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MorbidDon

Ubiquitous Items & You

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So I was doing character creation with a few new players recently - when we got the the last step after spending XP - selecting starting gear where I had an idea...

 

Thinking Man's Game

To me RPGs are a thinking man's game - where you figure out solutions to problems (i.e. all stories have conflict) whether they be momentary or otherwise. By the game's default content there are three types of challenges; combat, social, and exploration - herein is the story's conflict!

 

So back to basics

 

McGuyver comes to mind - here's a "character" who can say... escape a prison cell with little more that some shoe lace and a few odd bits laying around - i.e. ubiquitous items!

 

Now he's the very extreme of course as to what is possible with everyday normal objects - fine... but what about the PCs playing the game - don't they have ideas - isn't this a thinking man's game - rather than math practice?!

 

Math Practice = everything is defined by your rolls and you do no thinking - sort of like cruise control LOL

 

Bags, Barrels, and Buckets...

 

These objects are not listed by default in the Equipment section of the CORE - which is fine but for some unique or cleverly strategized items on their person can make or break a challenge (combta, social, exploration).

 

Exploration = I want rope "F" an Grapnel that I have to roll for - I opt for a Iron Hook and Rope - both ubiquitous!

 

And thats my point - sure your in the 41st millennia doesn't mean now humans are able to do anything naked - rather this game while focused on bigger pursuits is at the end of the day a game about adventuring whether that be on a Voidship, city, sewers, or any other locale worthy of his holy attention!

 

Stay GAMING

Morbid

Edited by MorbidDon

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Attire / Regalia
Apron (waist down), cloth
Apron (full length), cloth
Apron (full length), leather
Belt
- Belt, common
- Belt, Knight's or Lady's
- Belt, rope (no buckle)
- Belt, cloth (no buckle)
- Belt, cloth (with buckle)
- Belt, leather (no buckle)
- Belt, leather (with buckle)
Bodice - plain
Bodice - fancy
Boots
- Hip High or Riding
- Low or Soft
- Hobnailed or Work
Breeches
- Breeks, cotton
- Breeks, silk
Chemise (shirt), wool
Chemise (shirt), cotton
Chemise (shirt), linen
Chemise (shirt), leather
Chemise (shirt), silk
Cloak
- Good cloth
- Fine fur
Codpiece, leather
Codpiece, iron / brass / bronze
Codpiece, silver / gold
Doublet - plain
Doublet - fancy
Eye patch, leather
Feathered Head-Dress
Girdle
Gloves
Gown, common
Hats
- Hat, brimmed - leather
- Hat, brimmed - rabbit fur felt
- Hat, brimmed - bamboo / straw
- Hat, cap
Hood, or Bonnet
Hose or Stockings
Jacket, Jerkin or Coat
Kirtle or Dress
Loincloth
Mittens
Pin
Plain brooch
Robe
Common
Embroidered
Sandals
Sash
Shirt, cloth
Shirt, silk
Surcoat, plain
Surcoat, silk
Sword baldric
Sword hanger
Sword scabbard
Tabard
Toga, coarse cloth
Toga, linen
Toga, wool
Trousers, plain
Trousers, fancy
Tunic
Turban
Vests
- Vest, plain
- Vest, fancy

