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AgentJ

Fly Casual review?

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I was looking around for a review for this book but could not find one. Anyone know where I could find some reviews of this book? Not even sure how long it has been out, I have been in the hospital twice since the end of January having surgury both times.

 

 

Thanks,

 

AgentJ

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I was looking around for a review for this book but could not find one. Anyone know where I could find some reviews of this book? Not even sure how long it has been out, I have been in the hospital twice since the end of January having surgury both times.

 

 

Thanks,

 

AgentJ

I haven't seen one yet, but it's only been out a few days give.

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I'm waiting to get my hands on the final copy (I ordered it as soon as FFG had it in the store), but I can tell you that it is WELL worth getting. It basically does for smugglers what Stay On Target does for starfighter pilots: plenty of ships! (Note: it was one of the reasons why my "Freighter Creation Thread" was a little anemic near the end).

 

It also adds some awesome gear, the species are pretty well written, and my group LOVED the Charmer and Gunslinger specializations. 

 

I can't really say much else until the final product in in hand, but believe me when I say it will be WELL worth the money spent on it.

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My two cents:

 

New Specs are interesting. 

 

Gear is solid.

 

Ships are excellent.  The introduction of the Hwk-1000 will IMHO add another freighter to the short list of best sil 4 ships.  .

 

As usual the rest of the book (the "fluffy" section) is excellent.

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The only thing that I feel was missed was a few crates and storage containers in the equipment section.  I really assumed that they would have them there after the developers made comments about how properly organized gear can take less encumbrance.

 

New rule systems are well thought out, specializations were neat, and the equipment that was there was very good.  I do wonder why in the heck a in-ship music system requires 1 HP when they introduced droid auto-pilots and nav systems that required 0 hard points.

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The only thing that I feel was missed was a few crates and storage containers in the equipment section.  I really assumed that they would have them there after the developers made comments about how properly organized gear can take less encumbrance.

 

I had that very same complaint, honestly. 

 

Won't get my copy until tomorrow, so I really can't say too horribly much just yet ^^;

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 I do wonder why in the heck a in-ship music system requires 1 HP when they introduced droid auto-pilots and nav systems that required 0 hard points.

 

I thought that too, but maybe it's more for larger luxury ships since it consumes an entire HP.  I don't think it's equivalent to a car stereo, more like a PA system you'd find in a venue?  Or, maybe the designers are into that "pure analogue sound" and it's all hypertubes and whatnot.  

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The only thing that I feel was missed was a few crates and storage containers in the equipment section.  I really assumed that they would have them there after the developers made comments about how properly organized gear can take less encumbrance.

 

At the cost of more interesting and exciting equipment? Crates and storage containers can be easily priced (how about free with merchandise?) by your GM or group, and the effects are fairly common-sense. The designers have often said about past books that there just isn't room for everything.

 

If including crates and storage containers for something as negligible as knowing exactly how many blaster rifles you can fit in 60 encumbrance if you spend X credits, etc, would have removed some cool piece of gear like a weapon or another piece of gear with some creative ability you wouldn't have thought of on your own, I say keep the storage help out of books forever.

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New rule systems are well thought out, specializations were neat, and the equipment that was there was very good.  I do wonder why in the heck a in-ship music system requires 1 HP when they introduced droid auto-pilots and nav systems that required 0 hard points.

 

It's Neil Young's new PONO system. The hard point allows the characters to play high sample-rate music that allows the PCs to really feel the soul of what the artist intended. 

 

You could get your standard mp3 player for 0 hard points, but it's just not the same.

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The only thing that I feel was missed was a few crates and storage containers in the equipment section.  I really assumed that they would have them there after the developers made comments about how properly organized gear can take less encumbrance.

 

At the cost of more interesting and exciting equipment? Crates and storage containers can be easily priced (how about free with merchandise?) by your GM or group, and the effects are fairly common-sense. The designers have often said about past books that there just isn't room for everything.

 

If including crates and storage containers for something as negligible as knowing exactly how many blaster rifles you can fit in 60 encumbrance if you spend X credits, etc, would have removed some cool piece of gear like a weapon or another piece of gear with some creative ability you wouldn't have thought of on your own, I say keep the storage help out of books forever.

 

 

Yes, at the cost of a few inches of space.  I understand that you want everything new and shiny and better and frankly I enjoy the new gizmos too.

