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Viratin

Squadron Tactics Academy

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Introduction

 

So, we've had a ton of threads talking about Squadrons. There have been many suggestions on how we could change the game to make them work better, and also many complaints towards these suggestions that the game doesn't need to be changed. This topic is not for any of that.

 

The goal of this topic is to share tips and strategies for implementing squadrons.

 

To start things off, I'd like to begin with what the goals for squadrons, in the course of a game, are for both Imperials and Rebels. The two have vastly different groups of squadrons available to them, and they perform very differently in terms of their composition with the rest of the fleet. 

 

 

Imperials

 

Imperial fighters are not actually proficient in an offensive capacity against enemy ships. Our only Bomber is the TIE Bomber, which requires defensive screening and support from other TIEs in order to be effective. While some strategies can work out ways to make use of the TIE-Bomber, by and large they're having to focus far too much energy on making it work for it to be flexible in multiple scenarios. 

 

The main reason for this is that the anti-ship firepower in the Imperial fleet comes predominantly from our own capital ships. The Victory and Gladiator are bristling with firepower, and can rip apart smaller Rebel ships with ease once they're in firing range and arc. 

 

So, with the firepower of the Imperials coming from capital ships, what's the purpose of Squadrons?

 

In short: they're the defense. Considering that all but one of the Rebel squadrons have the Bomber special rule, Rebel squadrons can be very dangerous in groups against our ships, especially with their ability to get behind to the soft posteriors of our Victory's.

 

TIE-Fighters should be used to screen against enemy squadron attacks, not sent out into the fray ahead of capital ships. Remember: enemy squadrons can't fire at your capital ships if engaged with your squadrons. Your TIE-Fighters are fast enough that you should keep them behind or next to your SDs until the enemy extends their squadrons out to attack. Then, in your squadron phase, simply move your screen of TIEs in the way. While your TIEs may not get the opportunity to fire back (sorry little buggers with 3 Hull as they are), they'll prevent one or possibly two turns of your enemy's squadrons being able to fire at your SD. These turns will allow your SDs to engage the enemy capital ships hopefully without harassment. 

 

What about Interceptors, Advanced, and all our unique characters? 

 

Meh.

 

Considering that our #1 goal is to remove enemy capital ships, dumping more points into special characters or other classes of TIEs really isn't a good way to spend those points. There are some ways to make them worth it; the Soontir Fel + TIE Advanced combo can be deadly. However, by-and-large, you're putting more points into your expendable section of your fleet, and it's probably not necessary for our end goals.

 

 

So, basic lesson to learn: Squadrons are expendable, and to be spent to buy time for capital ships to get into better position to put the hurt to the enemy's ships.

 

 

Rebel Scum

 

Basically, complete opposite of everything above. Pretty much every squadron available to the Rebels is worth its points; they're durable and powerful. With the exception of the A-Wing, every Rebel ship has the Bomber special rule, which makes them all far more dangerous to capital ships, especially in groups. Even the A-Wing, the lightest built ship in the Rebel arsenal, has more hull points than the standard TIE-Fighter or the TIE-Interceptor. Unlike the Imperials, who have expensive Ships and cheap Squadrons, the Rebels largely have the opposite: cheaper ships, more expensive squadrons. So, your squadrons are not nearly so expendable.

 

The main problem people have been running into is this: how to get one's squadrons where they need to be in order to do damage? The problem's fairly simple: without Squadron commands, squadrons have to choose between shooting and moving. If they're not within their rather short range of a ship, they're not doing any damage at all. Smart Imperials will  use screens of TIEs and a bit of maneuvering to keep themselves away from your mass of bombers, and go after your ships like hungry mynocks. What's worse is, if you're in range to use your Squadron Command effectively, chances are that the Imperials are in firing range of your ships, which is not somewhere you want to be. 

 

So, how do we get around this? 

 

Well, here's a good working strategy I've seen. Use this as a way to take out an enemy VSD, hopefully their flagship. It works as a good core group for dealing your damage, especially since it doesn't look too dangerous with something like an Assault Frigate sitting nearby as a distraction.

