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Concise Locket

Prepping the Next Campaign: A Quasi-Hexcrawl Approach

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On 10/12/2017 at 3:13 PM, Kota624 said:

That makes total sense. I have this habit of wanting to over prep. I get into this rut of wanting to get stuff down but knowing that my players' decisions will supersede anything I prep anyway. We are at the beginning of this hexcrawl type game too so I've been jotting down ideas and feeding them rumors that I've been prepping as we go

Suggestion: If you're the person who *likes* prepping or writing, don't throw anything away. Just because your players don't happen upon that intricately planned encounter doesn't mean you can't use it down the road. They'll never know.

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CL-- Do you have any maps or pictures for your sector, or the planets?

 

I've shamelessly stolen your PDF document of the various planets, and while I've removed the NPCs, I find myself struggling to draw a space map of the cluster.

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On 10/20/2017 at 1:27 PM, P-Dub663 said:

CL-- Do you have any maps or pictures for your sector, or the planets?

 

I've shamelessly stolen your PDF document of the various planets, and while I've removed the NPCs, I find myself struggling to draw a space map of the cluster.

Here you go.

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Eagerly awaiting your next update about the game and how it is running! Planning my own type of campaign based upon this style of prep-work and seriously enjoying it! 

Looking forward to more awesome tips! 

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The campaign is going well. I don't like sharing boring gaming stories so I'll try to keep this condensed.

The Story Thus Far: When the game started, the PCs were survivors of a Rebel cell that was destroyed by overwhelming Imperial forces during a starfighter raid. This explained why they had Y-Wings, the clothes on their backs, and not much else. They stumbled into helping out a wounded Sullustan smuggler which led them to a septuagenarian general from the Clone Wars. While the general wasn't engaged in active resistance he plugged the PCs in with the greater Rebel Alliance. After a treasure hunt, the PCs discovered an unoccupied hidden base from which to rebuild.

While the players are always welcome to recruit NPCs into the cause, I give them overt motivations to recruit fighters and support personnel or acquire ships, like a pair of prototype E-wings, by having that be the focus of a mission. On an early mission, the PCs came into contact with a local intelligence network run by a vending machine magnate and planted a temporary bug in the Imperial Intelligence sector plexus. This gave them more leads to follow. 

On another mission, they recruited a large group of rag-tag anti-Imperial mercenaries who now serve as the various miscellaneous mechanics and fighting men for their cell.

They did fall into an ISB sweep when a lead led to an agent who was posing as a defector. This resulted in the intelligence network above being broken and forced the players to rescue its leadership. 

As the game goes on and the players Contribution rank increases, their base gets bigger and more sophisticated. The Rebel Alliance, which is beginning to trust them more, sends them ships and equipment. The players asked for a Consular-class cruiser, which they will probably build a fleet around. 

On a sad note, two player characters were killed on one mission. Both characters were our table's Ace-career focused characters and they died in a shootout on the ground. As a GM, I didn't feel particularly great about that because my extremely lucky rolls were bad news for the PCs. Untreated critical injuries add up and anyone who thinks that minions are weak and useless are completely wrong.

Areas for Improvement: I would like to see more opportunities for squad and mass combat. Mass combat is a nice sub-system that allows players to visualize the cinematic scope of, say, storming an Imperial fortification without relying on dungeon-crawl style combat encounters after combat encounters. 

Our Diplomat character has had quite a bit to do. We've had success with using the social combat rules. But I'd still like to figure out a way to introduce more dramatic diplomacy into the game.

One of the Ace career players opted to create a Soldier - Medic as a replacement character. That's going to put a crimp on the snubfighter combat aspect of the game. That may need to be relegated to squadron or even mass combat die rolls rather than ship-on-ship combat.

Edited by Concise Locket

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The player running the other deceased Ace character came back with a Commander - Drill Instructor PC. She likes that her character can use Body Guard talents and take hits meant for other people and has useful social talents.

Though the Diplomat has also taken Commander - Squadron Leader as a second specialization, the group is now effectively ground-based which means I'll need to tweak the campaign's focus. This, kids, is why you don't write out an entire campaign from beginning to end! :)

Edited by Concise Locket
Typo

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After totaling the player's Duty scores with Saturday's game, they hit Contribution Level 5. They are officially half-way through the campaign which means now is a good time to evaluate the game as a whole.