 

Some of us have heard the developers speak about this on podcasts and frankly this book would have been perfect to include them.  I would have been perfectly happy with a paragraph on the subject even in the fluff section.  I just don't think that something as basic as this should have be left out with as nebulous as they have made encumbrance.

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Yes, at the cost of a few inches of space.  I understand that you want everything new and shiny and better and frankly I enjoy the new gizmos too.

 

Some of us have heard the developers speak about this on podcasts and frankly this book would have been perfect to include them.  I would have been perfectly happy with a paragraph on the subject even in the fluff section.  I just don't think that something as basic as this should have be left out with as nebulous as they have made encumbrance.

 

I don't understand.

 

Why are "official" packaging rules so important? What's wrong with using common sense rather than hoping for a 3.5 style chart listing encumbrance conversion ratios?

 

Why should something so easily adjudicated by the GM take up precious space in their source books?

 

And why are you using what the developers said on podcasts as a reason for your argument when they just said in the order 66 episode on stay on target that you should use your common sense to decide how efficiently you can pack your ship?

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Why are "official" packaging rules so important? What's wrong with using common sense rather than hoping for a 3.5 style chart listing encumbrance conversion ratios?

 

Let's travel to an alternate dimension for a moment, where there are players that would enjoy arguing about minutae.  I shudder to think.

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Yes, at the cost of a few inches of space.  I understand that you want everything new and shiny and better and frankly I enjoy the new gizmos too.

 

Some of us have heard the developers speak about this on podcasts and frankly this book would have been perfect to include them.  I would have been perfectly happy with a paragraph on the subject even in the fluff section.  I just don't think that something as basic as this should have be left out with as nebulous as they have made encumbrance.

 

I don't understand.

 

Why are "official" packaging rules so important? What's wrong with using common sense rather than hoping for a 3.5 style chart listing encumbrance conversion ratios?

 

Why should something so easily adjudicated by the GM take up precious space in their source books?

 

And why are you using what the developers said on podcasts as a reason for your argument when they just said in the order 66 episode on stay on target that you should use your common sense to decide how efficiently you can pack your ship?

 

You realize the same could be said for nearly any rule in a Narrative system.  In particular, why spend space in the skill descriptions with what Advantage and thread do?  Why give us stats for ships that are similar but not identical to ones already listed, why not use common sense to create them?  All most of us want is a little more guidance from the people who have a little more handle on the system.

 

Also, why does every time someone asks for guidance on using rules, someone say they're asking for a detailed, full page D&D 3.5 chart?

Edited by Quicksilver

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Let's travel to an alternate dimension for a moment, where there are players that would enjoy arguing about minutae.  I shudder to think.

 

If your table is arguing about such pointless minutiae as how many credits worth of loot you can shove in your hold, your GM should put his/her foot down. They are the Game Master after all. They're in charge of making the game move quickly, that's not the rule's job.

 

Multi-quote is being naughty, so here's quicksilver's:

You realize the same could be said for nearly any rule in a Narrative system.  In particular, why spend space in the skill descriptions with what Advantage and thread do?  Why give us stats for ships that are similar but not identical to ones already listed, why not use common sense to create them?  All most of us want is a little more guidance from the people who have a little more handle on the system.

 

Also, why does every time someone asks for guidance on using rules, someone say they're asking for a detailed, full page D&D 3.5 chart?

 

Me again: You're listing things that are important to the narrative system, or things that are fun and simple, and don't involve sitting down and doing division at the game table. This is math that would slow the game down.

 

Now to be clear, I'm not trying to say that crates and boxes would be pointless and should never show up in the rules. I'm saying that there are reasons for them to be low on the priority list, and your games will be better off when you accept that and play narratively instead of rules-lawyery.

 

IMO, encumbrance is mostly there for the GM to point to when the players are getting ridiculously greedy/cheesy with the game as a quick rebuttal to the player's cries that they really could fit 3 crates of spice in their x-wing. That's the way the whole game is played, the rules are suggestions that can be thrown out if it makes sense/is cool.

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Are ship stats Important to the narrative system?  I know plenty of games where they're all but irrelevant - your simply running from things that are trying to shoot your, or using them as a handwave to get from planet A to Planet B.  I have no need to know if it's Speed 4 or speed 5 on some arbitrary scale, yet we don't say that having speed, maneuverability, crew capacity, passenger capacity and all that is a waste of space.

