rd Edition+ (to a lesser degree) books are complete games. This is not from a world perspective (ie Forgotten Realms) but mechanically. The ability to create, design, and do just about everything is completely covered. Genesys is more akin to Fate, Otherworlds, Fudge, and Cypher. Your given basic examples of a few things and then told to essentially "wing it". On the plus side, when GURPS 1st edition came out, it was less defined then even Genesys.

Don't get me wrong, I like Genesys a lot but it seems to me that a lot of was purposefully left out to be placed in upcoming source books. Example: Persistent non-spell abilities such as superpowers ,cybernetics, crafting in any form, and personal flight, are a examples of some of the things that immediately come to mind. 

1 hour ago, eldath said:

I am not sure most games are simulationist (which I hate tbh) but some are. Given the narrative approach you are limited only really by your imagination.

I have had a chance to look at LOT of roleplaying games and many are designed to be simulationist. Success and failure is absolute. They also have an extremely detailed economy regarding character sheets and tracking Hit Points, Ammo, Spells used per day, and a variety of other items. The World of Darkness was one first games designed to be narrative but was dismissed by many because it wasn't about the dungeon crawl and killing for XP. Slowly more games have come out that more narrative to various degrees (Fate, Otherworlds, Cypher, Fudge)  but these still in the minority but the minority is growing.

Limited by imagination: I agree and I have always included numerous narrative aspects in all games I have run. My group has (unfortunately) elected to play Pathfinder Mathfinder. The same GM also runs Star Wars and is pretty good at it. However He is a long time D20 player and I am trying to get him to treat 1s and 20s  as being more then simple fail or pass, but his response is "it's not in the rules". Too many GM's lack imagination and can't escape the ridged mind set of "Rules as Written".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...