 

Here's the basic composition to work with: Nebulon-B Escort with 3 X-Wings and 3 Y-Wings.

 

For your Nebulon-B:

 

Command Dials: Squadron first dial, Squadron second dial.

 

Turn 1) Approach the enemy ship head on. Wait, what? I know this sounds stupid, but hear me out. At full speed, a Nebulon will be in a Victory's danger-zone for one round of shooting if you approach it head-on. You're basically jumping right in front of it, and then careening past its side. Its side arcs aren't nearly so dangerous, and its rear is laughable. First turn, both lines tend to move towards each-other. Keep the Squadron Command dial as a token.

 

Turn 2) Second turn, you'll be right in front of them. You'll have to take a full barrage to the face, but hopefully you can mitigate this with Defensive tokens. Use your Squadron command and the saved token from turn 1 to move Group One into position (see squadron strategy below for more details)

 

Turn 3+) You'll be moving to their side, which isn't nearly so dangerous. After that, you're moving past them. By this point, we're on Turn 4. If you know anything about SDs, it's that they can't make a U-Turn to save their lives. Literally, in this case. Your ship essentially has Turn 5 and 6 to zip away, or maybe turn and try to put a few rounds into their rear. In either case, you're probably safe.

 

 

Here's what your squadrons do this whole time:

 

Setup: Set your squadrons in two groups, Group One consisting of your X-Wings and Group Two of your Y-Wings/B-Wings. Group One should be ahead of Group Two, but both abreast or behind your Nebulon-B. Theoretically, you don't have to put Group Two with or behind the Nebulon, but that largely depends upon your deployment.

 

Turn 1) Move both groups up alongside your Nebulon.

 

Turn 2) Have the Nebulon use its Squadron command to move Group One up to engage enemy fighter screens or directly assault the enemy SD if it has no fighter escort. Group Two needs to move up in the Squadron phase. The placement of Group Two is important: set them where the SD is going to be moving. VSDs are lumbering behemoths, and very easy to guess their position.

 

Turn 3) Hopefully you've positioned your second group well. If the VSD lands on them, you can place them wherever you want around him. Resist the urge to place yourself at the rear arc just yet; putting yourself behind him means he's gonna move further away next turn, and make it harder to move up to engage him. For now, putting yourself closer to where you think he'll move next turn is the best place to be. Group One will hopefully have finished off the enemy TIEs by now, or, if they weren't engaged in the first place, they should be free to move into position the same way that Group Two did in the previous turn. It should be especially easy now, since your Nebulon will have moved to their side; most VSDs will be making every attempt to make a U-turn to bring their front arc to bear at this point. That U-turn will not only make their movement predictable, but slow them down as well. 

 

Turn 4+) Groups One and Two should try to leapfrog each other for the rest of the game, continuing the strategy we've laid down in Turn 2 and 3. Keep whittling away at the VSDs shields, and make your crits count.

 

With this strategy, you remove the necessity for the Squadron Commands, freeing your ships from the burden of supporting your squadrons. It also lets your squadrons put constant pressure on the SD, and hopefully put some crits into it that'll really make it hurt. Dodonna works best for this strategy, since you can pick and choose the worst crits for your enemy to take. A helpful aid to this group is to have a CR90 Corvette B with Dodonna's Pride and Leading Shots set up to hit the VSD with a few extra crits that'll help to limit its movement or do extra damage. 

 

 

Alright, post up your own tips and strategies, or maybe improvements on the ones I listed above.

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Great job explaining some basic strategies for fighters.

 

Imperial fighters are more focused on a specific thing, so they require a good mixture to be truely effective (as you said, you end up sinking a decent amount of points to support them, especially when using bombers)

 

Rebels are more versatle fighters, they can easily fill multiple roles and need minimum support (they do love haven and yavaris though)

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Cool thoughts but do you think things will change when rogues and villians hits the streets?..and if so how?..

