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There just seems to me to be a missing mechanic for late or early changing of profession. Not say it should be free maybe 50xp or more but that there should be one.

That’s not the way FFG wrote their Star Wars Roleplaying Game.

In the FFG system, Han is and always will be a Smuggler. He can add skills from anywhere, he can add specializations from various other areas, but his core fundamental nature never changes.

That’s what they call a Career. It’s not necessarily what you get paid to do. In this game, your Career is the single most important factor that defines what kind of person you are.

I might have chosen different words than Career and Specialization, but I agree with the overall concept.

 

 

 

EDIT: Changed “Scoundrel” to “Smuggler”.  Thanks TalosX!

Edited by bradknowles

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Well to put it in a more "In Game Way" during one of my games I played in there was a character thats over all goal was to become a a Jedi but because it was set in the Galactic Civil War Era the GM ruled that he had to start as a ETE or AOR career since he had no Master to teach him. this meant that he cant get any of the Jedi Signature Ability and will pay more for any new Jedi Specialization that he picks up thru out the game. Just seems harsh that the mechanics punish him for his GMs Chose. 

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There just seems to me to be a missing mechanic for late or early changing of profession. Not say it should be free maybe 50xp or more but that there should be one.

That’s not the way FFG wrote their Star Wars Roleplaying Game.

In the FFG system, Han is and always will be a Scoundrel. He can add skills from anywhere, he can add specializations from various other areas, but his core fundamental nature never changes.

That’s what they call a Career. It’s not necessarily what you get paid to do. In this game, your Career is the single most important factor that defines what kind of person you are.

I might have chosen different words than Career and Specialization, but I agree with the overall concept.

 

 

I think you meant Han is and always will be a Smuggler, but I agree.  Han can and does learn a lot of different skills throughout his life.  However, at the end of the day he is a Smuggler at heart.

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Well to put it in a more "In Game Way" during one of my games I played in there was a character thats over all goal was to become a a Jedi but because it was set in the Galactic Civil War Era the GM ruled that he had to start as a ETE or AOR career since he had no Master to teach him. this meant that he cant get any of the Jedi Signature Ability and will pay more for any new Jedi Specialization that he picks up thru out the game. Just seems harsh that the mechanics punish him for his GMs Chose. 

 

Well that's more the GMs decision then a failing of the systems mechanics.  The additional Specialization cost (10 XP) is equal to the first point in an out of career skill, and for that extra cost you get access to new career skills, force powers, and a new talent tree... seems like a hell of a bargain in comparison.  Almost everyone takes out of career specializations eventually.  As for the Signature Abilities, talk with your GM.  Explain your characters theme, and maybe he'd be willing to let you use Signature Abilities from a specific FaD Career, instead of your actual Career.  As a GM, I find that I'm usually willing to work with players as long as they're willing to sit down and have a reasonable conversation about what they'd like to do with their characters.

 

I'm running a game currently using the same premise, EotE and AoR careers only, no FaD careers.  My players seem to enjoy it because now there's actually a story to how they became force sensitive.

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I agree with TalosX on this point: the issue is with the GM imposing the rule on creation, not with the system itself.

 

And I'm not sure the issue with the GM is really a problem.  It's his game, he can run it how he wants.  In an EotE/AoR game, I think it's fairly reasonable to disallow FaD careers at creation, but the RAW very clearly allow players to still become force-sensitive regardless.  The path is still there, and it provides one way to mechanically represent what Luke did (tho Leia may be a better example, assuming she does *something* with her force sensitivity in the new films, I haven't seen TFA yet, so please no spoilers).  Again, TalosX touched on this above.

 

Unfortunately the RAW would disallow such a character from learning Jedi/force career signature abilities.  This could be easily rectified with house rules, like:

  • Characters fitting the above description may take one signature ability from a force-sensitive career they took a spec in.
  • Allow a character a full respec to represent the massive change in their life path.

But again, these solutions need to be implemented on the GM's end.

 

To sum up: It's the GM's game, so what he says, goes.  He may or may not understand the mechanics or the consequences of his restrictions + RAW.  If there's a problem, you should take it up with him.

 

P.S. With the exception of signature abilities, there's little reason to change careers.  Your 50 xp example would be the cost penalty for 5 out-of-career specializations, which would just be redonkulous.  You'd have to take almost all of the specializations in a single career (including the ones in splat books) to even get equity on that investment.  The exception is, of course, the signature abilities, but IMO that expense still wouldn't be worth it.  YMMV.

