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Geressen

Interdictors cannot stop the millenium falcon.

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If the hyperdrive is supposed to turn off if the spaceship hits gravity how were they able to jump to inside starkillers athmosphere?

Because JJ.

 

He doesn't understand that doing certain things fundamentally breaks how a setting works, 

I'm saying it does work , IT IS WORKING BETTER THAN EVER!  do you people even READ?!

 

not the millenium falcon though, that thing is not OSHA compliant, but neither is most evil base architecture, install some railings stormies.

Edited by Geressen

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The Falcon was also travelling straight towards Starkiller Base, so gravity wouldn't pull the Falcon out of Hyperspace since the gravity from Starkiller Base is pulling the Falcon towards it. If you don't exit Hyperspace, or if the failsafe doesn't exit Hyperspace for you, you just smash into the planet's Mass Shadow.

 

The way I envisioned gravity stopping ships from jumping to Hyperspace is that the pull of gravity prevents a ship from jumping to lightspeed because gravity holds the ship back (Basically gravity is a negative acceleration on the hyperdrive's required acceleration/velocity to lightspeed.)
Now for an Interdictor, I always envisioned that they projected gravity wells, basically spheroid shapes in space (like in the West End RPG diagrams, see below). If you have a working failsafe, it cuts out in front of the gravity well, if you have it disabled, besides it being super dangerous, whenever you pass through a gravity well sphere, when you try to leave it (not when entering it, since gravity would pull you the center of the sphere) gravity starts pulling back on your ship and pulls you out of Hyperspace. Maybe this would damage the hyperdrive as well due to stress.

 

tumblr_inline_nwi1htbGSc1sq4sib_1280.jpg

 

 

Edited by VikingMaekel

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I can't answer the MF/Hyperdrive question, but I think I know how the protagonists were able to look up and see the Hosnian system being destroyed in the sky!

 

Starkiller wasn't a typical laser weapon. It used a form of dark energy called "quintessence" which it turned into Phantom energy for the purposes of it's firing. I'm guessing that the base was designed not only to utilize this unique source of energy to turn stars into weapons, but also produced some sort of lensing effect to magnify the image of the planets' destruction and send it out as a picture at faster-than-light speeds. Anyone looking towards that region of space, from however far away in the galaxy, would see the image of the Hosnian system being destroyed at a larger-than-normally-possible scale.

 

Which basically boils down to "Sith space magic," but hey, it's Star Wars.

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Because JJ.

 

He doesn't understand that doing certain things fundamentally breaks how a setting works, or worse, maybe doesn't care.

 

You can't blame JJ because the exact same thing happens in an episode of The Clone Wars. A ship enters hyperspace within the atmosphere of a planet and then exits it very close to the ground of another. It crashes but nobody dies. [season 1 Episode 13]

 

So TFA isn't changing how the universe works in this case. Just repeating something that's already been done. So you can't chalk it up to an advance in technology either. 

 

I just explain it by saying that the Interdictor has a "Hyperdrive Dampening System" which also avoid the issue of the ship's gravity field not actually affecting the gravity in real space. Otherwise, it could be used to move enemy ships by creating massive gravity fields around them.

Edited by Hedgehobbit

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The Falcon was also travelling straight towards Starkiller Base, so gravity wouldn't pull the Falcon out of Hyperspace since the gravity from Starkiller Base is pulling the Falcon towards it. If you don't exit Hyperspace, or if the failsafe doesn't exit Hyperspace for you, you just smash into the planet's Mass Shadow.

 

The way I envisioned gravity stopping ships from jumping to Hyperspace is that the pull of gravity prevents a ship from jumping to lightspeed because gravity holds the ship back (Basically gravity is a negative acceleration on the hyperdrive's required acceleration/velocity to lightspeed.)

Now for an Interdictor, I always envisioned that they projected gravity wells, basically spheroid shapes in space (like in the West End RPG diagrams, see below). If you have a working failsafe, it cuts out in front of the gravity well, if you have it disabled, besides it being super dangerous, whenever you pass through a gravity well sphere, when you try to leave it (not when entering it, since gravity would pull you the center of the sphere) gravity starts pulling back on your ship and pulls you out of Hyperspace. Maybe this would damage the hyperdrive as well due to stress.

