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Some of you have already helped me in a previous post and that has really helped but i wanted to start a different topic since i am now trying my hand at a home brew. I have a basic idea on the really big picture of what I want to happen during the campaign. Do you guys have any tips tricks to campaign building that you want to share. I am having some issues with the finer details and specific encounters. I dont want them to be to hard but i also dont want them to fly through them to fast as its taking a long time to lay the ground work. I hear a lot of it depends on what you want to do but as a new GM and new to table top RPG in general I dont exactly know what i want. I have been told i am a good GM from players that have been doing this for a long time but that is primarily coming from my imagination on the fly, knowledge of the star wars universe, knowledge of the basic rules, and ability to keep the game moving. Home brews are a little harder for me and i could use some advise.   

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I've found the "Plot Point" type of method works pretty good.  Basically, if you have an idea of a campaign plot thread, then you can lay those out for specific points the characters need to hit to progress the campaign.  Those "points" can be as large (multiple session long adventure) or as small (one shot adventure) as you want them to be.  For instance, I didn't homebrew the campaign I'm currently running, but I did string along pre-published adventures in such a way to get them through my plot points.  I knew my players wanted to end up joining the rebellion because I asked them what they wanted to do.  So, I took them through the beginner's box adventure for EotE to introduce them to the game.  Then did Long Arm of the Hutt knowing that the Sullistan (Mu Nabb sp?) in that adventure would be seen again in the future.  I had the main NPC in that adventure be related to the main NPC in Beyond the Rim knowing full well at the end of Beyond the Rim was gonna be an "escape" to a hidden base.  I just made it part of the Rebellion.  They went on a couple of adventures between those main points, Debts to Pay, and I might've had a homebrew or "off the cuff" adventure for them sprinkled in there.  Ultimately, they got to the end of our "Episode I" by joining the Rebellion.

 

As far as specific encounters, all I can say is just start creating your own set pieces.  There is a great podcast called "The Order 66" and in episode 11, GM's Holocron 2.0, they do a great job of walking your through how to create them.  I wouldn't worry too much about how quick your players fly through your baddies and encounters because it just let's you know where you can make it harder and more challenging for next time.  I suggest getting the three packs of the adversary cards (Scum and Villany, Citizens of the Galaxy, and Imperial and Rebels) because they are SUCH an easy resource to pull out for that "on the fly" encounter you need.  I wish they would make decks for vehicles/starships.  (Hint, Hint, FFG!!! =)

 

Anyways, I'll end it here and good luck!

 

Z

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so, there are several new GMs in our group (for my birthday we are breaking out a bunch of the modules and having everyone run one in a "round robin")  One of the things I am doing to help them out is making a set of "cards" that have the stats for several baddies the group is likely to come across.  For example, storm troopers, pirates, hired guns/mercs, a few bounty hunters, etc.  I am making them varying difficulties so that if the GM feels things are moving to smoothly, or wants to shake things up, they have that option at their fingertips instead of having to chase down stats for a specific baddie.

 

This also helps when players take a game "off the rails" (which happens often to all of us).  If, for example, the group wants to go to the local junk shop and threaten the owner into paying them a "protection fee", maybe the junkyard dealer is already 'protected' by the local thugs, or maybe there just happens to be a squad of stormtroopers that rush over when they hear the scuffle.

 

Just a thought.

 

Most of the games we run are a mixture of homebrew and modules, and what I try to do is write out a longer plotline that ties it all together.  I try and have an end goal, like defeating the escaped sith master, or overthrowing the imperial presence on a specific planet.  With that main goal, I can then insert facts, baddies, hints, and encounters that push toward that goal.  It doesn't mean that every session needs to be pointed in that direction, but maybe they find a clue, or a piece of equipment that help them in that goal.