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Well to put it in a more "In Game Way" during one of my games I played in there was a character thats over all goal was to become a a Jedi but because it was set in the Galactic Civil War Era the GM ruled that he had to start as a ETE or AOR career since he had no Master to teach him. this meant that he cant get any of the Jedi Signature Ability and will pay more for any new Jedi Specialization that he picks up thru out the game. Just seems harsh that the mechanics punish him for his GMs Chose. 

 

This is really a GM issue, not a missing mechanic issue as you alluded to earlier. In this case the player would need to sit down with the GM and talk out the character concept and how it will work mechanically. If Jedi signature abilities are really important to the player then it would be fair to ask the GM if he can start in a F&D career and just not take any Force Powers until he finds a teacher. This gives him a Force Rating of 1 and a path to being a Jedi, but not until he finds a teacher. But this is really a GM issue and has nothing to do with how the game was designed and set up. In such a situation I would like to think that a GM and a player can find some kind of compromise between mechanics and concept. 

 

Not gonna lie, if I was set on a Jedi signature ability such a path would suck. But I don't really believe that the game mechanics should be corrected because of how a GM decides to allow things. 

 

However the mechanics are not punishing the player here. The Jedi player is paying the same cost that anyone else would have to pay if they wanted to add to their repertoire. The player is also getting more for that extra cost than most other players. So in the end he makes out better anyway. But in no way are the mechanics punishing the player. Sometimes a player ends up paying more because of how his GM wants to play it, but that is entirely on the GM and not the system.

 

This is 100% a GM/player issue. I recommend asking the GM for a compromise, pointing out that maybe the player would like to be able to take Jedi signature abilities so is it possible to start in a Jedi career and just not take any Force based stuff until the character finds a teacher.   

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Luke starts out as a Explorer / Fringer. His mind was always somewhere else, craving adventure. Also, he wouldn't care about paying for the Force Emergent spec because blowing up the Death Star probably gave him infinity experience anyway, his GM is only slowing down his progression by limiting how much he can train per session.

 

Then it's an even-bet as to whether he focuses his XP into buffing up his Force Powers or if he buys Starfighter Ace at all. Since he has to learn to wield a lightsaber too and focus a lot on Athletics and Discipline. Could be that since he's already a good pilot with good Agility and Brawn he decides to fill out his Emergent spec tree and Force Powers first. It's only after ESB that he goes back and specs into a Guardian specialization, maybe.

 

Now, is that correct according to FFG's system? Is Luke forever an Explorer at heart? I think so. The need for adventure probably leaves him later on, but I think that's at the core of Luke's character. It even fits with Episode 7's story. 

 

 

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Luke starts out as a Explorer / Fringer. His mind was always somewhere else, craving adventure. Also, he wouldn't care about paying for the Force Emergent spec because blowing up the Death Star probably gave him infinity experience anyway, his GM is only slowing down his progression by limiting how much he can train per session.

 

Then it's an even-bet as to whether he focuses his XP into buffing up his Force Powers or if he buys Starfighter Ace at all. Since he has to learn to wield a lightsaber too and focus a lot on Athletics and Discipline. Could be that since he's already a good pilot with good Agility and Brawn he decides to fill out his Emergent spec tree and Force Powers first. It's only after ESB that he goes back and specs into a Guardian specialization, maybe.

 

Now, is that correct according to FFG's system? Is Luke forever an Explorer at heart? I think so. The need for adventure probably leaves him later on, but I think that's at the core of Luke's character. It even fits with Episode 7's story. 

 

I was reading through this thread and putting this argument together, but I got to the end and you had already done it.  Explorer: Driver or Fringer followed by Force-Sensitive Emergent, and then either Starfighter Ace, Shii-Cho Knight, or maybe either Peacekeeper or the new Warleader spec (depends on the details, which I haven't seen yet).  The EU pretty consistently implies that despite all he's been through, Luke is still "a farmboy at heart", and beyond the big fight scenes most of what he does could be considered "sidekick" stuff.

 

That said, I firmly believe that the rules can and should be flexible to accomodate the story.  If you were to run a mega-campaign on the scale of the original trilogy, it might make sense to allow players to re-create their characters when thematically appropriate.  For shorter stories, use whatever best reflects the aspects of Star Wars you're trying to portray (and the rules you have at hand): in a The Empire Strikes Back adventure, I'd probably do Luke as Commander: Tactician with Force-Sensitive Emergent, whereas in Return of the Jedi a F&D Career and Specialization would be far more appropriate (likely Guardian: Peacekeeper or Warrior: Shii-Cho Knight).