 

tumblr_inline_nwi1htbGSc1sq4sib_1280.jpg

That strike cruiser looks like it really wants to get inside that target ship...

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So if a gravity well only affects a ship's hyperdrive safety systems, causing the auto-pilot to return the ship to real-space for safety reasons, then how do Interdictors work? For ambushes, great. You'd be mad to fly around without your safeties on because you'd just plow into a planet and die. But for blockading and checkpoint duties... wouldn't rebel/scum ships just turn their safeties off and jump to hyperspace with impunity?

Hang on, maybe that's why we never saw any at Hoth...

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I thought the whole falcon jumping out of light speed into the star killers atmosphere was just far too easy. It's kind of like they couldn't come up with a good way for them to get onto the planet and disable the shield so they just said screw it, they come out of hyperspace under the shield. If the falcon could have done that in ROTJ couldn't they have just come out of hyperspace inside the Death Star's shield and flown right into the uncompleted Death Star....

 

That being said there were a lot of things done that don't make sense especially showing the Star Killers red beam visible from Takodanna's surface blowing up the Hosnian System....It would have to be at least several light years away even if it was a neighboring system which according to the newly released maps in one of the books it is not. Even at just a light year away you wouldn't be able to see the beam explode several planets that far away and for some reason if the beam was bright enough to be seen it would take a year for the light to travel to Takodanna to be seen by Finn....Anyway just because it makes no sense doesn't mean it wasn't an awesome movie. I really enjoyed the movie even with such idiotic inclusions as those. 

the beam is shot trough hyperspace, so the light can be seen because it is faster than light. like a car that is going 100 miles per hour is faster than one going 50 :D

 

 

That makes no sense. 

Real answer is that its only a movie, and not a very well written one.

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Presumably, the relevant safeties can't be disengaged that quickly. It seems safe to presume that Han had at least an hour or three to prepare for the Starkiller attack, he could have done it then. If it takes that long to properly rewire your hyperdrive, it would explain why it can't easily be done in the thick of combat.

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Presumably, the relevant safeties can't be disengaged that quickly. It seems safe to presume that Han had at least an hour or three to prepare for the Starkiller attack, he could have done it then. If it takes that long to properly rewire your hyperdrive, it would explain why it can't easily be done in the thick of combat.

Right, but if you're planet bound and trying to get past an Imperial blockade that is utilising an Interdictor to prevent traffic leaving the area, you'd have plenty of time to override your safeties and just fly right on by.

That works for me.

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Because JJ.

 

He doesn't understand that doing certain things fundamentally breaks how a setting works, or worse, maybe doesn't care.

 

You can't blame JJ because the exact same thing happens in an episode of The Clone Wars. A ship enters hyperspace within the atmosphere of a planet and then exits it very close to the ground of another. It crashes but nobody dies. [season 1 Episode 13]

 

So TFA isn't changing how the universe works in this case. Just repeating something that's already been done. So you can't chalk it up to an advance in technology either.

Ok. I haven't seen the Clone Wars cartoon so I didn't realise. Ok, guess that isn't necessarily down to him. I can still hold him responsible for the other problems unrelated to hyperdrives, which have direct precedence in the Star Trek films. Him being the common denominator between those films, I feel confident that he was heavily involved in that flawed decision making.

 

 

 

If the hyperdrive is supposed to turn off if the spaceship hits gravity how were they able to jump to inside starkillers athmosphere?

Because JJ.

 

He doesn't understand that doing certain things fundamentally breaks how a setting works, 

I'm saying it does work , IT IS WORKING BETTER THAN EVER!  do you people even READ?!

Yes, I saw that. I just think you are giving things too much credit, and if at all possible that event should be wiped from memory, because it calls into question a whole load of stuff the writers clearly didn't think of. As one of the writers, the director, and a history of similar gaffs with the Star Trek films, I place the blame for these things quite heavily on JJ. Ok... as my comment above, maybe JJ wasn't responsible for this one, but I doubt much thought was put into the repercussions of making changes like this.

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Yes I agree on that point,

 

to the people saying he pulled levers to go out of hyperspace; of course he does, if you go down an elevator does it get lowered down slowly by cables and mechanisms or are you simply dropped untill stopped by safety features?

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Right, but pulling levers to drop out of hyperspace is a little... silly. Moving at those speeds, if you misjudged by even a hundredth of a second you'd either over-shoot your mark by millions of kilometers. Or undershoot it. The levers have to be something else, like engaging some kind of sub-light shielding or gravity compensators or something.

