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You laugh now but if you are a kindergarten teacher, and you have a child with undiagnosed pica ( see https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pica_(disorder)), well you can feel grateful of child safety laws when you discover that the said child pilfered a crayola markerin order to sneek off and suck out the ink. Sigh...

Go on and feel morally superior, but remember, a few generations ago, most humans did not make it to ten years old before dying of something we would find shocking.

I know in the UK there used to be child labour, chimney sweeps etc, but "most" not living past 10yrs old? I doubt it, or there would have been no next generation.

 

 

It is an uninformed statement, life expectancy at birth has always been at least 30 to 40. The human lifespan hasn't changed much the last millennia, only the infant mortality number.

 

?? life expectancy has been steadily increasing, partly due to better hygiene conditions and nutrition (and medical care)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_expectancy#/media/File:Life_Expectancy_at_Birth_by_Region_1950-2050.png

 

the height of people has also been steadily increasing. in italy we have old houses in the mountains that have doors you have to bend to enter, because ppl used to be shorter 

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?? life expectancy has been steadily increasing, partly due to better hygiene conditions and nutrition (and medical care)

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_expectancy#/media/File:Life_Expectancy_at_Birth_by_Region_1950-2050.png

 

the height of people has also been steadily increasing. in italy we have old houses in the mountains that have doors you have to bend to enter, because ppl used to be shorter 

 

 

Life expectancy at birth, sure. Child mortality rates have dropped enormously and that really helps the average numbers, same with death giving birth. But if you lived to be 15, you could easily reach 70 even a few centuries ago.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2625386/

 

And Italians are still small. :P.

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You laugh now but if you are a kindergarten teacher, and you have a child with undiagnosed pica ( see https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pica_(disorder)), well you can feel grateful of child safety laws when you discover that the said child pilfered a crayola markerin order to sneek off and suck out the ink. Sigh...

Go on and feel morally superior, but remember, a few generations ago, most humans did not make it to ten years old before dying of something we would find shocking.

I know in the UK there used to be child labour, chimney sweeps etc, but "most" not living past 10yrs old? I doubt it, or there would have been no next generation.

 

 

It is an uninformed statement, life expectancy at birth has always been at least 30 to 40. The human lifespan hasn't changed much the last millennia, only the infant mortality number.

 

I doubt I'm particularly uninformed, I had a good education to Grammar school level, and have since been further educated by HM Armed Forces. I really don't think you know enough about me to suggested I am ignorant. You're talking about children dying to the same extent young men did in WW1 and 2, I am unaware of such levels of death other than in 3rd world countries. I would have thought "most humans did not make it to ten years old before dying" would be common knowledge and, as I said, have had a drastci effect on population levels. 

I was also unaware of the defective cup case with McD, but are you seriously saying most of us need to be informed that hot liquids scald, or naked flames burn. Perhaps hammers should carry a warning sticker that hitting yourself in the face with one may cause damage? 20 yrs ago all this was common sense, which implies a lack of it here and now.

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You laugh now but if you are a kindergarten teacher, and you have a child with undiagnosed pica ( see https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pica_(disorder)), well you can feel grateful of child safety laws when you discover that the said child pilfered a crayola markerin order to sneek off and suck out the ink. Sigh...

Go on and feel morally superior, but remember, a few generations ago, most humans did not make it to ten years old before dying of something we would find shocking.

I know in the UK there used to be child labour, chimney sweeps etc, but "most" not living past 10yrs old? I doubt it, or there would have been no next generation.

 

 

It is an uninformed statement, life expectancy at birth has always been at least 30 to 40. The human lifespan hasn't changed much the last millennia, only the infant mortality number.