Successes: When we don't have all 5 players, one player often real-time texts the major blow-by-blows to those that are missing. I've also received unsolicited verbal praise so the game is healthy and the players are invested.

The player characters now have a fully staffed operational base. I used the Defiant Core from Strongholds of Resistance so they now have support staff, troops, and pilots at their disposal including a Y-Wing squadron, a Z-95 Headhunter squadron, and a mixed squadron of A-wings, X-wings, and E-wings. They also have a small, reasonably Rebel-esque fleet consisting of a light cruiser, some light freighters and transports and, yes, a Hutt's former space yacht. I think this would be overkill if the campaign was focused on a single sector, but the Tion Cluster is five sectors, each with their own Imperial fleets plus the addition of Grand Moff Kaine and Scourge Squadron (basically the Darth Vader-type boss for the campaign). They can run reasonably effective operations but they're very outgunned and very outnumbered.

Their cell has gotten big enough to start using the Mass Combat rules and they like them, especially the narrative nature. They also like engaging in smaller tasks that give Boost dice to Mass Combat checks. Succeeding on those tasks doesn't guarantee the Mass Combat check is going to work in their favor, but it gives the players the sense that they're contributing to the greater narrative.

Now that they've got a fighting force of 200, including pilots, we can do more squad combat, which is something we've only done once.

Observation 1: The Contribution Level is a nice mechanic that gives players access to equipment that drives the story - specifically ships - but it shouldn't be the only way the players get big-ticket items. The Hutt yacht and some of the transports were acquired through a convoluted heist that involved convincing an organized crime lord to set up a meet with another crime lord, convincing the second crime lord that he should provide fake bounty hunting licenses if they capture a third crime lord on his behalf, faking their way aboard an Imperial Customs station, sneaking around and disabling the station, and getting away before the in-system Imperials captured them.

Suffice to say, if you have a good plot idea for acquiring big-ticket items, do it. However, repeatedly stealing stuff gets old so the Contribution mechanic fills in the gaps. 

Don't be afraid to say "no" if it becomes obvious that the players are flippant with the rules. A dreadnought might technically be available at Contribution Level 3 but if the PCs don't have the staff to run it, it's okay to decline that request. Offer a reasonable alternative. 

Another nice thing about the Contribution mechanic is that, eventually, each player is going to have the equipment that (s)he wants for his/her character. They start to focus less on acquiring gear/pilfering bodies, and focus more on the bigger story.

Observation 2: Duty focuses the plots in the campaign. Our PCs duties revolve around agitating for support, counter-intelligence, and combat victories so the plots generally focus on some variant of convincing a local government to support the Rebellion in exchange for something, hunting spies, and shooting Imperials. If a player wanted to focus on, say, building ships, that could be easily accommodated but it would definitely change the tone of the game from action and politics to more of a quartermaster focus.

Observation 3: Giving players choices doesn't mean giving them infinite choices. Nor do they actually want infinite choice. I'm fairly notes heavy but I'm only a few steps ahead of my players. While I have a very general feel for how the campaign should end, I haven't committed any thoughts to what that will look like. At the beginning of the campaign, the Tion Cluster was theirs to explore but as we've moved along, the choices the PCs have made both in terms of actions in the game and what their characters' careers are, has really moved the game down a singular path.

Giving a group of players two choices is still giving them a choice. I think 3 - 4 would be ideal. Any more than that is ridiculous and unmanageable. I may write about this concept in a future forum post.

Observation 4: When handling diplomatic negotiations, you only need a few lines of notes for an opponent NPC. You can expand a diplomatic story by having the PCs acquire something that the NPC wants, simply run it as social combat with whoever drains the other's Strain Threshold first winning, or a one-off Negotiation test.

Struggle 1: Writing plots for war campaigns is hard. AoR provides careers for diplomacy or engineering-minded characters but, at the end of the day, if a GM isn't providing set-piece combat engagements, he's not really running a war-focused Star Wars campaign. And because FFG's narrative system makes it easy to run and quickly resolve large-scale combat, if you're only focusing on sneaky spy stuff, you're not taking advantage of the system.

That said, coming up with unique environments, especially space environments, that will challenge players and provide for an adequate story twist is tough.

