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RebelDave

Travel Times

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OK OK, I couldn't find anything following a search that answered my question.

 

And yes, I am well aware that Speed and Route are huge factors.

 

But as a rule of thumb, for lets say an 'Average' speed vessel, how long would it take to travese the galaxy from edge to edge? (Ball park figure)

 

Last week I came up with a number of 2 weeks, for my players to get from Tattooine/Ryloth to Formos, in the Fang (Hyperdrive rating of 2).

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I really hate to say this, but speed times in Edge, and hyperspace travel is really the one thing I truly hate about this game. For me, computing a route through Hyperspace should be more concrete than narrative.  But oh well.  

 

*It has been stated in other forms that a military vessel (X1 hyperdrive) can cross the known galaxy in about a month. 

 

What I do know is just runs my travel times at the speed of plot. If they need to get somewhere faster I just say it will take you 8 hours to get there, for every advantage you get, you can shave one hour off the travel time. I don't make travel time an integral part of my games. 

 

 

*this comes from old lower level canon sources such as WEG, WotC, and a few other places now not deemed "canon" by the big eared one. 

 

And dang it RebelDave, get your own stoopid avatar!  :P FFG when are we going to get to use our own avatars!!! You lousy......internet connection lost...

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Personally I had a party going from a planet I made up in Hutt Space to the edge of the Unknown Regions in a couple of weeks or so, and then another couple of weeks to reach their destination within the Unknown Regions. For me there's more of a 'frontier' feel if you can't cross the whole galaxy in a day or two. 

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I think it was the old D20 Revised system that had a great table for time from Deep core to anywhere in the galaxy in set in hours. (weeks, if I remember correctly, to reach the outer rim or unknown regions.) Your astrogation roll cut that time.


I've always tried to convert that to the newest system, mostly just for a ballpark figure and flavor. 


But the narrative system allow the GM to simply say, "You plotted course well, (or not!?) which should allows you to get to your destination with a few hours/minutes to spare."


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The slower the better, IMHO. It places greater importance on stopping at various fueling and resource stations, having unexpected stops, greater need of finding local services, and other points that push players to not just book it out of a system after being there for 3 hours for a quest.

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The slower the better, IMHO. It places greater importance on stopping at various fueling and resource stations, having unexpected stops, greater need of finding local services, and other points that push players to not just book it out of a system after being there for 3 hours for a quest.

 

This has nothing to do with the speed of the craft, this had to do with the craft's endurance.  If anything, the slower the transit the more they need to get on their way again as soon as possible.  If you want local resources and fuel stops to mean something, toss out WEG's old "6 years of consumables" and put in something shorter.  Look at modern shipping vessels, they can take months, but almost always go point-to-point because they can easily run for twice as long.  (Also, don't charge fuel based on hyperspace time or for the run-up to hyperspace.  Otherwise stopping costs money.)

 

One thing we do know about transit times in Star Wars (beside that they're all speed-of-plot) is that they are almost entirely dependant on route conditions rather than distance.  It might take less than a week to fly from one end of the Corillian way to the other if you're on the trade route the entire way, but take you the same time to get half way across a sector on back-passages.  It's not unlike driving from one city to a location in the next one along a highway - you can easily spend as much time waiting for lights and navigating the small surface streets as you do on the highway, despite the latter being 80% of the miles you travel.

 

So you really do have to fudge it based on the remoteness of the starting system, the remoteness of the destination system, the existence of the major hyperlanes, the quality and timing of the data used, the skill in calculation, the need/desire for secondary stops, and dumb luck.

Edited by Quicksilver

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Basically let the narrative be your guide, and don't let the minutia of details get in the way of a good story, if you want to give them time in hyperspace to heal up or work on attachment or mechanics related side projects do so.

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I had a player not too long ago that really wanted the minutia of it all. He would pour over the Essential Atlas trying to "find" the best route and take literally hours of table time talking about the hyperspace route. He was like, first we jump here, then we go to that route, then over to this one.

 

I'm not saying this a bad thing necessarily, but in the FFG game it is. I tried to explain to him that this game really does not quite work that way, and that no one in the group really has a good skill at astrogation.  

 

In short, the GM picks a difficulty, usually around Average to Hard, throw in a setback die or two for a roaming nebula, a dust cloud, space tumbleweeds, whatever, and roll the skill. Threats can either lengthen the journey time or the astrogation check. Failure means the computer says. nope, we can't go thought that there star. Despair means you may have a mishap, and jump out at the wrong spot light years away. Advantages do the opposite, and a Triumph can get a new route that is free and clear of those pesky space tumbleweeds and quagmires. 

 

My player was not happy about that and really wanted the Space Navigator feel to the game I guess some games have Traveler maybe? The old WEG/WotC did it kind of that way. This along with some other disputes caused him to leave...Allowing for much faster hyperspace jumps. 