 

For example, my main goal for this part of the campaign is pushing the imperial presence off of Titus (just a name out of a hat).  So, I already know I will want the group working 'with' the rebellion, even if they aren't a part of the rebellion.  So as they are making their way, doing missions to scratch out a place among the stars, they are also gaining resources (maybe some fighters) maybe political of financial pull for the rebellion with the local leaders.  The players all know that they want Titus to be free of imperial control, so they are also looking for things to do to further that goal.  Maybe its sneaking in to one of the three orbital platforms and grabbing a special ship (ala "shell game"), or maybe it is breaking into a base on the surface and getting its communication station (like the AoR box set), these still work if your group isn't straight rebellion, and can be great pieces to pull things together as a team.  You can even pull from jewel of yavin or beyond the rim for ideas and resources.

 

Just a thought.  Good luck!

 

--trial

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I've found the "Plot Point" type of method works pretty good.  Basically, if you have an idea of a campaign plot thread, then you can lay those out for specific points the characters need to hit to progress the campaign.  Those "points" can be as large (multiple session long adventure) or as small (one shot adventure) as you want them to be.  For instance, I didn't homebrew the campaign I'm currently running, but I did string along pre-published adventures in such a way to get them through my plot points.  I knew my players wanted to end up joining the rebellion because I asked them what they wanted to do.  So, I took them through the beginner's box adventure for EotE to introduce them to the game.  Then did Long Arm of the Hutt knowing that the Sullistan (Mu Nabb sp?) in that adventure would be seen again in the future.  I had the main NPC in that adventure be related to the main NPC in Beyond the Rim knowing full well at the end of Beyond the Rim was gonna be an "escape" to a hidden base.  I just made it part of the Rebellion.  They went on a couple of adventures between those main points, Debts to Pay, and I might've had a homebrew or "off the cuff" adventure for them sprinkled in there.  Ultimately, they got to the end of our "Episode I" by joining the Rebellion.

 

As far as specific encounters, all I can say is just start creating your own set pieces.  There is a great podcast called "The Order 66" and in episode 11, GM's Holocron 2.0, they do a great job of walking your through how to create them.  I wouldn't worry too much about how quick your players fly through your baddies and encounters because it just let's you know where you can make it harder and more challenging for next time.  I suggest getting the three packs of the adversary cards (Scum and Villany, Citizens of the Galaxy, and Imperial and Rebels) because they are SUCH an easy resource to pull out for that "on the fly" encounter you need.  I wish they would make decks for vehicles/starships.  (Hint, Hint, FFG!!! =)

 

Anyways, I'll end it here and good luck!

 

Z

 

 

so, there are several new GMs in our group (for my birthday we are breaking out a bunch of the modules and having everyone run one in a "round robin")  One of the things I am doing to help them out is making a set of "cards" that have the stats for several baddies the group is likely to come across.  For example, storm troopers, pirates, hired guns/mercs, a few bounty hunters, etc.  I am making them varying difficulties so that if the GM feels things are moving to smoothly, or wants to shake things up, they have that option at their fingertips instead of having to chase down stats for a specific baddie.

 

This also helps when players take a game "off the rails" (which happens often to all of us).  If, for example, the group wants to go to the local junk shop and threaten the owner into paying them a "protection fee", maybe the junkyard dealer is already 'protected' by the local thugs, or maybe there just happens to be a squad of stormtroopers that rush over when they hear the scuffle.

 

Just a thought.

 

Most of the games we run are a mixture of homebrew and modules, and what I try to do is write out a longer plotline that ties it all together.  I try and have an end goal, like defeating the escaped sith master, or overthrowing the imperial presence on a specific planet.  With that main goal, I can then insert facts, baddies, hints, and encounters that push toward that goal.  It doesn't mean that every session needs to be pointed in that direction, but maybe they find a clue, or a piece of equipment that help them in that goal.