Struggle 2: Infiltration plots become very repetitive after awhile. While sneaking in-and-out is a key theme in cyberpunk heist games like Shadowrun, Shadowrun offered a variety of targets. Edge of the Empire, which is basically Shadowrun in the Star Wars Universe, is pretty versatile in this regard as well. In AoR, you're only going up against one target; the Empire. It's a struggle to come up with unique twists on the boxy, gun-metal gray labyrinth. 

Struggle 3: Players never do the research, even when researching a topic will help them with bonus dice on some future roll, unless I prompt them. "I go there," is the most common response to the reveal of a new node in the plot. I think every GM wants their players to take the bull by the horns and it's kind of a bummer when players are reactionary, not proactive.

Struggle 4: Players don't seem to invest as much in their characters as GMs do in the setting. We're halfway through the game and I don't know any more about their characters as when we started and when when we started their characters were a species, a career specialization, a motivation, and a duty. I don't want pages of backstory but I'd like something to hang a plot point or two on.

Conclusion: I started a second RPG group. When I started this AoR campaign, I told myself it would be the last Star Wars game I run for awhile. However, having run this campaign I'm inspired to take what I've learned and apply it to an Edge of the Empire game. I like the idea of a Hutt Space game with one of the players taking the role of a young Hutt looking to build a new kajidic. "Somebody's got to have it, why not us?" is the perfect campaign theme.

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Morning Mr Locket (well it’s morning here in the uk anyway), would u mind if I pm’d you for some advice? I’m running a campaign in a similar vein to yours & we’ve just completed the introductory part! So seeing as it’s now going full on rebellion I wouldn’t mind your opinion on a few areas I’m struggling to develop!

Cheers :)

Edited by AceSolo5
Dodgy spelling

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7 hours ago, AceSolo5 said:

Morning Mr Locket (well it’s morning here in the uk anyway), would u mind if I pm’d you for some advice? I’m running a campaign in a similar vein to yours & we’ve just completed the introductory part! So seeing as it’s now going full on rebellion I wouldn’t mind your opinion on a few areas I’m struggling to develop!

Cheers :)

Sure. I'll try and answer questions as quickly as I can.

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My new game group has expressed an interest in a FFG SW game. With the exception of my wife and myself, no one at the table has played the game though most of the players have the Edge of the Empire core book. We're starting a short The Dracula Dossier campaign which gives me time to prepare a formal campaign pitch. But I don't have time to dilly-dally. I did run the idea of "you are an up-and-coming Hutt syndicate" past one player who found the idea amusing.

My mind is currently split into two approaches:

APPROACH 1
If I want to model this EotE game after my AoR campaign, I have two location options: the Corellian Sector and Hutt Space.

Could I build a region of space from scratch like I did for my version of the Tion Cluster? Probably. Do I want to? Eh... not really. The AoR approach was exhausting, especially in terms of finding inspiration for planetary write-ups and planetary leaders. Granted, in an EotE campaign, players aren't trying to flip entire worlds to a political cause so that level of detail probably wouldn't be necessary. But the amount of creative balancing I feel like I need to do to create a well-rounded cluster of systems can be tiring. When I was writing up the Tion Cluster, my brain went into full obsessive-compulsive mode: "Okay, I already have two desert planets, two ice planets, two city planets, and two forest planets. Do I add a lava planet or a jungle planet? Will a jungle planet play like a forest planet...?" I'm my own worst critic and using pre-generated settings alleviates my game design anxiety.

Setting-wise, the Corellian Sector and Hutt Space both have their pros and cons.

The Corellian Sector
Pros: 1) presented planetary environments are diverse, 2) Core region means possible Imperial entanglements, 3) CorSec is a good foil, 4) Corellia's age lends itself to pre-Republic archaeological mysteries, 5) the proto-typical smuggler campaign setting
Cons: 1) other than the Duros, no other iconic non-Humans make their home there, 2) the region has been well-charted and long-settled, 3) lacking in non-Human weirdness

Hutt Space
Pros: 1) heavily non-Human, 2) Nar Shaddaa is a super-cool location, 3) possibility of Hutt-on-Hutt shenanigans, 4) home worlds of iconic non-Human species, 5) weird places to explore
Cons: 1) presented planetary environments are limited to swamps, deserts, and Nar Shaddaa, 2) other than Saki, every planet is a Hutt client world which can get old, 3) getting non-Hutt crime cartels like Black Sun or the Zann Consortium involved would break the idea of total Hutt dominance

If I go with Approach 1, I'm leaning toward the Corellian Sector. If the players like the Hutt syndicate idea, we can always spin it that their patrons want to set up new operations in the Corellian Sector. However, I'm willing to entertain the idea that Hutt Space would work better.