 

--we went from a X10 down to a X.25.  ;)

Edited by R2builder

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I had a player not too long ago that really wanted the minutia of it all. He would pour over the Essential Atlas trying to "find" the best route and take literally hours of table time talking about the hyperspace route. He was like, first we jump here, then we go to that route, then over to this one.

 

I'm not saying this a bad thing necessarily, but in the FFG game it is. I tried to explain to him that this game really does not quite work that way, and that no one in the group really has a good skill at astrogation.  

 

In short, the GM picks a difficulty, usually around Average to Hard, throw in a setback die or two for a roaming nebula, a dust cloud, space tumbleweeds, whatever, and roll the skill. Threats can either lengthen the journey time or the astrogation check. Failure means the computer says. nope, we can't go thought that there star. Despair means you may have a mishap, and jump out at the wrong spot light years away. Advantages do the opposite, and a Triumph can get a new route that is free and clear of those pesky space tumbleweeds and quagmires. 

 

My player was not happy about that and really wanted the Space Navigator feel to the game I guess some games have Traveler maybe? The old WEG/WotC did it kind of that way. This along with some other disputes caused him to leave...Allowing for much faster hyperspace jumps. 

 

--we went from a X10 down to a X.25.  ;)

 

Not everyone enjoys a narrative game.  Some players love to figure out every last detail and there is nothing wrong with that.  Plenty of games support those so inclined, but he needs to find like minded players.

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I don't recall WEG having much attention to detail in charting routes (asides from the travel time charts for major systems), ost of the time they fell back on a rule of thumb very close to FFG's guidelines.

 

West End Games stopped printing books back in 1997, and back then there really weren't any maps of the galaxy. Just the order of regions from the Core to the Outer Rim.

 

Travel time is largely dependent upon the skill roll, representing current route conditions, the navigator's ability to find alternate routes (not listed on the atlas that's for sure), and any mishaps. Estimating travel times beyond the books' rough guidelines is pretty much in the realm of the all-knowing GM and the roll of the dice.

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OK, lots of narrative ideas here.... but I am really looking for a base line.

 

So, lets take some numbers and give a rough ball park, so I have base line to work on.

 

Lets say:

Optimal conditions

Trained Navigators

Maintained Nav Systems and Data

 

How long to travel from one side of the galaxy, to the other for:

 

Military Craft.

Pleasure Galaxy Tours

Average Freighter.

 

How many stops for refueling?

 

A month?

Two?

 

(Obviously, plot is a huge factor, and that varies, so is size of the ship, and if you are 'using the highway' or 'back roads' but assume you can use the main routes, without any hassle, what would you suggest would be a good baseline time?)

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I'm a bit different with my campaign, and have a map of the sector the players will be running around it. However, I think that going from one system to the next occurs at the speed of plot. Just keep a gazetteer for your area of space or the routes your players travel. The reason for this is simple - consistency.

 

As a GM, we have a bucket load of stuff to remember. Do yourself a favour and get a big lined page notebook, and write stuff in there. Have a couple of pages devoted to travel, and record the jumps they make.

 

Also, take note that each ship has a speed of its hyperdrive. This just means that if your players have a x3 and the bad guys have a x2, they are gonna get there first. If the reverse is true, the players get to do what they need to do at their destination and have to deal with the bad guys on the way out.

 

A good example of this was in Star Wars Rebels in the episode Idiots Array. The heroes got to the farm, but the bad guys, who had a faster hyperdrive, and still have time to walk to the farm, got the jump on the heroes.

 

Again - speed of plot is your rule of thumb.

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Yes. As I said, speed of plot aside.

 

I just want a base line number ontop of which I can plan everything else.

 

Yes, speed of drive is a factor.

Yes, route is a factor.

Yes, size of ship and stops for fuel is a factor.

 

I just want to know what people think is a reasonable amount of time, to travel from one side of the galaxy, to the other.

 

 

Yes, I know the Falcon is fast, but would probably have to stop a fair bit due to the size if its fuel tanks, and that a Star Destroyer may not need to stop as much. (Not knowing exactly how fuel efficient a hyperdrive is, or if size is a factor).

 

I am just trying to get an idea of how big the galaxy is.

 

I dont need examples of speed of plot for this.

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WEG had some nice charts that told you the travel times back in the day when there were only lie 8 planets in the galaxy.  :lol:

 

Dang it RebelDave!!! I keep thinking your posts are mine!  :lol:

 

I am just pulling stuff out my my derriere here, but I would go with:

Military vessel about a month non stop.

A cruise liner...man they would stop a lot, I could see a Star Tours Pan-galactic cruise package going on for at least 2 months if not 3-4. 