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But Rebels (Canon) the interductor DOES pull ships out of hyper and prevent ships from entering.

 

Maybe its something like ships can fly through the grav well, but you cause serious damage to the whole hyperdrive and associated systems.  (Think hitting the water while going to fast = same a hitting a brick wall)  Same with jumping while in the well.  It can be done, but you your drive WILL be fried when you get to where you are going, if you can even get there before it fails.  What good is escaping if you are stuck in the middle of nowhere (Think of in Heir to the Empire when Luke damages his hyper, it fails a shot distance away).

 

TFA could be explained as Han knew what he was flying into and able to wire the Falcon to minimize the damage.  Such modifications would cause more damage in the long run, but for a single mission was an acceptable risk.  Also had a short jump preplanned so if the system did fail, they knew where to look for the Falcon and go help them.

Edited by Salted Diamond

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Or maybe the Cell in Rebels didn't disengage the gravity well safeties. I imagine that doing so without frying the drive would take extensive knowledge of hyperdrive systems, and for a capital ship I wouldn't be shocked if it required a docking facility of some kind. (Smaller ships like the Falcon could probably have it done in a decently equipped hanger bay.) We also don't know when Han disengaged the safety or how long it took to do so.

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Yeah... if my RPG group turned off the safeties on their hyperdrive, I'd make them roll a skill check on the table in front of them. You know what happens if they fail? The ship is splattered, and they are never seen in this universe again. (And they would understand this before the check. )

 

So, yes. I don't mind it. It was RISKY. You do not do this all the time, do you take the brakes out of your car, drive to work at the speed limit, and coast to a precise stop at work? Would you do this all the time?

 

Also, when a ship hits a planet in hyperspace, there is NO damage in this universe to the planet. I seem to remember that there was a Star Wars story where some smart-ass writer hyperspaced a ship into a planet and caused a MASSIVE (kinetic energy) explosion. 

 

NOPE.

 

If it was that easy to make a super weapon out of a hyperdrive, the Empire would retire ships hulls into rebel planets all the time.

Edited by OrangeCat

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Hmm, I like that. It might not be entirely in 'lockstep with that whole EU doomsday bullet theme (I thought that was a Clone Wars thing), but I like the idea that it interacts with the hyperspace shadow and the ship just sort of disappears into the ether. And there it stays, never to be heard of again except in rumours and tales told at taverns across the Galaxy.

 

Otherwise yeah, decommission a CR-70 from Jarrnodd's Junkyard Bargains, slap on another Imperial Cog, get a single loyal trooper to 'twist the knobs and pull the levers' and bang... the Empire's able to afford a more contemporary shade of paint for their Star Destroyers instead of sinking money into Project 'It'll Definitely Work This Time' IV.

 

Sometimes I wonder just how the navicomputers work for calculating jump points from the origin (and how they get that origin point) to termination.  Didn't an Interdictor have an ECM suite and jammers?  -shrugs- might work on that to make the idea of trying to jump even more ridiculously dangerous. Just postulation, of course.

Edited by Vykes

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Yeah... if my RPG group turned off the safeties on their hyperdrive, I'd make them roll a skill check on the table in front of them. You know what happens if they fail? The ship is splattered, and they are never seen in this universe again. (And they would understand this before the check. )

 

So, yes. I don't mind it. It was RISKY. You do not do this all the time, do you take the brakes out of your car, drive to work at the speed limit, and coast to a precise stop at work? Would you do this all the time?

 

Also, when a ship hits a planet in hyperspace, there is NO damage in this universe to the planet. I seem to remember that there was a Star Wars story where some smart-ass writer hyperspaced a ship into a planet and caused a MASSIVE (kinetic energy) explosion. 

 

NOPE.

 

If it was that easy to make a super weapon out of a hyperdrive, the Empire would retire ships hulls into rebel planets all the time.

 

Too bad for you that there is no evidence that hitting a planet in hyperspace causes no damage and the idea it would not do any damage makes absolutely no sense.

Edited by RogueCorona

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It works with the "Hyperdrive is another dimension" concept - it's one-way - realspace objects project mass shadows into hyperspace - but that doesn't mean the objects themselve exist in hyperspace to be interacted with.