APPROACH 2
Kid, I've flown from one side of the galaxy to the other. I've seen a lot of strange stuff...

Ditching the regional focus and expanding adventures to every planet in the galaxy is an option. Bopping around Coruscant for one story arc and then Tatooine for another could work. As a positive, this approach would allow for the players to visit multiple planets, both iconic and Expanded Universe-related.

As a negative, without a galactic neighborhood to anchor the campaign, it limits adventure arcs to: infochant has a job, go to the place where the job is, get paid. There isn't a strong thematic element, just a Shadowrun-esque series of mercenary adventures. I was able to make this approach work two campaigns ago as we had a blended EotE and Force & Destiny campaign involving chasing artifacts. Unfortunately, with 8 movies and 2 TV shows focused on Those That Wield the Lightsaber, my taste for Jedi-related stories is non-existent at the moment.

I have some thinking to do.

 

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@Concise Locket   I fully understand picking through the endless possibilities to decide on a campaign setting and start point.  I'm currently in the process myself.  What I love about EotE is the wide open aspect of it.  Unlike the Rebellion or Force Users, criminal enterprise can be found anywhere.  While I don't have the Lords of Nal Hutta guide yet, I know it focuses on the Hutt Syndicates but there's nothing there that says Black Sun, Crimson Dawn, or some other criminal organization can't also operate in Hutt Space.  Tons of movies and TV shows have used criminal competition and gang wars as a plot device; it makes for a good story.  For instance, you could be hired by some group that's trying to muscle in on Hutt space to steal some of their business, which ups the ante of getting caught by the Hutts.  Or you could work for one syndicate trying to improve it's power base & wealth by stealing from or sabotaging the competition, something the Hutts are known to do.  You have the makings of your very own Godfather: SW style.  Not to mention, the Hutt's aren't just limited to their sector.  They reach throughout the Outer Rim and have business dealings with all types of people, even the Empire.  This opens up any number of new locations and environments.  Just some food for thought.

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I always go down the route of creating my own area of space for my players to adventure in! However I know exactly what your saying in that it’s a helluva lot of work & coming up with new & different ideas for worlds can be tough. I’m finding this especially now as the area for my current campaign is larger than I’d usually create but the star chart is drawn now & foolishly I let the players see it ?

For my last campaign I kept the area relatively small, whilst still giving room to manoeuvre. The campaign was based in a small star cluster in the Outer Rim which could only be reached via one hyperspace lane, which gave the area a fairly isolated feel.

The cluster had 2 criminal organisations (1 controlled by an exiled Hutt) who were in the midst of a shadow war, an urban world controlled by a number of corporations, a trade world with a thriving black market at the intersection of a number of hyper-lanes within the cluster & a world populated by an altruistic people (ripped off from Alderaan really). I felt that these gave me numerous opportunities for varied scenarios.

The campaign also had an over arching theme whereby The Empire wanted the resources of the Hutt controlled world (an extremely rare metal mined in the Mines of Tang Khoor that they required for some project that was being built at Geonosis). The players started by doing jobs for the corporations then became involved in the criminal shadow war on the side of the Hutt. Things changed however when The Empire blockaded the entire cluster sealing everybody in there & the campaign became a fight for survival, with factions choosing sides & either helping The Imperials or working to thwart them!

All in all there were probably 10 planets in the cluster, which was pretty easy to manage & to be honest... after 18 months of play the players still didn’t visit all of them!

We’re about 3 months into my current campaign & I still haven’t fleshed out all the planets in my sub-sector (which still bugs me ?). 

So what’s the moral of this post... “Good things can come in small packages” I suppose ?

