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Venomous Filigree

Stress received from ranged attacks.

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If you have negative dice left in your pool after a ranged attack (whether successful or not) I would argue that this should be mental stress on most occasions. Does that mean you shoot with Logic or if you shoot with Dexterity can stress be received in a category different to that being used for the roll?

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Physical stress from a ranged attack can be explained rather easily, if you're so inclined.  For example, when using a bow and arrow it is remarkably easy to snap the bowstring against your forearm, if you're not an experienced archer.  Believe me, as I learned once upon a time in high school gym class, that hurts like a sonofabitch.

 

For guns, kickback from taking the shot could sprain your wrist.  The hot shell casing being ejected could brush your body (an inexperienced gun man might be holding the gun in the the wrong hand, so that the gun is ejecting shells across his body rather than away from it.)  A gun with a particularly heavy trigger might just get tiresome on the trigger finger after a few pulls.

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I think stress can be even more than the above. Think about the situation as a whole. If you are running through a house shooting at zombies, and you suffer stress from a roll. It could mean that as you were running through a doorway you hit your shoulder on the doorpost. I do this sometimes walking through my house, let alone if i was worried about death by zombie

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I think stress can be even more than the above. Think about the situation as a whole. If you are running through a house shooting at zombies, and you suffer stress from a roll. It could mean that as you were running through a doorway you hit your shoulder on the doorpost. I do this sometimes walking through my house, let alone if i was worried about death by zombie

 

Excellent point.

 

It can sometimes be easy to focus too much on the action in question and forget about everything else happening around the character at the time.  Remembering to include these details in the combat description can really bring the game to life.

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I think Mental Stat should be used for shooting anyway.  The gun is the great equalizer after all. 

 

In medieval times, the biggest and the strongest often was the last man standing due to their physical size and strength.  With the introduction of the gun, even a small child could kill a giant of a man with relative ease.  When testing to shoot a gun with the Mental Stat, the stress could be gained by hitting your target, but because they are charging at you, you hit it in a different spot than where you were aiming, or even missed it altogether.  You would then be able to recover your Stress by taking the time to stop and relax, let your heart rate slow down, and breath. 

 

I also support the idea that Stress can be received in multiple categories, so you could take some Mental Stress due to the horror of seeing someone's face explode after you shoot them, as well as some Physical Stress for any of the reasons others mentioned above.

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Mental stress is about going crazy...shooting a gun may not result in going crazy.

Maybe it's because I'm older than I was, but mental/social stress can have physical consequences. Any time I think of physical stress in the game that isn't the direct result of contact, I picture high blood pressure and hearts beating much faster than they should.

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I see a lot of good ideas in here, and as someone who's literally put thousands of rounds of ammo down the range in the last few years and done some minor competition, let me throw in my .02.

 

First, I'll address the Mental stress brough up by cosmic55 - you may not go crazy just by shooting the gun, but what happens after you shoot the gun could possible aid in your mental breakdown. This is why PTSD is a thing with vets and others who have had to kill. I don't care how well you can aim and shoot a gun, but when you have to do it in your defense it'll mess with you and it is suggested that you go see a therapist after it happens. Imagine being in a room full of zombies and shooting one that's a tad too close to you, getting your face sprayed with it's blood and/or it's corpse falling on you or a part of you (like the foot) - it's going to be unnerving for almost any normal human. You could argue some mental stress, but this would probably be in the first session - that first time you kill a zombie, the first time you shoot a non-zombie for whatever reason. It's built into the system and the GM can just hand it out in addition to the physical stress.

 

Now onto physical stress and injuries - I've never seen or heard more than a romor of someone spraining their wrist from firing a handgun. There's a video that went around claiming that a girl broke her wrist, but I watched the video and there's no evidence of a break though it probably hurt a bit. I guess it's possible if they are frail or have weak wrists though...anyway.

 

More common injuries at the range that I have experienced are mostly minor cuts and bruses and, depending on the gun, burns.

 

Here are some specific injuries that I've experienced myself:

 