Edited by Joker Two

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So Luke will always be overcharged* as a Jedi because he did not know the Jedi existed before he met Ben, just doesn't feel right to me

 

* compared to some one who starts as a Jedi and does not have to pay the out of career penalty. 

He was always overcharged when learning the jedi path. He was already too old, and Yoda made that pretty clear. He worked pretty hard to get into shape later on, outside his innate use of the force.

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I am starting a big AoR campaign in January and I allow FaD careers. The only thing I don't allow are: Starting Force Powers and Lightsaber Specializations. The characters are allowed to be represented as "talented but untrained" force users, and use the force only intuitively, through their force talents. I also don't allow the in-game training of Force powers or lightsaber specs by themselves except when they become aware, that their "luck" is actually the force.

But I allow the untrained use of a lightsaber with your Brawn. That's because of Ep VII.

They may find a teacher who can teach them some way of the force, and I am not exclusively thinking of the Jedi.

 

When one of my players chooses one of those Non-Lightsaber specs he may integrate his character in one of the two starting structures of either the passikian underground movement or the rebel alliance, who will work together to create a proper alliance cell in the Passik sector.

 

A Warrior Starfighter Ace might be a gifted rebel pilot for example, while a Guardian Peacekeeper could be a rebel officer and a Sentinel Artisan might be a local workshop owner.

 

Don't really look at the name of the career per se, but interpret it like YOU want.

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So Luke will always be overcharged* as a Jedi because he did not know the Jedi existed before he met Ben, just doesn't feel right to me

 

* compared to some one who starts as a Jedi and does not have to pay the out of career penalty. 

Technically there are no Jedi in the game. There are Force careers which can be used to create Jedi. Luke's player does not get penalized. Unlike players who create their character for other eras, Luke's player created his character during an era when Force using was at an all time low. Thus starting as an Explorer/Fringer or an Ace/Pilot with FSEx or FSEm before heading into specs from F&D like Starfighter Ace or Shii-Cho Knight. As already stated you should choose your Career wisely (perhaps choose one from F&D initially) or have a lenient GM (that allows for a respec or that may allow you to take another career signature ablility) if this is such a big deal to you. No need for a mechanic to switch careers.

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So Luke will always be overcharged* as a Jedi because he did not know the Jedi existed before he met Ben, just doesn't feel right to me

 

* compared to some one who starts as a Jedi and does not have to pay the out of career penalty. 

Technically there are no Jedi in the game. There are Force careers which can be used to create Jedi. Luke's player does not get penalized. Unlike players who create their character for other eras, Luke's player created his character during an era when Force using was at an all time low. Thus starting as an Explorer/Fringer or an Ace/Pilot with FSEx or FSEm before heading into specs from F&D like Starfighter Ace or Shii-Cho Knight. As already stated you should choose your Career wisely (perhaps choose one from F&D initially) or have a lenient GM (that allows for a respec or that may allow you to take another career signature ablility) if this is such a big deal to you. No need for a mechanic to switch careers.

 

I've wondered about this for a while, but a lot of people have been suggesting Luke is a Shii-Cho user.  While Obi-Won did teach him the basics of Shii-Cho, he later learned Shien.  He used Shien on Endor as well when he was deflecting blasts back at their originators.  According to the EU/Legends, he was primarily a Shien user.  He was known to be a true master of Shien by the time he declared himself Grandmaster of the NJO.  Now obviously the new movie is going to involve a lot of retcon.  However, we don't honestly know anything about Luke's capabilities in the new series to make a guess as to his style.

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You go to your GM and say really nicely.  Hey this new book comes out and it really fits my character better, do you mind if I respec into one of the careers that are in it.  Then you give him/her a cookie.

 

And if the cookie doesn't work?  Maybe try a six-pack.

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That’s not the way FFG wrote their Star Wars Roleplaying Game.

In the FFG system, Han is and always will be a Smuggler. He can add skills from anywhere, he can add specializations from various other areas, but his core fundamental nature never changes.

That’s what they call a Career. It’s not necessarily what you get paid to do. In this game, your Career is the single most important factor that defines what kind of person you are.

 

That's pretty much the summation that I'd have gone with, however, this does, naturally, lead to the question of what to do about characters that take Obi-wan's advice, and go home and rethink their life.