 

I'm not entirely sure how, but if nothing else it'll open up options to us. We still don't know a great deal about them, so we'll find out whenever Wave-II drops.

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Cool thoughts but do you think things will change when rogues and villians hits the streets?..and if so how?..

 

Squadrons are going to change immensly once wave 2 hits. All the new "squadrons" (are we really going to call them as squadrons when talking about them?) will bring a lot of new stuff to the table.

 

The rogue keyword allowing the ship to move and shoot without a squadron command will be a nice boost.

 

Jan Oars (i think?) will allow friendly squadrons to use her defense tokens, which will help standard squadrons a great deal (also named pilots if they end up losing their tokens).

 

Unfortunately, that is really all the info we have so far. But if grit and intel (along with any special abilities for the named squadrons) are as good as what we know so far, the squadron game is going to change dramaticly and should make it more interesting.

Edited by kami689

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I'm much more interested in tactics for currently available units.

Things like staggering the placement of squads to minimize the number that can be engaged vs maximizing the number that can perform a capital ship strike.

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I like all of your opinions, but my Imperial fighter doctrine is definitely the opposite of yours. I like a strong anti-squadron focus, with tight, well rehearsed maneuvers and positioning. I play aggressively with my ties, and I can say it's done better than when I played conservatively. I took second at a small tournament (I want to emphasize small. I'm not bragging, it was only 6 people.) However, I also want to mention that I only had two games under my belt at the time, and I believe I could do even better with my fighters now than I could then. Allow me to share with you my "Kill Group" strategy I've adopted.

 

The goal of this squadron combo is to kill all enemy squadrons in an efficient manner, guaranteeing my capital ships safety from bombing runs. Once air superiority is obtained (or if there were no rebel squadrons to begin with) I treat my squadrons like an extension of my side Victory's normally under-powered side arcs.

 

The "Kill Group" consists of Howlrunner, Mauler, 1 Tie Adv, Soontir, and 1 generic Tie Int. They begin in a very close "X" formation with all bases touching. Howly and Mauler in front, the Adv behind them (functioning as the center of the "X") and Soontir and the other Int. forming up the rear of the formation. In addition to this Kill Group, I have 3 generic ties used for two purposes. 1. Protect ships from bombing with a 1-man screen. 2. (the main purpose) These are my kamikaze ties. I will fly them headfirst into enemy squadrons to tie them down with engagement, ensuring that my "Kill Group" gets the first strike and only goes into battle on their terms. The "Kamikaze Group" usually flies into the enemy during the first or second squadron phase pending on enemy positions.

 

Immediately after the Kamikazes go in, the kill group follows up with unrelenting squadron commands. Howly goes first, then Mauler, the Tie Adv, Soontir, and lastly the generic Int. The combo of Howly and flight controllers means I'm consistently throwing 5-6 blue dice at enemy squadrons. This really does cut the rebel squadrons into ribbons. I also have expanded hangers and yularen, so my Vic is always getting the most out of Squadron commands. When attacking ships, the 5 dice are worth more than a Concentrate Fire command, so I don't feel as though I've gimped myself with the high squadron point cost at all. 

 

In addition to my Vic II, I run a Glad I with ACM and Demolisher. The Glad usually runs interference, to keep fire off of my Vic. The Vic still gets off some good front arc shots during the game, and Leading Shots helps me to maximize the fire power on the front, while the squadrons supplement my weaker arcs. Lastly, I run Motti for added survivabilty. Sorry for the wall of text, but I just wanted to show that there are other good ways to run Imperial fighters. I don't think our mine is better than yours or vise versa, but they both have strengths and weaknesses that can be planned around for effective play.

Edited by ThatAsianKid1

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@ThatAsianKid1

 

While there are certainly ways to make TIEs work, and especially to make them devastating at killing off enemy squadrons with the HowlRunner+Flight Controllers combo, remember to take their anti-ship attacks with a grain of salt. While exchanging 72 points of your list for the kill-group in order to gain 5 dice against enemy ships sounds like a fairly decent trade, we have to remember that the dice gained from squadron anti-ship attacks are far less efficient than those fired by another ship.

