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Ravncat

If you can fly it well.

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Pretty sure that what a lot of people mean by "if you can fly it well" is "don't roll blanks." There are certainly lists out there that have a higher skill floor required to be effective, but too often that kind of phrasing is used as a crutch to justify why some demonstrably underpowered ship or list is okay. "Just fly it better!" etc.

One of the things that I think actually constitutes flying well is being able to force your opponent to split fire between multiple targets more than they force you to do the same, or to take shots that aren't really in their best interest (trying to punch through a tanked up Soontir doesn't make sense if there's only one ship shooting at him this turn, etc.).

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As a pilot who specializes in the flying circus, knowing when to go for the kill and when to break off. Sometimes discretion is the better part of valor, even if the other guy only has Z-95's, a blocked Soontir is a dead Soontir.

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Excellent idea for a thread - I know I fall prey to some of these, particularly not planning more than one turn ahead.

 

There are some lists that just require a greater degree of skill and familiarity with the game than others.  Triple Interceptors, while without doubt a solid list, is not a forgiving thing to fly in any way, so player manoeuvring skill becomes notably more important than it would with more durable ships.  If you fail to dodge an arc with an Interceptor, it's not going to go well for you...

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Flying poorly: maneuvering to get to where your opponent _is_ rather than where they _will_ be.

Flying well is the opposite of that.

When I'm flying well, I see the board from my opponent's perspective first, see the range of options available to them, and then plan my moves to take advantage of those options. When I lose it's because I never thought about my opponent and just flew my own ships.

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I think playing with the strengths/weaknesses of your pilots in mind is important (joust with an arc dodger or pwt? No! Split up your low PS ships to chase multiple individual arc dodgers? No! Plus all of the initial post fundamentals like avoiding asteroids, maximising actions etc etc etc....


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I liken flying well to what is meant by "shape" in pool/billiards.  In pool, you strike the cue ball to make a shot - if you're mindful of "shape" - you think about your next shot before you take the shot at hand; reasoning where you would like the cue ball to end up afte the shot is taken (so that it is hopefully lined up for the follow-up shot). 

 

IN order to develop good shape in pool, you have to have a good understanding of where the cue ball needs to go after you've taken your shot, and you need to have the skill to get it there.

 

Flying well, means (or so I have understood it) that you know where your ship should be after you move (position, heading, distance, etc) and you have the skill to get it there.  It also means that you have some facility anticipating where you opponent's ships will be, so that you can line up your shot as effectively (both from an offensive and defensive stand point) as possible.

 

People who fly well, can do more with less  because they are able to manufacture opportunities to strike from safer vantages - compensating for lower stats with better "shape".

 

If that makes any sense.

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I liken flying well to what is meant by "shape" in pool/billiards.  In pool, you strike the cue ball to make a shot - if you're mindful of "shape" - you think about your next shot before you take the shot at hand; reasoning where you would like the cue ball to end up afte the shot is taken (so that it is hopefully lined up for the follow-up shot). 

 

IN order to develop good shape in pool, you have to have a good understanding of where the cue ball needs to go after you've taken your shot, and you need to have the skill to get it there.

 

Flying well, means (or so I have understood it) that you know where your ship should be after you move (position, heading, distance, etc) and you have the skill to get it there.  It also means that you have some facility anticipating where you opponent's ships will be, so that you can line up your shot as effectively (both from an offensive and defensive stand point) as possible.

 

People who fly well, can do more with less  because they are able to manufacture opportunities to strike from safer vantages - compensating for lower stats with better "shape".

 

If that makes any sense.

Hmm that's a really good analogy. I'm actually a really good pool player, too. Always want to think at least one shot ahead.