 

It seems the reason you don't care is that is your assuming the only reason people want to know about crates or box is to know how much loot they can stash.  I'll give you a hint, if they're in a Wayfarer, it's far more then a GM will ever give them.  That cargo container is large enough to stash a YT-1300 fully assembled.  I don't care about loot.  I want to know about how much bantha meat they're going to have to buy to "Fill up the hold" so the inspectors don't find the corillian brandy they're smuggling.  I want to know how many boxes they have to load up, so I know how many rounds they have to stall the stormtroopers trying to stop them.  Don't tell me that crates, pallets or boxes can't serve the narrative, but having stats for three different types of blaster rifle can.

 

I'm not saying that any packaging/crate rules or hell, simple guidance, should be enshrined in as a gold standard any more than any other rule (as you seem to think i'm saying) but when your character archetypes include people who haul stuff in space ships for a living, having an idea about how one hauls stuff in space ships might be useful.

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Are ship stats Important to the narrative system?  I know plenty of games where they're all but irrelevant - your simply running from things that are trying to shoot your, or using them as a handwave to get from planet A to Planet B.  I have no need to know if it's Speed 4 or speed 5 on some arbitrary scale, yet we don't say that having speed, maneuverability, crew capacity, passenger capacity and all that is a waste of space.

 

It seems the reason you don't care is that is your assuming the only reason people want to know about crates or box is to know how much loot they can stash.  I'll give you a hint, if they're in a Wayfarer, it's far more then a GM will ever give them.  That cargo container is large enough to stash a YT-1300 fully assembled.  I don't care about loot.  I want to know about how much bantha meat they're going to have to buy to "Fill up the hold" so the inspectors don't find the corillian brandy they're smuggling.  I want to know how many boxes they have to load up, so I know how many rounds they have to stall the stormtroopers trying to stop them.  Don't tell me that crates, pallets or boxes can't serve the narrative, but having stats for three different types of blaster rifle can.

 

I'm not saying that any packaging/crate rules or hell, simple guidance, should be enshrined in as a gold standard any more than any other rule (as you seem to think i'm saying) but when your character archetypes include people who haul stuff in space ships for a living, having an idea about how one hauls stuff in space ships might be useful.

 

1. No, I wasn't saying ship stats were important to the narrative system. I was saying that about the dice mechanics.

2. The point about ships was they don't require you to break out a spreadsheet in the middle of a game session.

3. All of your examples of things you want to know can easily be decided narratively right now without rules for crates.

4. How effective someone is in combat is not fully narrative. It relies on numbers, for good reason. There's no comparable need for exact numbers for compressing cargo.

5. You already have a simple guide, its your common sense. They can't print anything more simple than that.

 

Again, I'm not saying exact stats for crates would be bad, just that they're not important enough to warrant complaining that they're not here.

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I have a non-crate-related question!

 

Table 3-1 has the base payout for smuggling different both restricted and unrestricted goods.

 

Is the listing for unrestricted goods really for "smuggling" them, or is it just "shipping?" The language in the text implies that this is all smuggling (i.e. illegal), but if a good isn't restricted, then wouldn't it likely be legal to transport?

 

If it is for smuggling then what is the going rate for shipping? Not every run is going to be high-stakes, and smart crews will look to move some goods alongside whatever else they plan on doing whenever they go from world to world.

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You´re my hero, Doc Weasel, can´t wait to grab my copy of FC, but it won´t arrive here in germany for the next two weeks I fear. So your talent trees make the waiting a little bit less hard. Now I can translate them too  ;-)

 

Thanks

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I have a non-crate-related question!

 

Table 3-1 has the base payout for smuggling different both restricted and unrestricted goods.

 

Is the listing for unrestricted goods really for "smuggling" them, or is it just "shipping?" The language in the text implies that this is all smuggling (i.e. illegal), but if a good isn't restricted, then wouldn't it likely be legal to transport?

 

If it is for smuggling then what is the going rate for shipping? Not every run is going to be high-stakes, and smart crews will look to move some goods alongside whatever else they plan on doing whenever they go from world to world.

 

It would be like smuggling cigarettes across certain state lines.  More a matter of avoiding taxes and making a profit that way I would think.

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