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FlightyBombJack

T-70 turbines?

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Noticed the details on the front of the split intake on the T-70, there are these things that look like, well, turbine blades.

https://cdn0.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/3616152/xwing_detail.0.jpg

 

In theory yeah a space ship could have air intake (or some other kind of intake) on their engine, especially if it was designed for atmospheric flight... but a problem that I am getting when I look at this is that it can't spin.  Spinning is kind of what a turbine does and you can't really rotate those turbine blades at all because they are in a semi-circle shaped housing.  So my question is, what do you think they are?

 

Right now my best guess is maybe they are physical shields that stop space junk from getting into the engine, but they are opened up in atmosphere for superior cooling?

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In a regular jet engine the front blades are the compressor blades and the blades that get rotated by the exhaust are the turbine blades. Your point is valid though in that these can't be compressor blades as they are only half of a supposedly rotating item - an impossibility.

 

I would hazard that they can combine to form a conventional jet engine when the wings are in a closed position. It isn't the first anomaly with Star Wars ships that looks odd but gets overlooked.

 

YT-1300%2B010.JPG

 

Every notice that the black exhaust fumes from the 3 ports on the top of the Falcon are angular and not straight back. If this ship was actually trailing plumes of smoke/exhaust, then the discolouration would be straight back.

Edited by Sergovan

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In a regular jet engine the front blades are the compressor blades and the blades that get rotated by the exhaust are the turbine blades. Your point is valid though in that these can't be compressor blades as they are only half of a supposedly rotating item - an impossibility.

 

I would hazard that they can combine to form a conventional jet engine when the wings are in a closed position. It isn't the first anomaly with Star Wars ships that looks odd but gets overlooked.

 

YT-1300%2B010.JPG

 

Every notice that the black exhaust fumes from the 3 ports on the top of the Falcon are angular and not straight back. If this ship was actually trailing plumes of smoke/exhaust, then the discolouration would be straight back.

We don't know what the engines on the falcon or any other ship actually do so its hard to speculate accurately about what's doing what or causing what. The streaks might radiate outward from the center of mass on the ship due to the antigravity effects or other weirdness that are associated with spacecraft in that Galaxy.

Or it looks cooler with the exhaust fanning out.

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Might just be a radiative surface. That's my mental explanation until lfl says otherwise.

This is my headcanon, too. They're fractal vanes designed to function as superefficient heat sinks for the ship's four power plants, and the resemblance to intake turbines on terrestrial jet engines is entirely coincidental.

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Might just be a radiative surface. That's my mental explanation until lfl says otherwise.

This is my headcanon, too. They're fractal vanes designed to function as superefficient heat sinks for the ship's four power plants, and the resemblance to intake turbines on terrestrial jet engines is entirely coincidental.

Under those engine nacelle domes on the Y-wings there may be similar vane structures, although most lore states the domes house sensors. Putting sensors on the engines is probably not the best idea.

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Might just be a radiative surface. That's my mental explanation until lfl says otherwise.

This is my headcanon, too. They're fractal vanes designed to function as superefficient heat sinks for the ship's four power plants, and the resemblance to intake turbines on terrestrial jet engines is entirely coincidental.

Under those engine nacelle domes on the Y-wings there may be similar vane structures, although most lore states the domes house sensors. Putting sensors on the engines is probably not the best idea.

Ampere's Law loses out to the Rule of Cool yet again...

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It's simply to answer question my friend  :)

 

 

Both - T-65s and T-70s have similar engine build.

As you can see on below blueprint, turbines are not located directly behind engine inlet. It starts in the middle of S-foil and it's overall size is smaller than the inlet itself. Please take your X-wing model and take a look at it (no matter the version) - both have the same design.

 

I hope I've helped.

 

a3a3291b3b56dac2.jpg

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Problem already solved with that image from the movie, I guess - they're simply not there on the fully canon model.

 

But for your headcanon, they could be stator vanes, designed to lead the air into the turbine in a certain way. Some real-life jet engines have these, and they don't spin.

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Noticed the details on the front of the split intake on the T-70, there are these things that look like, well, turbine blades.

https://cdn0.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/3616152/xwing_detail.0.jpg

 

In theory yeah a space ship could have air intake (or some other kind of intake) on their engine, especially if it was designed for atmospheric flight... but a problem that I am getting when I look at this is that it can't spin.  Spinning is kind of what a turbine does and you can't really rotate those turbine blades at all because they are in a semi-circle shaped housing.  So my question is, what do you think they are?