 

Apart from the TIE Advanced, who fires a Black die, each of the TIEs fires a blue die. For ships, Blue dice are one of the most useful; they have a result on every facing, so they are almost always useful in some capacity. However, 4 of these are hits, 2 are crits, and 2 are aim/focus/whatcha-call-it. Since squadrons can't make use of crit facings without the Bomber rule, we've cut down the efficiency of blue dice by half against ships; each TIE only has a 50/50 shot of doing any amount of damage to an enemy ship. 

 

Now, compare this to the Rebels, each of their ships (apart from the A-Wing) has the Bomber special rule. In addition, they all fire black die, with the exception of the X-Wing who gets the red die, and the B-Wing who gets a black and a blue. With each of them having bomber, it allows them to not only do damage with their critical results, but also deal face-up cards, which can sometimes change the momentum of the game. A black die has 50% chance to deal 1 hit, and 25% chance to do a hit and a crit when fired by a ship with Bomber. 

 

This major difference is the reason why I suggest using TIEs defensively (aggressively or conservatively), while letting your ships do the major hitting. 

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I can't help but notice no one has brought up Intel, the ability I think will up end the squadron meta in wave 2. The ability to ignore engagement is going to be huge for bomber builds. Currently, a Rhymer ball gets tied up by a lone A-Wing or interceptor. With Intel, though, you will no longer be able to simply stall with small numbers of fast fighters with counter. You're going to have to kill the ball in order to stop it. The same can be said for the rebels. I for one am very much looking forward to X-Wings, B-Wings, and Jan. Her sharable defense token will be nice, but free moving B-Wings (and Y-Wings for that matter) are going to be life changing.

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@ThatAsianKid1

 

While there are certainly ways to make TIEs work, and especially to make them devastating at killing off enemy squadrons with the HowlRunner+Flight Controllers combo, remember to take their anti-ship attacks with a grain of salt. While exchanging 72 points of your list for the kill-group in order to gain 5 dice against enemy ships sounds like a fairly decent trade, we have to remember that the dice gained from squadron anti-ship attacks are far less efficient than those fired by another ship.

 

Apart from the TIE Advanced, who fires a Black die, each of the TIEs fires a blue die. For ships, Blue dice are one of the most useful; they have a result on every facing, so they are almost always useful in some capacity. However, 4 of these are hits, 2 are crits, and 2 are aim/focus/whatcha-call-it. Since squadrons can't make use of crit facings without the Bomber rule, we've cut down the efficiency of blue dice by half against ships; each TIE only has a 50/50 shot of doing any amount of damage to an enemy ship. 

 

Now, compare this to the Rebels, each of their ships (apart from the A-Wing) has the Bomber special rule. In addition, they all fire black die, with the exception of the X-Wing who gets the red die, and the B-Wing who gets a black and a blue. With each of them having bomber, it allows them to not only do damage with their critical results, but also deal face-up cards, which can sometimes change the momentum of the game. A black die has 50% chance to deal 1 hit, and 25% chance to do a hit and a crit when fired by a ship with Bomber. 

 

This major difference is the reason why I suggest using TIEs defensively (aggressively or conservatively), while letting your ships do the major hitting. 

50/50 odds aren't necessarily too bad. The worth goes up even more when playing "Superior Positions" plus they can be useful in "Hyperspace Assault" Other than cost, the only other advantage Imp squadrons have is speed. Use your speed to determine engagements and attack first. At 3 hull, you are NOT a good meat shield, and it's just a waste. TIES need to get off some shots to maximize their use. The very reason why I run a kill group is to kill all bomber threats as quickly as possible. Rebel bombers can really do a nasty number on your ships, but they can also do a nasty number on your squadrons. If you let them get the first shots, you've lost the Imp advantage.