 

If I'm playing the scummy spice pusher from the Nar Shaddaa underworld, and after falling in with the adventuring party, the orphaned padawan inspires me to leave my life of crime and, say, use my knowledge of chemicals and their effect on the body to become a doctor, and over years of education and experience, I become really good at it, all the while my skills with a blaster, and as a swindler are declining...eventually, I'll reach a point where "the single most important factor that defines what kind of person" my PC is will have changed from "spice dealer" to "doctor".  At that point, by the explanation given, I should be able to re-stat as a Colonist (Doctor), even though the rules don't provide for that occurrence.

 

I think the simple answer is that the FFG system had to draw a line for simplicity's sake somewhere, and characters whose lives go through a major transformation are just one area that falls outside that line.  I think that this is something where a GM and player just need to use common sense.  When your character gets to the point that they've changed to much that they're just not what they once were in any way, you need to make a change.  I'd personally probably make it as simple as, "Okay, you're now a Colonist, with specs in Doctor and Scoundrel.  Any advancement in Scoundrel will now cost more, but further advancement in Doctor is at the normal rate."  The tipping point would be when XP invested in the new spec exceeded XP spent while part of the old one (whether on skills or whatever).

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That’s not the way FFG wrote their Star Wars Roleplaying Game.

In the FFG system, Han is and always will be a Smuggler. He can add skills from anywhere, he can add specializations from various other areas, but his core fundamental nature never changes.

That’s what they call a Career. It’s not necessarily what you get paid to do. In this game, your Career is the single most important factor that defines what kind of person you are.

 

That's pretty much the summation that I'd have gone with, however, this does, naturally, lead to the question of what to do about characters that take Obi-wan's advice, and go home and rethink their life.

 

If I'm playing the scummy spice pusher from the Nar Shaddaa underworld, and after falling in with the adventuring party, the orphaned padawan inspires me to leave my life of crime and, say, use my knowledge of chemicals and their effect on the body to become a doctor, and over years of education and experience, I become really good at it, all the while my skills with a blaster, and as a swindler are declining...eventually, I'll reach a point where "the single most important factor that defines what kind of person" my PC is will have changed from "spice dealer" to "doctor".  At that point, by the explanation given, I should be able to re-stat as a Colonist (Doctor), even though the rules don't provide for that occurrence.

 

I think the simple answer is that the FFG system had to draw a line for simplicity's sake somewhere, and characters whose lives go through a major transformation are just one area that falls outside that line.  I think that this is something where a GM and player just need to use common sense.  When your character gets to the point that they've changed to much that they're just not what they once were in any way, you need to make a change.  I'd personally probably make it as simple as, "Okay, you're now a Colonist, with specs in Doctor and Scoundrel.  Any advancement in Scoundrel will now cost more, but further advancement in Doctor is at the normal rate."  The tipping point would be when XP invested in the new spec exceeded XP spent while part of the old one (whether on skills or whatever).

 

 

Spice dealer isn't who you are. It's not the central core of your being. Moving from being a spice dealer to a doctor isn't changing who you are, it's changing what you do. 

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That’s not the way FFG wrote their Star Wars Roleplaying Game.

In the FFG system, Han is and always will be a Smuggler. He can add skills from anywhere, he can add specializations from various other areas, but his core fundamental nature never changes.

That’s what they call a Career. It’s not necessarily what you get paid to do. In this game, your Career is the single most important factor that defines what kind of person you are.

 

That's pretty much the summation that I'd have gone with, however, this does, naturally, lead to the question of what to do about characters that take Obi-wan's advice, and go home and rethink their life.

 

If I'm playing the scummy spice pusher from the Nar Shaddaa underworld, and after falling in with the adventuring party, the orphaned padawan inspires me to leave my life of crime and, say, use my knowledge of chemicals and their effect on the body to become a doctor, and over years of education and experience, I become really good at it, all the while my skills with a blaster, and as a swindler are declining...eventually, I'll reach a point where "the single most important factor that defines what kind of person" my PC is will have changed from "spice dealer" to "doctor".  At that point, by the explanation given, I should be able to re-stat as a Colonist (Doctor), even though the rules don't provide for that occurrence.