 

?? life expectancy has been steadily increasing, partly due to better hygiene conditions and nutrition (and medical care)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_expectancy#/media/File:Life_Expectancy_at_Birth_by_Region_1950-2050.png

 

the height of people has also been steadily increasing. in italy we have old houses in the mountains that have doors you have to bend to enter, because ppl used to be shorter 

 

 

Two things, actually:

 

1) While it's true 'average life expectancy' has increased, what Dagonet was getting at (but worded poorly) is that this isn't reflecting adults living longer so much as the average not being dragged down by high infant mortality.  If you look at the number from the perspective of 'average age of death by natural causes from people who reach adulthood'...then no, the number really has been pretty flat for a very, very long time.  We've increased the AVERAGE by reducing the very early deaths, and reduced or eliminated a number of diseases commonly leading to death...but overall the 'average age of death by natural causes of people who reach adulthood' has been a pretty static number for as long as we have had written records.

 

2) The 'people used to be smaller' thing is not strictly true.  A couple things lead to the belief - one of those being, indeed, the "rooms and doors from old buildings are so much smaller than new buildings".  But the thing is - that was more a design choice than anything.  When your ability to create an environmental seal is limited, ANY opening in a structure is going to be a problem for retaining heat, so you make all the openings as small as possible.  Similarly, when your only source of heat is a point source (single fireplace in the house), you make all the rooms have very low ceilings - heat rises, after all, and having hot air floating above anyone who could feel it also does no good.  (A second reason for that belief stems from units of measure - but those have changed over time, so are not comparable)

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. I would have thought "most humans did not make it to ten years old before dying" would be common knowledge

 

Nah, because it plain isn't true.

 

 

 

 

I was also unaware of the defective cup case with McD, but are you seriously saying most of us need to be informed that hot liquids scald, or naked flames burn. Perhaps hammers should carry a warning sticker that hitting yourself in the face with one may cause damage? 20 yrs ago all this was common sense, which implies a lack of it here and now.

 

 

No, I am not. And it also isn't a matter of lack of common sense. It is mainly a matter of legal loopholes.

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Absolutely, if you eliminated all cause of death outside of reaching the end cell mittose ability than our life expectancy has not change at all. Usually you die long before that by cancer anyway. ;-)

 

edit: Thinking about it, I don't think we have a single case reaching that point yet, even when some people assume that my generation has a chance to actually reach this and star wars human characters are indeed supposed to get that old.  ;-)

Edited by SEApocalypse

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...Ahem... So I am willing to tone down "most" to "many". Yes, many children died from childhood illnesses, but many also died from common living conditions. I recall, very well, that while visiting the historic, Salem homes in Mass, they had poles to leash children so they wouldn't play too close to the large cooking-fire. Also, before indoor plumbing, many people would gather water from local ponds and rivers. They could slip in the muddy shore and find their wool clothing weighing them down in almost, freezing water. So, water was an easy place for people to drown.

Finally, speaking of children putting things in their mouths, naturally, bright colors on plants and animals is frequently a sign of being poisonous! So imagine a small child who finds bright berries or wild mushrooms and then to poison themselves because Mom nor Dad was not directly watching their children.

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Just for laughts...

If you are in the USA and you play.with your 12 years old son...can somebody start legal actions against you???

 

Depends what your playing... :D

 

Cops and robbers with real guns

 

Cowboys and Indians (That's native american!)

but what about India? A cowboy can go to India. If he wants. I think.

I guess a Cowboy could take a trip to India, but I think raising cows for beef is illegal there, so he'd be unemployed.

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?? life expectancy has been steadily increasing, partly due to better hygiene conditions and nutrition (and medical care)

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_expectancy#/media/File:Life_Expectancy_at_Birth_by_Region_1950-2050.png

 

the height of people has also been steadily increasing. in italy we have old houses in the mountains that have doors you have to bend to enter, because ppl used to be shorter 

 

 

Life expectancy at birth, sure. Child mortality rates have dropped enormously and that really helps the average numbers, same with death giving birth. But if you lived to be 15, you could easily reach 70 even a few centuries ago.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2625386/

 

And Italians are still small. :P.