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On 5/30/2018 at 2:36 PM, crashnburninc said:

@Concise Locket   I fully understand picking through the endless possibilities to decide on a campaign setting and start point.  I'm currently in the process myself.  What I love about EotE is the wide open aspect of it.  Unlike the Rebellion or Force Users, criminal enterprise can be found anywhere.  While I don't have the Lords of Nal Hutta guide yet, I know it focuses on the Hutt Syndicates but there's nothing there that says Black Sun, Crimson Dawn, or some other criminal organization can't also operate in Hutt Space.  Tons of movies and TV shows have used criminal competition and gang wars as a plot device; it makes for a good story.  For instance, you could be hired by some group that's trying to muscle in on Hutt space to steal some of their business, which ups the ante of getting caught by the Hutts.  Or you could work for one syndicate trying to improve it's power base & wealth by stealing from or sabotaging the competition, something the Hutts are known to do.  You have the makings of your very own Godfather: SW style.  Not to mention, the Hutt's aren't just limited to their sector.  They reach throughout the Outer Rim and have business dealings with all types of people, even the Empire.  This opens up any number of new locations and environments.  Just some food for thought.

I'm open to being incorrect but my understanding of Hutt Space is that, with 15,000 years of the "Somebody's got to have it, why not us?" Hutt philosophy, it's impenetrable to gangsters outside the kajidic system. Real-life Italy has non-Italian criminal organizations but they're all very small and operate with the permission of the mafias. Hutts view their race as god-like and their legal and illegal actions are just a matter of what's more convenient and profitable. I could see certain Hutts sub-contracting work to outside groups. For example, Durga the Hutt is also a member of Black Sun which gives him access to other resources. But, based on the text the game has provided, I struggle to see how a non-Hutt group in Hutt space could be a viable competing interest. I know, I know... I can change setting material to fit the needs of the game but I like to keep to a) canon and b) what the game presents in order to be consistent.

You are right though, the Hutts aren't just limited to their sector. They're all over the Outer Rim and in the Clone Wars they had operations on Coruscant. Part of me is drawn to the idea of a Hutt being frustrated with trying to break into the hyper-competitive, razor-thin margins of Hutt Space business enterprises and trying to set up shop in a Core Worlds sector. In his eyes, it could be easier to deal with greedy Imperials or corrupt CorSec agents than other Hutts. The Corellian Sector source book references a couple of organized crime groups that could be good foils including the Sacorrian Triad. 

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A campaign centered on a young Hutt trying to make a name for itself does sound fun. A ambitious Hutt struggling through the internal hyper competitiveness of the clan and hoping to gain influence within its Kajidic. Maybe start off the party just trying to maintain the present Kajidic's underworld influence, promote the Hutt to Lieutenant or 2nd in command to the Hutt's family clan leader, and then the party begins the acquisition stage while gaining respect from the Kajidic.

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After a lot of thinking on the subject, I've decided to set the campaign in Hutt Space. I need to run a Star Wars game that doesn't feel like my Age of Rebellion campaign and a region dominated by non-Humans fits the bill. 

For this game, I want to introduce some sort of faction tracking system as I'd like to see the characters navigating through competing interests and making choices with consequences. Five factions feels like a good number. Any more than that and it risks becoming unmanageable and any less than that and all the choices become either/or.

Two competing Hutt factions seems appropriate; one which is a Clan of the Ancients and one not. Black Sun, operating with Besadii blessings, works. I like the idea of the Zann Consortium getting aggressive and either directly moving into Hutt Space with force of arms or engaging in criminal cold war style antics. As a fifth faction, the Sakiyans might work: they're an independent and technologically advanced species that lives in the center of Hutt Space and have managed to avoid being subsumed for centuries.

My next step is create a map, like what I did for the Tion Cluster. The map in Lords of Nal Hutta is fine for what it is but I want a prop that acts as a table center piece and that players can look at during the game.

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Well, after I started prepping this campaign, I realized that the lack of environmental diversity in the presented Hutt Space materials was going to put a damper on my plans. I'm keeping the Five (now Six) Faction Tracking System but I'm moving the campaign to the Corellian Sector and changing the groups up. They will be:

  1. Black Sun
  2. Baron Benton Kaldo's crime family
  3. The Gorensla kajidic
  4. The Zann Consortium 
  5. The Corellian Diktat
  6. The Sacorrian Triad

Black Sun, given its ubiquitous nature in the Star Wars setting, is an obvious choice and they're the ones who want to keep things the way they are. Baron Kaldo is the Local Boy who wants to get big. The Gorensla kajidic is heavy into smuggling and if the PCs want to play a Hutt, they're a good go-to for jobs. While I don't see CorSec or the Empire giving the Zann Consortium the opportunity to fly Keldabe-class battleships around the sector, I could see smaller, pirate-like, Zann crews sowing chaos. Corporate/government clients are a mainstay of modern and sci-fi crime fiction, so the Corellian Diktat would be a good employer. The Sacorrian Triad is a creepy dictatorship that's likely engaged in underhanded deals.