Most freighters could do the trip in about 2-3. 

 

I look at galactic shipping like our ocean shipping. The huge bulk freighters are going to carry tons and tons of stuff from major port to major port. Then smaller vessels are going to ferry it to more out of the way and harder to reach locations. I don't think many ships make the pan-galactic flight too often, as there is no need. Also, who wants to run down to the final week of rations if you don't have to. Kind of like on Earth, we don't have planes and ships that will make one trip around it with out stopping, and most never make a complete circle around it. Everyone has their shipping/patrol routes they stick too. 

 

Just my 2 creds from astromech to astromech!  :D

Edited by R2builder

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Yes. As I said, speed of plot aside.

 

I just want a base line number ontop of which I can plan everything else.

 

Yes, speed of drive is a factor.

Yes, route is a factor.

Yes, size of ship and stops for fuel is a factor.

 

I just want to know what people think is a reasonable amount of time, to travel from one side of the galaxy, to the other.

 

 

Yes, I know the Falcon is fast, but would probably have to stop a fair bit due to the size if its fuel tanks, and that a Star Destroyer may not need to stop as much. (Not knowing exactly how fuel efficient a hyperdrive is, or if size is a factor).

 

I am just trying to get an idea of how big the galaxy is.

 

I dont need examples of speed of plot for this.

 

That's the issue - there really aren't any 'baseline' times to work off. It entirely depends on the route you take (major hyperspace route, backwater routes, etc), the speed of your hyperdrive, fuel stops, size of the ship, etc.

 

There are no real figures with which to build a baseline for anything, so you're basically going to have to make those figures up yourself.

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OK, Galaxy Guide 6 may be your friend if you really want to get to the nitty gritty - just make sure your players want that. Not everyone wants to play in Star Wars: The Economic Menace.

 

If they do though, try these on for size:

 

FUEL CONSUMPTION TABLE
Entering Hyperspace - 1 Cell
Six Hours in Hyperspace - 1 Cell
Month of Real-Space Ops - 1 Cell
One Hour of Combat Maneuvers - 1 Cell
One Hour of Atmospheric Flight - 1 Cell

Edited by GM Hooly

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@Millandson

 

Thats why im asking for opinions, I just want an idea of the size of the galaxy for narrative purposes, some number to work from.

 

If it took a day in the Falcon, its a tiny place.

 

If its 2 months, its a HUGE place.

 

Which is why i asked for ideas based on some standard routes, without issue, etc.

 

 

Im not trying to throw numbers at players, I just want an idea in my head so I can narrate size more easily.

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(on Hooly's)

I'd just like to say I hate that chart, because it makes faster engines more fuel efficient, completely eliminates the value of trade-line planets, and makes no sense with airspeeders & landspeeders, and otherwise almost completely goes against everything we see.

 

(Back to OP)

(Note: I assume Hyperdrives can be 'turned down' and do not alway activate at top speed.)

 

1) Military Craft

Most military craft have 1x drives. Given what we see in the movies, it seems that in good conditions, they can get across a sector in an hour or two.  We consistently see same-day reinforcements in Clone Wars and other similar actions.  In RotJ, the rebel fleet had to make decent time from Sullust to Endor.

 

That being said, 95% of the time, Military craft are patrolling, rather than moving to intercept.  In this case they're probably trying to be highly fuel efficient while jumping from nearby system to nearby system.  In this case, I'd assume they're using several hours per transit.  (The equivalent of a x20 or higher)

 

2) Pleasure Cruise

This one is both easy and hard.  A well run pleasure craft will always be in hyperspace for 8-10 hours, while the passengers sleep.  Hyperspace is boring, so you want to be at your next location by the time most of your guests are awake and moving, however, you're a large craft and fuel is expensive, so you want to slow the jump as much as possible.  

 

3) Freighter

I kind of need to split this one:

Superfrighter:

There is a special calculation here - the point fuel savings from going slower are offset by the increased cost of salary & supplies.  As I tend to assume fuel is fairly costly, this would be on the slower side of things, similar to a cruising Military ship.  This means a few days to cross a sector, a few weeks to cross an oversector, and a couple months to go from end-to-core on a tradeline.  Note the latter is much less than the sum of it's parts due to being an inherently much faster route.

Light Freighter

These tend to carry time-sensitive cargos, or just through boredom move faster than their super-freighter counterparts.  We know the Falcon made Tatooine to Alderaan (~1/2 the galaxy) in no more than a couple days.  (Think how much Ben and Luke would have stunk - they had no luggage!)  Assuming he's going full speed (Ben did pay for a "fast ship") your average light freighter has to be able to make that trip in about a week, although it might opt to take 2 or 3 to save fuel costs if their timeline allows.

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