 

Ummmmm.  So he stripped out people who died before the age of 15, people who died as a result of murder or serving in a military, and people who died of illness.  What good is that?  I guess the point is that, from an evolutionary standpoint, humans are about the same as they were 5000 years ago?  OK?  

 

The fact is that a hugely significant percentage of people died before the age of 15,d died as a result of murder or serving in a military, and died of illness.  That has a dramatic effect on average life expectancy.  I believe a more accurate statement would be that the maximum human lifespan has not changed much in the last few thousand years.  I can get behind that.

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?? life expectancy has been steadily increasing, partly due to better hygiene conditions and nutrition (and medical care)

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_expectancy#/media/File:Life_Expectancy_at_Birth_by_Region_1950-2050.png

 

the height of people has also been steadily increasing. in italy we have old houses in the mountains that have doors you have to bend to enter, because ppl used to be shorter 

 

 

Life expectancy at birth, sure. Child mortality rates have dropped enormously and that really helps the average numbers, same with death giving birth. But if you lived to be 15, you could easily reach 70 even a few centuries ago.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2625386/

 

And Italians are still small. :P.

 

 

from the article you cite "although this data must of necessity refer to privileged members of society" who I add got better food, and slightly better hygienic conditions on average. so I'm not sure their conclusions are fully proved, also due to the limited reliability of their data from ancient times.

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On the McDonalds hot coffee issue, didn't the lawsuit result in lower coffee temperatures being served to the public?  Once they saw that the 700 people who were injured every year could get $3M each (or even a lower $600k), it made business sense to lower the temp and suffer the potential loss in customers.

 

Just like it was demonstrated in Fight Club.  A= number of lawsuits, B = Average settlement of a lawsuit, C = A * B.  If C is less than the cost of a recall, we don't do the recall.

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I'm think I read "contains peanuts" in jars of peanut butter, and "contains milk" in either milk or yoghurt containers.

Or the phrase "may contain traces of nuts or seeds" on a pack of peanuts.

I want more than 'traces' in my salted nuts.

 

 

 

Are we still doing phrasing?

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My eight year old loves the game.  I'm not worried about the game hurting her (swallowing pieces, etc.), but she did sit on my B-Wing and break it off the connector.  Easy enough to fix though.  But maybe the warning is equally for the fragility of the game as well.

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"The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers"

 

-William Shakespeare

Probably the most frequently taken out of context quote in all of history.

In the context of the play, what is basically being said is

"If you want to destabilize a country and plunge it into anarchy, the first thing you do is kill all the lawyers"

 

Just like a lawyer to take all the fun out of something!  :P

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"The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers"

 

-William Shakespeare

Probably the most frequently taken out of context quote in all of history.

In the context of the play, what is basically being said is

"If you want to destabilize a country and plunge it into anarchy, the first thing you do is kill all the lawyers"

 

 

Still sounds like a plan to me... ;)

 

That reminds me: Wizkids once made a game called horrorclix. One of the models was a zombie lawyer. (A zombified lawyer, not a lawyer representing the undead in court!) The flavor tekst had the Shakespeare quote followed by "If only that was still possible now."

 

144678.jpg

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So if I step on an X-wing and stub my toe, who can I sue to get more money for more X-wing products! :P

 

If that would work, LEGO would have been out of buisness decades ago. :)

And every single copy of Twilight Imperium sold would have lead to crippling lawsuits against FFG. Stupid War Suns...

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Quite a little bit too much. When I was 12 I was delighted mixing flamable liquids in my chemistry lab "recomended ages 10+". I only burned myself four or five times...

On my opinion, a "normal" 12 years old boy will not eat a peg. Perhaps a little too restrictive. But the first time visited the USA I was surprised when I read "Caution - Hot" printed on a ready to take away coffe... Those funny lawyers...

 

No, but they might snap the wings off by mistake.

 

It's to emphasise that the models aren't toys: they're not durable enough to be handled roughly.

Edited by Blue Five

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