 

I think the simple answer is that the FFG system had to draw a line for simplicity's sake somewhere, and characters whose lives go through a major transformation are just one area that falls outside that line.  I think that this is something where a GM and player just need to use common sense.  When your character gets to the point that they've changed to much that they're just not what they once were in any way, you need to make a change.  I'd personally probably make it as simple as, "Okay, you're now a Colonist, with specs in Doctor and Scoundrel.  Any advancement in Scoundrel will now cost more, but further advancement in Doctor is at the normal rate."  The tipping point would be when XP invested in the new spec exceeded XP spent while part of the old one (whether on skills or whatever).

 

 

Spice dealer isn't who you are. It's not the central core of your being. Moving from being a spice dealer to a doctor isn't changing who you are, it's changing what you do. 

 

O...kay?

 

So changing a career reflects a change of what you do then.  Whatever you want to call it.  You're making a distinction based on semantics, for something that isn't even the central point of the discussion.

 

So in my example, Spice Dealer is what that PC did.  Until they didn't.  Now they do something else.

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O...kay?

 

 

So changing a career reflects a change of what you do then.  Whatever you want to call it.  You're making a distinction based on semantics, for something that isn't even the central point of the discussion.

 

So in my example, Spice Dealer is what that PC did.  Until they didn't.  Now they do something else.

 

 

No changing specializations reflects changing what you do. The portion you quoted from though was mentioning how careers aren't so much what you do, but who you are. So lets take Han as an example (as the original person did), Han at heart is a smuggler. He does other things in life. He becomes a general, for instance, He's a resistance fighter in the Rebel Alliance (and the Resistance in TFA). But at his core he's a smuggler. 

 

To some extent, as mentioned by someone else in this thread, career may have been a bad name as it makes people think that it's something you do. But the way the mechanic seems to work is that career represents who you fundamentally are. Are you fundamentally a Smuggler or a Colonist? Being a spice dealer and being a doctor is just something you do. It's a job. Switching from spice dealer to doctor is already covered by changing specializations. But that change doesn't mean that you stop fundamentally being a Smuggler and are now a Colonist. 

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The problem with this line of thinking is that you are amusing that Smuggler is his life calling.

As I have said before I've spent the last 20 some years in customer service due to nothing more then a need for money.

And not too put to fine of a point on it I hated it.

That's why I'm Back in School studying to get my AAS of Computer Information Technology.

Does this mean my calling is Customer Service for the rest of my life. NO.

All this means is this is what I Had to do to survive.

To put this in a game point of view lets say the PC (Going to stop using know Characters to avoid stepping on toes) is on a outer rim planet.

He is a Trader because that's what his family does. He hates trading but has not found his place in the universe yet.

Later he runs across a Jedi in Exile who tells him he is force sensitive.

He learns the ways of the Force and finds that this is what he was meant to be.

now by the Star Wars RPG he is a Explorer/ Trader or Fringer with the Force Sensitive-Emergent tree.

And as his teacher continues to train him he learns the Peacekeeper/Soresu Defender trees.

at this point he has more xp spent in the Guardian Career then Explorer but by the RAW his is a Explorer and will always be an Explorer. 

 

Now i understand the chose made here by FFG, its a game balance thing, and there's no deeper meaning to it like poster here want to give it. Its not about Callings or what a PC is at heart its about keeping the Power-Gaming down. Now where I agree this needs to be done to have a fun game for all i still think there should be a mechanic to allow for the switch of Careers when the PC and GM agree that it would be appropriate.

Edited by tenchi2a

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The problem with this line of thinking is that you are amusing that Smuggler is his life calling.

As I have said before I've spent the last 20 some years in customer service due to nothing more then a need for money.

And not too put to fine of a point on it I hated it.

That's why I'm Back in School studying to get my AAS of Computer Information Technology.

Does this mean my calling is Customer Service for the rest of my life. NO.

All this means is this is what I Had to do to survive.

To put this in a game point of view lets say the PC (Going to stop using know Characters to avoid stepping on toes) is on a outer rim planet.

He is a Trader because that's what his family does. He hates trading but has not found his place in the universe yet.

Later he runs across a Jedi in Exile who tells him he is force sensitive.

He learns the ways of the Force and finds that this is what he was meant to be.

now by the Star Wars RPG he is a Explorer/ Trader or Fringer with the Force Sensitive-Emergent tree.

And as his teacher continues to train him he learns the Peacekeeper/Soresu Defender trees.

at this point he has more xp spent in the Guardian Career then Explorer but by the RAW his is a Explorer and will always be an Explorer. 