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While wiping out all of an enemy's squadrons is effective, for Imperials, I have found that, in order to neutralize bomb threats, you don't have to destroy them all. The main thing is to slow them down and get them away from their support ships. The goal I go for is to engage the majority of enemy bombers for at least two turns. Given that the first turn almost always has nothing but movement in it, holding them off for two turns after the first gives you two advantages.

 

First and most obviously, it greatly reduces the number of turns that your opponent has to use his squadrons. Out of the six turns in the game, you've reduced his squadrons to, at best, being active against your ships for only 3 turns. If your TIEs manage to kill a squadron or two, even better.

 

Secondly, if you've positioned yourself well, you can control the zone of engagement for both sides' ships. The enemy squadron support ship has two options: stay within range to support his squadrons, or back away. If the former, than you're all but guaranteeing optimal positioning for your ships to deliver their full payload; Gladiators can get in close, Victory's can bring their front arc to bear. If the latter, then you gain a very different advantage; without the support of their squadron support ship, rebel squadrons are slow enough to not be able to effectively keep up with your ships. They will have to use one or even two turns moving to get into position to attack. If this is the case, you've reduced the anti-ship capability of your enemy's squadrons to the last one or two turns of the game. By this time, your SDs should be able to destroy the enemy ships, and thus not have to worry about the enemy squadrons.

 

Tactically, I would suggest, if you are interested in playing squadron-heavy, perhaps you should consider playing Rebels instead? They are more in-line with the tactics you seem to prefer.

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I'll play Imperial until the day I die! lol And our disagreements aside, I have had good success playing Imperial squadrons aggressively. The whole reason why the "swarm" keyword exists is because that's what Imps do. They swarm the field in cheap, expendable fighters to project overwhelming force. I have found that if a Rebel player WANTS to keep his bombers in strike distance of you ships, then he will. It's really not that hard if that's what they want to do. I have had much more success with squadron heavy than squadron light, because my play style has me treating my squadrons like extensions of my ship. They're expendable upgrades that offer extreme flexibility, and I feel they are wasted if they are constantly relegated to only cannon fodder duty. Holding the enemy off for 2 or 3 turns is great, but neutralizing them for the whole 6 makes me feel more comfortable. B-wings only need one good turn to really make you hurt, and two turns to ruin your day.

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I like all of your opinions, but my Imperial fighter doctrine is definitely the opposite of yours. I like a strong anti-squadron focus, with tight, well rehearsed maneuvers and positioning. I play aggressively with my ties, and I can say it's done better than when I played conservatively. I took second at a small tournament (I want to emphasize small. I'm not bragging, it was only 6 people.) However, I also want to mention that I only had two games under my belt at the time, and I believe I could do even better with my fighters now than I could then. Allow me to share with you my "Kill Group" strategy I've adopted.

 

The goal of this squadron combo is to kill all enemy squadrons in an efficient manner, guaranteeing my capital ships safety from bombing runs. Once air superiority is obtained (or if there were no rebel squadrons to begin with) I treat my squadrons like an extension of my side Victory's normally under-powered side arcs.

 

The "Kill Group" consists of Howlrunner, Mauler, 1 Tie Adv, Soontir, and 1 generic Tie Int. They begin in a very close "X" formation with all bases touching. Howly and Mauler in front, the Adv behind them (functioning as the center of the "X") and Soontir and the other Int. forming up the rear of the formation. In addition to this Kill Group, I have 3 generic ties used for two purposes. 1. Protect ships from bombing with a 1-man screen. 2. (the main purpose) These are my kamikaze ties. I will fly them headfirst into enemy squadrons to tie them down with engagement, ensuring that my "Kill Group" gets the first strike and only goes into battle on their terms. The "Kamikaze Group" usually flies into the enemy during the first or second squadron phase pending on enemy positions.