Edited by MorbidDon

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Equipment / Gear / Paraphernalia
Amphora
Tiny
Small
Medium
Backpack
Barrel, small
Basket
Large
Small
Bedroll, Heavy
Bedroll, Light
Bell
Belt pouch
Large
Small
Block and tackle
Bolt case
Bucket
Case (Map or Scroll)
Cask
Chain (per ft.)
Heavy
Light
Chest
Large
Small
Cloth (per 10 sq. yds.)
Common
Fine
Rich
Candle
Canvas (per sq. yard)
Chalk
Charcoal (4 hours)
Chisel
Climbing Pick
Crampons
Crowbar
Decanter (Glass)
Fire-Starting Bow
Fishhook
Fishing net, 10 ft. sq.
Flask
Flint and steel
Framepack
Glass bottle
Grappling hook
Hammock
Holy item (symbol, water, etc.)
Hourglass
Ink
Iron pot
Jug (Clay)
Ladder, 10ft.
Lantern
Beacon
Bullseye
Hooded
Lock
Good
Poor
Lockpicks
Magnifying glass
Manacles (Lowly)
Manacles (Masterwork)
Map or scroll case
Marbles, per bag of 20
Merchant's scale
Mirror, small metal
Musical instrument
Nails (Iron 3" Length) x20
Oar
Oil (per flask)
Greek fire
Lamp
Lockpicks
Lowly
Masterwork
Paddle
Paper (per sheet)
Papyrus (per sheet)
Parchment (per sheet)
Pegs (x10 Wood)
Perfume (per vial)
Pick (Miners)
Pitons (x10 Iron)
Pitcher (Clay)
Plank of Wood
Pliers
Pole (Wooden)
Quill-Pens (x10)
Quiver
Ram, Portable
Rope (per 50 ft.)
Hemp
Silk
Sack
Large
Small
Saw
Scissors / Shears
Sealing/candle wax (per lb.)
Sewing needle
Signal whistle (1 mile range)
Signet ring
Snowshoes
Soap (per lb.)
Spade
Sun Dial
Spyglass
Tent
Large
Pavilion
Small
Tinderbox (enough for 7 fires)
Torch
Vial
Water clock
Wedge, Staying (Hardwood)
Wedge, Splitting (Iron)
Whetstone
Wineskin
Winter blanket
Wire, 10 gauge (Iron)

Edited by MorbidDon

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If a player asks "Do I have x ?" where x is an item that:

 - Makes sense for them to have on them right now

 - Makes sense why nobody mentioned it before.

 - Sounds like something easily acquired.

 

Then I'd probably say 'yes'. I like seeing players make creative use of such things.

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I would suggest you don't give them a "magic hat" full of ubiquitous goodies - make them think about what they got and why - most importantly is item bulk - sure you can dead lift a ton of weight but at the end of the day all those hammers, wrenches, rope (hemp rope coil of 50' was 20 lbs. in D&D), etc...

 

Goes back to thinking man - you make them plan, stage, and think - they will deliver clever ideas and surprised for you - the GM!

 

Stay GAMING

Morbid

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I would suggest you don't give them a "magic hat" full of ubiquitous goodies - make them think about what they got and why - most importantly is item bulk - sure you can dead lift a ton of weight but at the end of the day all those hammers, wrenches, rope (hemp rope coil of 50' was 20 lbs. in D&D), etc...

 

Oh, they still have to think about that. They have to justify having that specific item. For example, if they are disguised as a repair crew to infiltrate somewhere they could justify having a screwdriver easily. Justifying a screwdriver when pretending to be nobles is much harder.

 

Carry lots of bulk and they have a hard time justifying why nobody commented. Some items, like a good amount of rope, are almost never going to go unnoticed.

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Justification is key. Laundry list inventories are not.

 

Going back to the MacGuyver example; in one of the first episodes (might even be ep.1, I believe), he's shown to pick up a bunch of chocolate bars from a broken vending machine and stuff them in his bag. His explanation? They might be handy.

 

Now, in an RPG, I'd adjudicate this retroactively. i.e. if, at some point in the story, it becomes relevant for a character to have chocolate and I'd mentioned that there was a broken vending machine earlier on, rather than have the players back-track to the vending machine, I'm happy to say that someone happened to pick one up as they passed. It's not necessary for them, at the time, to say "I'm picking up chocolate bars" and writing them in their inventory, only that they justify having one retroactively by pointing out that they passed the vending machine earlier.

 

This can apply to many things. Need a pin? Well, you mentioned you were putting on your glad-rags, so yeah, I'll accept that you've probably got a brooch or earring that would suffice. Same goes for belts, coats, boots and bags. No-one needs to know that you've got exactly three hair-pins, two paper-clips and a spare belt. We just need to know why you have them; i.e because you're wearing your hair up, you've got a dossier on the Duke you're meeting and that earlier in the day, your nephew called and asked you to buy him a new belt. Obviously this doesn't fly if you're bald, aren't meeting a Duke and haven't been anywhere near a belt shop.

 

You can only take this so far, however. If you try to claim that you've been lugging an anvil around because you passed through a forge on the way, you're plumb out of luck. That's a little too specific, too large an item to hand-wave and probably too heavy an item to carry in the first place. Same goes for unique items, like keys or documents, as well as other bulky, inconvenient or over the top items. So no, you can't carry a dozen bolters around to sell later and if you really wanted to bring the Necronomicon with you from that library, you probably should have mentioned it, because you'd have had to make some checks to convince the librarian you're not a cultist or sneak it out.

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