 

Right now my best guess is maybe they are physical shields that stop space junk from getting into the engine, but they are opened up in atmosphere for superior cooling?

 

I think the reason in-universe is the same as the reason out-of-universe; people expect a jet-like assemblage inside of the turbines, so the engineers built the grille/cover/intake vanes to look like a jet intake on purpose. Nowadays, hexagonal car grilles are popular because they look techy and modern; in SW with the starship being your average man's "car" fan-style radial grilles may be more popular aesthetically than purely functional mesh, or parallel slats because they harken back to "classic" jet engines.

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Every notice that the black exhaust fumes from the 3 ports on the top of the Falcon are angular and not straight back. If this ship was actually trailing plumes of smoke/exhaust, then the discolouration would be straight back.

 

It doesn't have to release its exhaust while in flight.  It may store the exhaust up until a specific point and then release it, probably after landing.

 

Noticed the details on the front of the split intake on the T-70, there are these things that look like, well, turbine blades.

https://cdn0.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/3616152/xwing_detail.0.jpg

 

In theory yeah a space ship could have air intake (or some other kind of intake) on their engine, especially if it was designed for atmospheric flight... but a problem that I am getting when I look at this is that it can't spin.  Spinning is kind of what a turbine does and you can't really rotate those turbine blades at all because they are in a semi-circle shaped housing.  So my question is, what do you think they are?

 

Right now my best guess is maybe they are physical shields that stop space junk from getting into the engine, but they are opened up in atmosphere for superior cooling?

 

Its a RAM jet / SCRAM jet.  In ALIENS / AvP / Predator / Prometheus the United Americas Colonial Marines UD4L Cheyenn uses turbofan propulsion that can be switched to RAM jet propulsion.  If they are leaving atmosphere or flying on planets that don't have the right gas mixtures for it to combust its fuel, the pilot will switch to SCRAM or Rocket propulsion.  Anyway RAM jets and SCRAM jets do not having moving parts in their internal components traditionally.

 

RoboTech Veritech fighters engines are similar in function as the UACM UD4L Cheyenn.  I wouldn't be surprised if the T-70 was similar in design.

 

Under those engine nacelle domes on the Y-wings there may be similar vane structures, although most lore states the domes house sensors. Putting sensors on the engines is probably not the best idea.

 

 

It depends how the sensors work, how the engines work, if the equipment is insulated to protect it from relative equipment and equipment being used on the craft its mounted on.  The good thing about those sensors, which isn't all the sensors the Y-Wing has, is that if the Y-Wing is attacked and damaged, odds are both sensors will not be taken out in one hit because they are far apart.

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even if the exhaust ports on the falcon vented when it wasn't in flight they would still be the same when they vented. unless each port had its on fan/blower that directed it in that peculiar direction. basically what happened is that the designers have no knowledge of how things really work and since its Star wars they can chalk it up to "PFM" and press on....

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even if the exhaust ports on the falcon vented when it wasn't in flight they would still be the same when they vented. unless each port had its on fan/blower that directed it in that peculiar direction. basically what happened is that the designers have no knowledge of how things really work and since its Star wars they can chalk it up to "PFM" and press on....

 

In the cut away book it appears the blowers are in the correct angle to make the marks we see. 

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Under those engine nacelle domes on the Y-wings there may be similar vane structures, although most lore states the domes house sensors. Putting sensors on the engines is probably not the best idea.

 

It depends how the sensors work, how the engines work, if the equipment is insulated to protect it from relative equipment and equipment being used on the craft its mounted on.  The good thing about those sensors, which isn't all the sensors the Y-Wing has, is that if the Y-Wing is attacked and damaged, odds are both sensors will not be taken out in one hit because they are far apart.

The sensors pretty much have to be electromagnetic. They use antennas, they require "windows" through the X-wing's nose cone, and they're processed by computers. And the engines supply electricity to the ship, which means they almost certainly create varying magnetic fields and therefore varying magnetic fields. That's going to show up on your sensors as a huge source of noise, if you bolt the sensor to the front of the engine.

You could shield the sensors, of course, but that's kind of counterproductive since it creates an enormous blind spots.

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