 

Immediately after the Kamikazes go in, the kill group follows up with unrelenting squadron commands. Howly goes first, then Mauler, the Tie Adv, Soontir, and lastly the generic Int. The combo of Howly and flight controllers means I'm consistently throwing 5-6 blue dice at enemy squadrons. This really does cut the rebel squadrons into ribbons. I also have expanded hangers and yularen, so my Vic is always getting the most out of Squadron commands. When attacking ships, the 5 dice are worth more than a Concentrate Fire command, so I don't feel as though I've gimped myself with the high squadron point cost at all. 

 

In addition to my Vic II, I run a Glad I with ACM and Demolisher. The Glad usually runs interference, to keep fire off of my Vic. The Vic still gets off some good front arc shots during the game, and Leading Shots helps me to maximize the fire power on the front, while the squadrons supplement my weaker arcs. Lastly, I run Motti for added survivabilty. Sorry for the wall of text, but I just wanted to show that there are other good ways to run Imperial fighters. I don't think our mine is better than yours or vise versa, but they both have strengths and weaknesses that can be planned around for effective play.

Nice set up, very ugly to face.

My response to your kill group would be a single sacrificial A-Wing activated after your Kamikaze TIE and positioned to engage only 2 of your 5 ships (including Howlrunner preferably) - with the intention being to TIE you down or break up the formation.

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Viratin has good points, the 6 turn limit is key to being effective.  If we were playing unlimited turns (like X-Wing) then kills would be much more important, but as it is - sometimes it is better to let the squadrons get close but make sure they are engaged so they can't deliver their ordnance.

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Viratin has good points, the 6 turn limit is key to being effective.  If we were playing unlimited turns (like X-Wing) then kills would be much more important, but as it is - sometimes it is better to let the squadrons get close but make sure they are engaged so they can't deliver their ordnance.

 

Aye, this was a lesson I learned the hard way. The fact that you only have six turns really is a huge limiting factor, but it's also a timetable in which you can set up a strategy. No plan survives first contact with the enemy, but when you only have six points where the plan can change, you greatly reduce the number of variables and keep your strategy fairly together.

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I believe most if not all of Viratin's points are good. Even his fighter screen strategy is sound tactical advice. I don't believe my Kill Group is better than his screen formation, however I also do not believe his screen formation is better than my kill group. The purpose of this thread is to share tactics that have worked for us. I believe it is important to open one's mind up to the roles of Imperial squadrons. I use both Viratin's defensive screen AND my offensive Kill Group build. I believe if you only ever focus on one of these areas, you are seriously gimping yourself in the other. Fighters are about flexibility, and the time will come when you're playing a game where you need to know how to kill off the enemy squadrons. Conversely, I've learned when to hold my Kill Group back into a cautious fighter screen. It's important to practice maneuvers for both.

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I have found that using a few basic tie squads to be the best approach. Often the enemy gets only 1 or 2 really effective turns of squadron commands from their carrier before its out of range or your ship has flown past the squadrons. If you use the ties just with the intent to engage a few bombers in those crucial turns then the main threat to your ship is pretty much dealt with. It is hard to get the bombers back in the fight after their carrier is out of range or their target is gone. for 32 points you can get 4 squadrons to tie up enemy bombers or to take pot shots if they don't have squadrons.

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Nice set up, very ugly to face.

My response to your kill group would be a single sacrificial A-Wing activated after your Kamikaze TIE and positioned to engage only 2 of your 5 ships (including Howlrunner preferably) - with the intention being to TIE you down or break up the formation.