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excellent post

 

I've always thought that "Flying well" is a very vague advice and sometimes also misused

 

Not that I completely disagree with all the comments above, but "Flying well" for me is a more basic term which refers to know your own ships maneuverability, if we set up a board with obstacles, most likely the path used by two different ships to go from point A to point B, should be also different in a way that is efficient for each one; then above that is Synergy handling, which means you use the pilot/ships abilities and upgrades on the right moment and then on top of those two you'll get the skill to predict your opponents maneuvers.

 

This is the beauty of X-Wing, it is simple but has deep game mechanics that goes above winning with list building or just plain dice luck (sssshhh, :ph34r: don't tell my dice I said that or they might get angry :P )

Edited by RodTheCid

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If someone says, 'It's good, you just have to fly it well", they mean one of two things:

1.) It's a bad list. In other words, it's not a dumb fat turret or Soontir.

2.) They're a new player that thinks that things like a Super Phantom take skill because they constantly fly them onto asteroids. Same can be said for other easymode ships.

Lists that /actually/ 'Are good, you just need to fly well' lists are like 5x Autothruster Alpha. They benefit from specific flying skills that one can point to. The definition of, 'You just need to fly 5x Autothruster Alpha well' is making sure the initial engagement is range 3 so you take no damage with AT, and then closing to range 1 to kill things with 4 attack dice.

Flying a Biggs based list well means that he's always at range 3 and isn't always targetable so that way he's not just focused down immediately anyways.

If your opponent can't define exactly what they mean by, "It's good, you just have to fly it well" they have a suboptimal list. If they say, "It's good, you just have to fly it well" and their definition of flying well is simply not landing your Phantom on an asteroid, they're playing an easymode list that doesn't need to be flown well.

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Flying poorly: maneuvering to get to where your opponent _is_ rather than where they _will_ be.

Flying well is the opposite of that.

When I'm flying well, I see the board from my opponent's perspective first, see the range of options available to them, and then plan my moves to take advantage of those options. When I lose it's because I never thought about my opponent and just flew my own ships.

 

^^ This.

 

For me, flying well is about predicting your opponents moves and counter moves, and also predicting when they will do something unexpected to try to not be predictable and then counter that too.

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"Flying it well" is the standard code for "bad" but blames the player rather than the ship itself.

See: TIE Defenders.

A poor workman blames his tools.

 

A good workman can tell when his tools are poor.

 

 

a good workman would probably be working instead of playing x-wing :P

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Pretty sure that what a lot of people mean by "if you can fly it well" is "don't roll blanks." There are certainly lists out there that have a higher skill floor required to be effective, but too often that kind of phrasing is used as a crutch to justify why some demonstrably underpowered ship or list is okay. "Just fly it better!" etc.

One of the things that I think actually constitutes flying well is being able to force your opponent to split fire between multiple targets more than they force you to do the same, or to take shots that aren't really in their best interest (trying to punch through a tanked up Soontir doesn't make sense if there's only one ship shooting at him this turn, etc.).

I don't think that people mean "Don't roll blanks" when they say something needs to be flown well, but that does remind me of something else that I see, especially with newer players.

 

Simply put, don't get too frustrated by singular variances in the dice. You're going to have games where either your dice fail to meet their expected results, or your opponent exceeds them.

 

Also, pay close attention to dice modifiers. Before complaining about how your dice were good or terrible, did you have focus tokens or target locks to aid you on those attacks? Were you spending most of the match stressed, and thus unable to take actions that would let you modify dice? I've had so many games where my opponents have complained that they had terrible dice, when what really happened was that they couldn't do anything with the eyeballs they kept rolling because they were stressed, or spent their action on a boost or barrel roll instead of focusing.

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"Flying it well" is the standard code for "bad" but blames the player rather than the ship itself.

See: TIE Defenders.

A poor workman blames his tools.

 

A good workman can tell when his tools are poor.

 

Poor tool's could never win a tournament.

 

Does the defender have issues yes the T-70 clearly shows how they messed up the cost but it's far from unusable.

 

It's not the prefix tie advanced or the generic e-wing. 

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