Having an even number of factions allows me the option of assigning each faction someone they perceive as an ally and someone they perceive as an enemy. This is a good way to keep the waters churning as helping or harming someone will help or hurt someone else.

Assigning each group an ally and an enemy is a good way to keep the waters churning as helping or harming someone will help or hurt someone else. And that will keep the PCs perpetually in-debt to someone as they have to pay off the damage they caused.

  1. Black Sun is allied with the Corellian Diktat as their business interests overlap. Black Sun's primary enemy is the Gorensla kajidic who they see as horning in on their territory.
  2. The Corellian Diktat is allied with Black Sun (see above). The Diktat's primary enemy is the Sacorrian Triad as the Triad won't allow Diktat-backed businesses to operate on Sacorria.
  3. The Sacorrian Triad is allied with the Zann Consortium as the Consortium's ships and resources can be used to hassle its enemies off-world. The Sacorrian Triad's enemies are the Diktat (see above).
  4. The Zann Consortium is allied with the Sacorrian Triad (see above). The Zann Consortium's primary enemy is Baron Kaldo as he keeps them out of the Corellian System.
  5. Baron Kaldo is allied with Gorensla kajidic as they have overlapping business interests. His primary enemy is the Zann Consortium.
  6. Gorensla kajidic is allied with Baron Kaldo (see above). Their primary enemy is Black Sun (see above).

I've also created a table map of the Corellian Sector.

A good Western and a good crime story relies on really strong and really charismatic black hats. For my next post, I'll talk about possible reoccurring NPCs.

Edited by Concise Locket

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On 7/16/2018 at 6:17 AM, AceSolo5 said:

Hi Concise Lockett... any more progress on your next campaign. Always good to hear what you’ve come up with!!

My players and I are still working our way through a The Dracula Dossier game so I haven't had a lot of mental energy to put to this. But... I decided a few weeks ago to swap the Zann Consortium with Guavian Death Gang. I like the idea of using a canonical criminal organization that doesn't have a lot of canonical material written about it.

I'll write up some NPCs in the next few days.

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2 hours ago, Concise Locket said:

 

My players and I are still working our way through a The Dracula Dossier game so I haven't had a lot of mental energy to put to this. But... I decided a few weeks ago to swap the Zann Consortium with Guavian Death Gang. I like the idea of using a canonical criminal organization that doesn't have a lot of canonical material written about it.

I'll write up some NPCs in the next few days.

I generally dislike the Zann Consortium, so I totally support this change.

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Here's what I've come up with for the major NPCs for this campaign. Because this is a game about shifting alliances, these NPCs can serve as either employers or antagonists, depending on choices made. Wherever possible, I adapted existing Legends materials that was scraped from the recesses of Wookieepedia. The Guavian Death Gang stuff I made up almost whole-cloth. I'm sorry if my take doesn't match your personal head canon. 

Black Sun: Vigo Savan is a Falleen of House Sizhran and the niece of Prince Xizor, the Underlord of Black Sun. Most of her family, including the Falleen King, were killed when an Imperial bio-weapons factory on her home world was damaged. To prevent the spread of a contagion, the Imperial military sterilized the city. Savan was off-world at the time with her uncle, attending to Black Sun business.

Savan has maintained a low profile over the years, working herself up through the ranks of her uncle’s criminal empire. When her uncle had Vigo Green executed, she took his place on the council of vigos and inherited his criminal spy network.

Adept at both disguise and strategic planning, she has earned her position through her own willingness to get her hands dirty. Anyone who hints at nepotism on behalf of her uncle finds their necks broken moments later.

Savan maintains her own small estate near the ski resort at Mount Lorrist on the wintry planet of Corfai.

Corellian Diktat: After the dissolution of the Corellian aristocracy 300 years ago, the democratically elected Corellian Council set up a system of governorship that would be led by an individual with the title of Diktat. While the official head of state for Corellia, and rivaling the Sector Moff in political power, the reality is that the Diktat serves as the mouthpiece for Corellia’s business interests.

