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Gadge

Goodbye to Battlefleet Gothic :(

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I'm keeping all my 40k armies.  I'll teach the kids 5th ed or 2nd ed when they're old enough.

 

Still got my AI fleets too - despite not getting them out of the box for at least 5 years.

 

When X Wing dies, I'll keep these too!

 

Logic - pah!

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Again i refer you to the 'logical' reivew of sales done for GW by an outside agency.

 

They found out black spray paint was the most cost effective to produce, sold the most and had high profit margins and therefore suggested GW focus on selling black spray paint... totally missing the reason said paint sells so well.But hey

 

 

'on paper'

 

it made perfect sense.

 

Kind makes me think of the toothpaste factories' problem with empty boxes.

 

"Understanding how important that was, the CEO of the toothpaste factory got the top people in the company together and they decided to start a new project, in which they would hire an external engineering company to solve their empty boxes problem, as their engineering department was already too stretched to take on any extra effort.

The project followed the usual process: budget and project sponsor allocated, RFP, third-parties selected, and six months (and $8 million) later they had a fantastic solution — on time, on budget, high quality and everyone in the project had a great time. They solved the problem by using some high-tech precision scales that would sound a bell and flash lights whenever a toothpaste box weighing less than it should. The line would stop, and someone had to walk over and yank the defective box out of it, pressing another button when done.

A while later, the CEO decides to have a look at the ROI of the project: amazing results! No empty boxes ever shipped out of the factory after the scales were put in place. Very few customer complaints, and they were gaining market share. “That’s some money well spent!” – he says, before looking closely at the other statistics in the report.

It turns out, the number of defects picked up by the scales was 0 after three weeks of production use. It should’ve been picking up at least a dozen a day, so maybe there was something wrong with the report. He filed a bug against it, and after some investigation, the engineers come back saying the report was actually correct. The scales really weren’t picking up any defects, because all boxes that got to that point in the conveyor belt were good.

Puzzled, the CEO travels down to the factory, and walks up to the part of the line where the precision scales were installed. A few feet before it, there was a $20 desk fan, blowing the empty boxes out of the belt and into a bin.

“Oh, that — one of the guys put it there ’cause he was tired of walking over every time the bell rang”, says one of the workers."

Edited by Sergovan

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That's as bad as NASA spending millions in the 60's trying to perfect a pen that would write in zero gravity. The Russians used a pencil.

 

And thus the Russians had to deal with the potentially lethal shavings going into the electronics...

 

 

 

Im pretty sure they used mechanical pencils.  they have been around since the 18th century

 

edit: yeah it was the 'kimek' model made in the Soviet Union for years

Edited by Gadge

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The point is that particular analogy has been debunked. in 0 gravity, and away from the earth things like static electricity and little things like pencil shavings matter a lot more.

 

Yeah, graphite dust is conductive and a lubricant; both things you do not want in a closed environment.

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Again i refer you to the 'logical' reivew of sales done for GW by an outside agency.

 

They found out black spray paint was the most cost effective to produce, sold the most and had high profit margins and therefore suggested GW focus on selling black spray paint... totally missing the reason said paint sells so well.But hey

 

 

'on paper'

 

it made perfect sense.

 

Kind makes me think of the toothpaste factories' problem with empty boxes.

 

"Understanding how important that was, the CEO of the toothpaste factory got the top people in the company together and they decided to start a new project, in which they would hire an external engineering company to solve their empty boxes problem, as their engineering department was already too stretched to take on any extra effort.

The project followed the usual process: budget and project sponsor allocated, RFP, third-parties selected, and six months (and $8 million) later they had a fantastic solution — on time, on budget, high quality and everyone in the project had a great time. They solved the problem by using some high-tech precision scales that would sound a bell and flash lights whenever a toothpaste box weighing less than it should. The line would stop, and someone had to walk over and yank the defective box out of it, pressing another button when done.

A while later, the CEO decides to have a look at the ROI of the project: amazing results! No empty boxes ever shipped out of the factory after the scales were put in place. Very few customer complaints, and they were gaining market share. “That’s some money well spent!” – he says, before looking closely at the other statistics in the report.

It turns out, the number of defects picked up by the scales was 0 after three weeks of production use. It should’ve been picking up at least a dozen a day, so maybe there was something wrong with the report. He filed a bug against it, and after some investigation, the engineers come back saying the report was actually correct. The scales really weren’t picking up any defects, because all boxes that got to that point in the conveyor belt were good.

Puzzled, the CEO travels down to the factory, and walks up to the part of the line where the precision scales were installed. A few feet before it, there was a $20 desk fan, blowing the empty boxes out of the belt and into a bin.

“Oh, that — one of the guys put it there ’cause he was tired of walking over every time the bell rang”, says one of the workers."

 

 

Proving once again that the best employees are smart and lazy.

 

There was a bit in the local paper about some economist chap saying that if you if you just did the same thing twice in a row your time should be better spent thinking of a way to automotise what you are doing.

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