 

Now i understand the chose made here by FFG, its a game balance thing, and there's no deeper meaning to it like poster here want to give it. Its not about Callings or what a PC is at heart its about keeping the Power-Gaming down. Now where I agree this needs to be done to have a fun game for all i still think there should be a mechanic to allow for the switch of Careers when the PC and GM agree that it would be appropriate.

 

Your Career is in "Technical Services".  You have a specialization in Customer Service, and you're now paying the XP to switch over and focus on Computer IT as a new specialization.  Your Career however is still Technical Services.  Just one way to look at it.

 

While you might disagree, Customer Service and Computer IT are likely specializations.  Do not mistake a real world equivalent career, for a Star Wars Career.  They have very different meanings.  I won't debate whether you are changing your Career (big C) in my little scenario.  I'm merely pointing out that Customer Service and Computer IT would be specializations (or more likely, simply jobs), and aren't really relevant to the current debate.

Edited by TalosX

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I personally feel the "Difference" in cost, stated by the OP, is overstated.

 

Any extra spec you take is really only costing what? An Extra 10Exp.

 

Which, if you go the other direction, Say I started as a smuggler and wanted to become a doctor.... Or had started as a dcotor but picked up some smuggler spec trees ... either way you paid the extra. 

 

Also after a number of Various Specs have been taken, you eventually have quite a range of "Career skills"

 

And even if you did develop some of those skills as Non-Career before picking up the spec to make them career skills The extra cost was Only 5 exp. 

 

It doesn't matter how high you develop the skill, the extra cost was still Only 5 experince over a Career skill. 

 

So what I am saying here, is that in the end, when you have a 500-600 experience character.... you really haven't spent all that much extra if you became a doctor and started your career as a smuggler.  You a smuggler with Good Doctor skills and talents. And your not really worse off than the guy whos atrted career as a Doctor and picked up some smuggler Skills and talents later. Its really a wash. 

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The problem with this line of thinking is that you are amusing that Smuggler is his life calling.

As I have said before I've spent the last 20 some years in customer service due to nothing more then a need for money.

And not too put to fine of a point on it I hated it.

That's why I'm Back in School studying to get my AAS of Computer Information Technology.

Does this mean my calling is Customer Service for the rest of my life. NO.

All this means is this is what I Had to do to survive.

To put this in a game point of view lets say the PC (Going to stop using know Characters to avoid stepping on toes) is on a outer rim planet.

He is a Trader because that's what his family does. He hates trading but has not found his place in the universe yet.

Later he runs across a Jedi in Exile who tells him he is force sensitive.

He learns the ways of the Force and finds that this is what he was meant to be.

now by the Star Wars RPG he is a Explorer/ Trader or Fringer with the Force Sensitive-Emergent tree.

And as his teacher continues to train him he learns the Peacekeeper/Soresu Defender trees.

at this point he has more xp spent in the Guardian Career then Explorer but by the RAW his is a Explorer and will always be an Explorer. 

 

Now i understand the chose made here by FFG, its a game balance thing, and there's no deeper meaning to it like poster here want to give it. Its not about Callings or what a PC is at heart its about keeping the Power-Gaming down. Now where I agree this needs to be done to have a fun game for all i still think there should be a mechanic to allow for the switch of Careers when the PC and GM agree that it would be appropriate.

 

Your Career is in "Technical Services".  You have a specialization in Customer Service, and you're now paying the XP to switch over and focus on Computer IT as a new specialization.  Your Career however is still Technical Services.  Just one way to look at it.

 

While you might disagree, Customer Service and Computer IT are likely specializations.  Do not mistake a real world equivalent career, for a Star Wars Career.  They have very different meanings.  I won't debate whether you are changing your Career (big C) in my little scenario.  I'm merely pointing out that Customer Service and Computer IT would be specializations (or more likely, simply jobs), and aren't really relevant to the current debate.

 

My Customer Service is in Sales and Management Not tech so this argument falls apart.

but the overall theme is FFG is God I'm wrong got it.

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No, you need to realize what proffessions on EotE means. They are not only a job (like your customer service), it is also their passion and way of life. Following your analogy as a EotE example a physicist doesn't stop being a physicist because he has to spend some time frying burguers to be able to pay the bills.

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No where in the Books does it say that the Career are anything more then a career.

there is no mention of them being your passion just the job you do amount the other PCs.

again I was asking if there was a way in the game to change Careers not what they mean to everybody.

But again it seems if i have a different opinion of what they are I get told I'm wrong and get attack.

So I'm done with this Thread till a open discuss can be had without all answers being you wrong.

Edited by tenchi2a

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