Daclif Gallamby is the current Diktat. A plain and unassuming Human male with dark hair, sunken eyes, and a thin and colorless face, Gallamby is the architect of Corellia’s unenthusiastic supplication to Imperial power. The Empire's rapid naval power build-up began following the Clone Wars. With the shipyards of major military contractors, such as Kuat, operating at full capacity, Corellia was chosen as another site for construction of Navy ships, including the signature Imperial-class Star Destroyer. Gallamby authorized ground-based manufacturing, a violation of centuries of Corellian environmental standards since the Great Re-Tooling. This led to the fouling of the landscape of Coronet City and a rise in organized criminal activity.

Ship-building returned to orbital facilities after a decade-long spree. The Coronet region has cleaned up its industrial effluvia and resumed its place as a major tourist attraction. Unfortunately, organized crime remains a major problem.

While Gallamby plays the role of protector of Corellia, he takes his marching orders from the Corellian Engineering Corporation, Corellian Mining, and the other corporations that are based on his world. Gallamby lives and works out Corona House, the historical residence and office palace of the chief of state.

Gorensla kajidic: Sorvo the Hutt heads the largest Hutt syndicate operating in the Core Region. While the Gorensla kajidic’s Core operations are paltry in comparison to Black Sun’s, Sorvo is shrewd in both avoiding traps set by the Empire, Black Sun, and Black Sun’s Hutt allies in the Besadii kajidic.

Sorvo’s star rose to prominence after the fall of Ziro the Hutt of Desilijic kajidic. Sweeping up Ziro’s gambling establishments on Coruscant during the final years of the Republic provided him an influx of capital. These credits were redirected into Gorensla kajidic’s primary criminal enterprise: smuggling. With the subsequent smuggling crackdown by the Imperial Navy, Sorvo’s services were in high demand among the independent criminal class in the Core.

Sorvo is an average sized Hutt though he is physically stronger than most. Most Hutts express their displeasure by feeding their victims to pets or having an underling torture or kill them but Sorvo prefers to get his hands dirty by beating them to death. Sorvo’s face can be described as “sleepy.”

Sorvo’s residence is a floating private island on the ecumenopolis world of Dorsis.

Guavian Death Gang: The Guavian Death Gang is a new addition to the Galactic Underworld. Founded by former Brommstaad Mercenaries member Arl Nidder, the Guavian Death Gang provides military services to underworld organizations and engages in its own brand of illegal activity, primarily black-market weapons sales, gun-running, assassination, and kidnapping. Utilizing stolen Gank technology, the group enhances its red-armored foot-soldiers with cybernetics in exchange for loyalty oaths.

The origin of the syndicate’s name is a mystery. Archaeologists associate the name Guavia with an Old Republic war priestess of the Pius Dea era.

Nidder is a Human male, dark-skinned and scarred from years of combat. However, other than a standard prosthetic arm to replace a limb lost to a Black Sun battle droid, he remains wholly Human. Nidder fancies himself as a businessman, a general, and a religious leader. He has a strong bias against non-Humans and does not allow aliens into his organization though he will contract them for work.

The Guavian Death Gang’s primary base of operations is a large, hollowed-out asteroid in the Sileria system.

Kaldo Syndicate: Baron Benton Kaldo (see Suns of Fortune, p. 47 – 48).

Sacorrian Triad: The Sacorrian Triad are the mysterious, tyrannical, and patriarchal rulers of the agrarian planet of Sacorria. It is believed that the Triad is made up of one Human, one Drall, and one Selonian though what passes as a government on Sacorria refuses to comment on the matter. When contracting outside employees, the Triad utilizes droids or scrambled holotransmissions to provide instructions. An employee never knows which member of the Triad he or she is dealing with and will often receive contradictory orders if two members of the Triad are working in opposition.

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On ‎8‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 8:08 AM, Concise Locket said:

With the shipyards of major military contractors, such as Kuat, operating at full capacity, Corellia was chosen as another site for construction of Navy ships, including the signature Imperial-class Star Destroyer. Gallamby authorized ground-based manufacturing, a violation of centuries of Corellian environmental standards since the Great Re-Tooling. This led to the fouling of the landscape of Coronet City and a rise in organized criminal activity

Nice integration.

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