  • Brass burns (any semi-auto gun) - i don't care how experienced you are, you get these. I tell everyone who comes to the range to wear close toed shoes and high neck shirts (even the guys, but expecially the girls). My wife has a nice scar between her breasts from .22 brass.
  • Slide bite (most semi-auto handguns, but glocks are known to be the worst) - this is when the slide comes back and the fatty part of your hand between your thumb and pointer finger aren't clear. It hurts pretty bad. It can also happen if you have horrible form and put your thumb behind the slide (i did this the first time I ever shot a handgun long ago, it hurts more than slide bite - I call it slide chomp)
  • burns from cylinder (revolvers) - You can't shoot a revolver like you're supposed to shoot a handgun, with a handgun your thumbs end up touching the slide. On a revolver there is a gap between the cylinder and the barrel, and part of the explosion that propels your bullet leaks out. You can google injuries, I burnt my thumb once mildly because it was too close though I was aware enough not to put it right beside the gap. Some people have lost some of their thumb from holding a revolver improperly, google image search "revolver thumb blown off" if you don't have a weak stomach
  • burns from touching the barrel - shooting a few rounds from a barrel will make it uncomfortable to touch, shooting a lot of rounds through a barrel will cook bacon (google it) - yet, even experienced shooters sometimes get burned because they misjudge the length of time it takes for their barrel to cool.
  • burns from touching a suppressor ("silencer") - so, you know how I said shooting a few rounds from a barrel can make it uncomfortable? Well like 2 will make a suppressor uncomfortable, 3+ can make it burn the crap out of your hand. I always shoot suppressors with heat resistant gloves on because every 5-10 rounds it's good to tighten the suppressor on the barrel, unless they have a quick release or you could loctite it (red, not blue) - but i'd only do that in a real emergency b/c it'll be a pain to get it off. Ok, enough about suppressors.
  • fingers getting pinched (ever gun ever) - guns are machines with a lot of moving parts, if you put a finger or other body part in a place that moves and fire the gun it will get pinched. Garand thumb is a thing for garands (google it), and sometimes you will pinch something when reloading a magazine. I've done this on glocks, but I have fat hands so that goes against me.
  • cuts - there are some sharpish parts on guns, sometimes they catch you and you get cut
  • recoil bruises - if you improperly shoulder a higher caliber rifle or shotgun, it'll hurt and you might have a big bruise the next day or two.
  • pistol grip only shotguns - so, don't ever buy a pgo shotgun - if you want to aim it you have to hold it infront of your face, you could easily break a nose or loose some front teeth if you don't keep it far enough from your face

These are injuries from just standing and shooting, no moving. Add moving into that and you've got a whole host of more injuries that can happen, and it'll increase the chances of one of the above happening. You could stub a toe, fall, sprain an ankle, bump into something, a lot of guys who compete moving/shooting competitions wear kneepads because you may have to drop to a knee or go prone quickly and that can damage your knees.

 

So there's my .02, I hope it helps you.

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First, I'll address the Mental stress brough up by cosmic55 - you may not go crazy just by shooting the gun, but what happens after you shoot the gun could possible aid in your mental breakdown. This is why PTSD is a thing with vets and others who have had to kill. I don't care how well you can aim and shoot a gun, but when you have to do it in your defense it'll mess with you and it is suggested that you go see a therapist after it happens. Imagine being in a room full of zombies and shooting one that's a tad too close to you, getting your face sprayed with it's blood and/or it's corpse falling on you or a part of you (like the foot) - it's going to be unnerving for almost any normal human. You could argue some mental stress, but this would probably be in the first session - that first time you kill a zombie, the first time you shoot a non-zombie for whatever reason. It's built into the system and the GM can just hand it out in addition to the physical stress.

 

 

This in addition to the possible stress of that zombie being someone you knew before they became a zombie would be traumatic. Seeing them as a zombie is stress inducing let alone having to 'kill' them in self defence. I think if it makes sense for the story then why not inflict mental stress after discharging a firearm? 

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First, I'll address the Mental stress brough up by cosmic55 - you may not go crazy just by shooting the gun, but what happens after you shoot the gun could possible aid in your mental breakdown. This is why PTSD is a thing with vets and others who have had to kill. I don't care how well you can aim and shoot a gun, but when you have to do it in your defense it'll mess with you and it is suggested that you go see a therapist after it happens. Imagine being in a room full of zombies and shooting one that's a tad too close to you, getting your face sprayed with it's blood and/or it's corpse falling on you or a part of you (like the foot) - it's going to be unnerving for almost any normal human. You could argue some mental stress, but this would probably be in the first session - that first time you kill a zombie, the first time you shoot a non-zombie for whatever reason. It's built into the system and the GM can just hand it out in addition to the physical stress.

 

 

This in addition to the possible stress of that zombie being someone you knew before they became a zombie would be traumatic. Seeing them as a zombie is stress inducing let alone having to 'kill' them in self defence. I think if it makes sense for the story then why not inflict mental stress after discharging a firearm? 

 

In this case, as a GM I would be almost tempted to have the player run two tests:  the first is a mental test to see if he can even fire at someone who used to be his friend/family member/loved one/etc (with negative dice added for closeness of the relation).  Failure of this test would result in the player freezing (typical in bad zombie movies when the character has to kill his [fill in close relationship here], only to freeze, forcing someone else to do the deed).  If the player succeeds, then he goes into the actual act of firing the gun, along with all the physical detriments that can arise from such action (as mentioned in posts above).

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