 

 

I'm curious as to the thinking behind this strategy. A single A-wing can work wonders against a cluster of five bombers ("Do I shoot the A-wing to peg it with 1 damage and risk taking 2, or do I just leave it alone and sit here in the middle of the board doing nothing?"), but against this particular group (Howlrunner + Mauler + Advanced + Soontir + Interceptor + Flight Controllers... up to 25 dice), it's hard to imagine the A-wing surviving even three volleys, depending on activation order. Maybe you peg a couple of the base units for a couple of damage on counters, but with three Scatter tokens in the mix, damage on hero units isn't likely. I'm also curious about why you'd engage only Mauler and Howlrunner. With 9 dice between them as-is (4.5 average hits) this is enough to take down the A-wing between them, so doesn't improve the A-wing's chances of survival by much. The A-wing has virtually no chance to defeat even one of the elites (3 blues 1x, at least 1 must be an accuracy to cancel "Scatter," so max damage output of 2 (halved to 1 with Brace) and then 1 on a counter (1 hit + 1 accuracy, otherwise the counter is scattered). A-wings are fantastic, even alone, but even they can't take multiple barrages from an overwhelming force of anti-fighter squadrons and walk away (except Tycho, of course).

 

I'm also curious about the OP's imperial guide, which ignores the Rhymer ball (I agree it's costly and requires some degree of shepherding, though it requires far less than a Y-wing attack group [or B-wings] due to its vastly superior speed and firing range). Rhymer also encourages a second-look at TIE Advanceds, which are the Empire's single-best unit for tying down enemy squadrons (decent anti-squadron dice, so they're a threat; 5 HP, so they're hard to one-shot). And while I agree most imperial elites aren't worth the upgrade cost against ships, Vader and Rhymer certainly are. Rhymer makes all of your fighters (even blue dice rollers) potent against ships. Unless the enemy has a dedicated fighter screen, you don't want Vader (and his two braces) harassing your ship. If there is a dedicated fighter screen, so much the better.

 

My preferred fighter screen is a TIE advanced and an interceptor, paired off. The TIE advanced's goal is to shoot first, then keep the interceptor alive for a round so it can get off 8 blue dice unmolested. If the interceptor gets off 1-2 counters before it inevitably dies, that's 13-15 dice, which translates on average to 1 kill, 2 severely weakened squadrons, and 2 turns of stalling. If supported by an H-9 Warlord barrage (auto-wounding squadrons), or Glad II anti-squadron support, the casualties can be higher, but that's extra gravy (staling's the main goal). For ship-heavy lists where I only take four squadrons to screen, I'll try to add Vader and Soontir to pack in more damage (TIE Advanced + Soontir, for auto damage + Soontir's improved survivability when the TIE advanced goes down; Vader + Interceptor to murder enemy squadrons/heroes before Vader's two braces give way). I tend to play my fighter screens aggressively, though (hang close to the VSDs, then jump on isolated bomber groups (or to the extreme flanks of one large fighter wing when they come into range), so I naturally gravitated to the TIE Adv/Interceptor pairing for maximum damage output. For a purely defensive screen (you're only there to tie up enemy squadrons, and every chance you get to shoot is a pure bonus), this pairing is probably too expensive.

 

I appreciate the thoughts expressed here. It's nice to see attention being paid to squadrons. :-)

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The ability to ignore engagement is going to be huge for bomber builds. Currently, a Rhymer ball gets tied up by a lone A-Wing or interceptor.

You're forgetting admiral chiraneu and corrupter, allowing the imperial leapfrog.

Sorry if this note has been responded to, cursory glance and making the kids dinner.

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I never noticed the warlord/H9 auto kill before last night's game. Devastating...one measly die at a time. But if that warlord has Gunnery Teams, he's not wasting anything to deal a damage to each fighter in his front arc.

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I never noticed the warlord/H9 auto kill before last night's game. Devastating...one measly die at a time. But if that warlord has Gunnery Teams, he's not wasting anything to deal a damage to each fighter in his front arc.

Not totally an autodamage.  Crits still don't count against squadrons and you can't modify it with Warlord.

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I never noticed the warlord/H9 auto kill before last night's game. Devastating...one measly die at a time. But if that warlord has Gunnery Teams, he's not wasting anything to deal a damage to each fighter in his front arc.

Not totally an autodamage.  Crits still don't count against squadrons and you can't modify it with Warlord.

 

 

 

Which is why you have the H9/Warlord...

Acc becomes Hit.

Crits become ACC, which becomes Hit.

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