 

For example, my main goal for this part of the campaign is pushing the imperial presence off of Titus (just a name out of a hat).  So, I already know I will want the group working 'with' the rebellion, even if they aren't a part of the rebellion.  So as they are making their way, doing missions to scratch out a place among the stars, they are also gaining resources (maybe some fighters) maybe political of financial pull for the rebellion with the local leaders.  The players all know that they want Titus to be free of imperial control, so they are also looking for things to do to further that goal.  Maybe its sneaking in to one of the three orbital platforms and grabbing a special ship (ala "shell game"), or maybe it is breaking into a base on the surface and getting its communication station (like the AoR box set), these still work if your group isn't straight rebellion, and can be great pieces to pull things together as a team.  You can even pull from jewel of yavin or beyond the rim for ideas and resources.

 

Just a thought.  Good luck!

 

--trial

Thanks for those tips. I was already thinking that I was going to incorporate one of the beginner sets into my campaign to allow the players that haven't played yet get the hang of things but throw in some extras like maybe starting it off at point before the box set has it to give it a new feel to some of the players that have been with me for awhile and have already played them. I'm thinking of using the AoR beginner game then going to operation shadow point where they eventually either lose the base or successfully hold it. This is where my homebrew starts and because of their success in infiltrating and taking over they are charged with creating a foot hold in the mid-rim taking a base that will act as a staging point for other missions in the system. At the base they will be meting the main antagonist of the campaign and will be meeting him on almost every major mission they are sent on. Either of you have any input on this or do you think this will work? Another question is how do you run space combat?

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I think what you've got planned will most definitely work.

 

As far as running space combat, I can't really go over it in this e-mail.  But, I would listen to Episode 25 of The Order 66 podcast (starting around 47:30) because it goes into how to run space combat and they even run a quick one at the end of the podcast.  I love these guys and they really break it down very well.  Granted, it's long ... almost 2.5 hours long.  I will tell you though, you'll understand space combat VERY well after listening.  =)

 

Enjoy!

 

Z

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I think what you've got planned will most definitely work.

 

As far as running space combat, I can't really go over it in this e-mail.  But, I would listen to Episode 25 of The Order 66 podcast (starting around 47:30) because it goes into how to run space combat and they even run a quick one at the end of the podcast.  I love these guys and they really break it down very well.  Granted, it's long ... almost 2.5 hours long.  I will tell you though, you'll understand space combat VERY well after listening.  =)

 

Enjoy!

 

Z

Thanks for your input Z, i have already listened to episode 11 as you suggested for creating campaigns and i thought it was amazing. I learned a lot from just that one podcast so i will definitely be listening to episode 25. Lol i am surprised that you know down to the minute of when they start talking about the content needed haha. Again thanks you have been a real help. If i think of anything else that i need some advice on ill throw it your way but i have some work to do.  

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LOL!  Yeah, I just listened to Episode 25 last week and realized I've been doing space combat wrong. Not taking into consideration the speeds of the ships, adding "terrain/obstacles", movement ranges, fly/drive manuever, understanding the awesomeness that is gain the advantage, etc.

 

I actually found the minute when the "meat" of the podcast started while I was responding to your post to make it easier for ya.  =)

 

Those guys at The Order 66 really know there stuff and are pretty fun to listen to as well.  If you look on their podcast feed list, they've some pretty good descriptions of what they go through in the episode if you're interested as well.

 

Glad to help out and take care!

 

Z

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I've always been the GM for my group of friends and like trial was saying, I like to have sort of a broader goal for my players in mind. Right now that broader goal for my players is to do a grand heist of an Imperial prototype from the Kuat Drive Yards. Now they can't just roll up to the Kuat Drive Yards, they've had to do a lot of other stuff to track down things like allies, supplies, and materials. For something like that you could always ask your players what things they might want to track down and then come up with the adventure based on what they're trying to get their hands on. Or if you're proactive you could think of things that the players might want and have NPCs nudge them in that direction. Regardless, I always ask my players to come up with their next move at the end of a session so even if they're going completely off the rails I can come to the next session more or less prepared. :)

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