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It requires objects in realspace being able to destroy those in hyperspace without suffering any harm themselves.

 

Until we actually see what happens when a ship in hyperspace crashes into a planet's mass shadow there is no way to prove how much damage such an impact would inflict on a planet. It could destroy the planet, do little or no harm, or anything in between.

 

And regarding the whole "if a ship hyperspacing into a planet is massively destructive the Empire would do it." claim the Empire wants superweapons it can control. It does not want everyone with access to a hyperspace capable ship knowing those ships can serve as superweapons because it can never control every hyperdrive equipped ship in the setting.

Edited by RogueCorona

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I feel there is "slight" evidence that the danger is to the ship.  Han's comment to Luke in ANH about flying too close to a star "...and that would end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?" seems  to indicate it would risk  the ship, not the object. 

 

Theory, the grav wells of planets squeeze the "channel" a ship travels is hyper.  If you don't drop out before it closes too much, you get torn apart.  That's why you have safeties to drop out before you hit.  Very risky to try jumping too close.  You drop out too close to stop or wait a second too long and get crushed.  That's how Interdictors work, they kick in the safeties to drop you out and cause the "channel" to narrow and make it harder to jump away.

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Yeah... if my RPG group turned off the safeties on their hyperdrive, I'd make them roll a skill check on the table in front of them. You know what happens if they fail? The ship is splattered, and they are never seen in this universe again. (And they would understand this before the check. )

 

The main utility of doing so, I imagine would be to escape from a planet.

 

You know the scene: the intrepid heroes are trying to get out of Dodge and they have TIE fighters on their tail (just like in ANH... and ESB), but they have to get out of the gravity well before they can make the jump, rather than the astrogation check being the hold-up. Depending on how much damage they're taking on, and the skill of the astrogator, it might be worth it.

 

In the case of an interdictor cruiser, however, it seems like the whole idea of that ship is in order to entrap ships moving through hyperspace, and prevent others from leaving. In the latter case, given that their gravity well is essentially fictitious, there's no cost to overriding the safeties other than the time it takes to do so - unless that gravity well would alter the course of a ship at lightspeed (sans safeties) and potentially steer it into an object, like a nearby planet or star.

Edited by Mikael Hasselstein

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I feel there is "slight" evidence that the danger is to the ship.  Han's comment to Luke in ANH about flying too close to a star "...and that would end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?" seems  to indicate it would risk  the ship, not the object. 

 

Theory, the grav wells of planets squeeze the "channel" a ship travels is hyper.  If you don't drop out before it closes too much, you get torn apart.  That's why you have safeties to drop out before you hit.  Very risky to try jumping too close.  You drop out too close to stop or wait a second too long and get crushed.  That's how Interdictors work, they kick in the safeties to drop you out and cause the "channel" to narrow and make it harder to jump away.

 

 

Yeah but note that Han doesn't mention planets in that discussion.

 

"bounce too close to a star or fly right through a supernova"

 

 

No mention of planets at all

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I feel there is "slight" evidence that the danger is to the ship.  Han's comment to Luke in ANH about flying too close to a star "...and that would end your trip real quick, wouldn't it?" seems  to indicate it would risk  the ship, not the object. 

 

Theory, the grav wells of planets squeeze the "channel" a ship travels is hyper.  If you don't drop out before it closes too much, you get torn apart.  That's why you have safeties to drop out before you hit.  Very risky to try jumping too close.  You drop out too close to stop or wait a second too long and get crushed.  That's how Interdictors work, they kick in the safeties to drop you out and cause the "channel" to narrow and make it harder to jump away.

 

 

Yeah but note that Han doesn't mention planets in that discussion.

 

"bounce too close to a star or fly right through a supernova"

 

 

No mention of planets at all

 

True, but they are still stellar objects.  And a sun would have a greater mass shadow.  The theory still stands though as going "though a supernova" is a bad thing, it means you can't just fly though a something at hyper.

Edited by Salted Diamond

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furthermore if planets don't count then how exactly do blockades work in star wars? 

 

in ESB they had to fly away from hoth past star destroyers, in (urgh) TPM they had to fly away from naboo and trough a load of ships.

 

Just because Han isn't specifically mentioning EVERYTHING like some sort of autistic spacefaring computer doesn

t mean planets do not count as having mass and subsequent gravitational effects.

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