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EmraldArcher

Something I don't get about LCGs....

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In other words, if either FFG or the customer has to pay for the extra useless stuff that comes with additional core sets (either losing out on profit for the former or having to pay for something you don't need in case of the latter), it's the customer that has to cough up the cash.

Edited by Gridash

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In other words, if either FFG or the customer has to pay for the extra useless stuff stuff that comes with additional core sets (either losing out on profit for the former or having to pay for something you don't need in case of the latter), it's the customer that has to cough up the cash.

When the customer has repeatedly proven willing to do so in past games, yes, it makes sense for the business to do this. They exist to make as much profit as possible.

FFG are a business, don't be surprised that their bottom line is a primary concern for them.

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Well, the practice still seems questionable to me. That said, I don't think I can complain when I compare it to what Games Workshop has been doing.

 

This is still a much cheaper hobby.

Edited by Gridash

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People always use the Games Workshop analogy to make themselves feel better about the fact that FFG games are the mid-range cost-games but what they tend to overlook in these discussions is that if a person decides to get out of the game with GW or one of the CCG/CMG games they usually at least get their money back on what they spent. This is what I call "recycled gaming funds." I've opted out of several games over the years and sold enough stuff to pay for what I purchased. Plus I still have quite a bit left of several of those games, enough that I could still throw down semi-competitively if I the opportunity arose.


 


The same cannot be said with FFG's games. They have amazing customer service and great game balance in their designs but there's a set cost for product whether it is entirely useful or not and there's nothing in it that is just high-dollar return of investment. Hate on that all you want but it is a fact. LCGs are a routine drain with no method of recouping the money spent on it. In the financial world that is called "diminishing returns."


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All true. It's just that it's simply another way of saying that there is no secondary market - which isn't surprising for games that are not designed to be collectible.

 

Now, if they had done what they had originally said they would do when introducing the LCG model and let cycles go out of print....

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a routine drain with no method of recouping the money spent on it. In the financial world that is called "diminishing returns."

 

 

... actually, no it isn't.  Diminishing returns are something different financially.

 

Diminishing returns example: Invest $100, your investment is worth $100.  Invest $200, your investment is worth $150.  Invest $300, your investment is worth $175.  Each dollar invested increases the value of your investment by a smaller amount than the previous dollar invested.

 

The LCG model does have a form of diminishing returns in the core box.  The first core box you purchase contains 100% useful cards.  The second core box contains some useless (duplicate) cards.  The third core box contains more unusable (more than a full playset) cards than the second did.  The fourth core box purchased would be entirely composed of excess cards.  Each successive core box provides "less" than the one before it.

 

The LCG model does not necessarily display diminishing returns in a financial sense.  You may not be able to recoup your investment, but this is not a DR function.

 

What you are referring to is "unrecoverable expense".

 

I also fail to see how this is different from any other non-collectible board or card game.  I could not resell my Sentinels of the Multiverse set for even half much as I paid for it (about 45% of new cost on the secondary market).  My Summoner Wars collection will fetch 35-40% of its "new" price on the secondary market on a good day.  Talisman + expansions is maybe worth 75% of its "new" price (minis help a board game hold a little more secondary market value).

 

LCGs are more of a "board game with lots of expansions" than they are an "investment".  They share a secondary market with other board games, and expecting them to perform differently than the rest of the market would be financially inadvisable.  (Out of Print board games are a different secondary market.  Space Hulk is pretty $$$ now.  If an LCG ever goes out of print - Warhammer:Invasion is the likely first candidate - full playset collections will eventually probably be worth more than the initial cost.)

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Yeah, most minis will fetch you significantly less than what you paid* for them... unless they happen to go OOP, as stated. 

Magic is hardly a solid investment, in that even the most expensive card will lose its value when the set rotates out of print, and only a handful of cards in each set will retain or gain value over time (mostly due to modern/EDH becoming more popular). 

 

That being said, I found an online retailer that is popping off the conquest core box for 25$ a piece with free shipping over $100, and i splurged on 4 boxes! :\

In my mind retail 2 boxes would be $80, so i can get three (a full playset of all the rares) from that place for slightly less. Then it was a matter of paying $15 bucks shipping (bringing my order to $90), or jsut get another box and have free shipping.

Im planning on giving out some decks consisting of the massive common card overlap to my friends to pique their interest, and keeping the surpluss NIB jsut in case...
 

Edited by kiwidru

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I also fail to see how this is different from any other non-collectible board or card game.  I could not resell my Sentinels of the Multiverse set for even half much as I paid for it (about 45% of new cost on the secondary market).  My Summoner Wars collection will fetch 35-40% of its "new" price on the secondary market on a good day.  Talisman + expansions is maybe worth 75% of its "new" price (minis help a board game hold a little more secondary market value).

 

LCGs are more of a "board game with lots of expansions" than they are an "investment".  They share a secondary market with other board games, and expecting them to perform differently than the rest of the market would be financially inadvisable.  (Out of Print board games are a different secondary market.  Space Hulk is pretty $$$ now.  If an LCG ever goes out of print - Warhammer:Invasion is the likely first candidate - full playset collections will eventually probably be worth more than the initial cost.)

 

 

You actually answered your own question regarding how the two are different. When you buy a board game, you are done. You have all that you need to play. A "living" game requires just as much purchase attention as buying a collectible game, and there's no singles market. While that's great news for the uber-competitive player who doesn't want to buy $60-80 cards on the secondary market, it means there's also no $5 common deck that is playable from now to the end of time no matter what else gets made. Every LCG purchase is $10-15 unless you are buying a massive lot from a quitter on ebay for a reduced price.

 

When you get into the miniatures side of it, it's even more expensive. You need the cards to play (yes you can copy them if you lack scruples), but you have to buy the ships to get them - even if you don't need the ships. Again, the bidding starts at $10 and only goes up from there.

 

I LOVE Lord of the Rings and X-Wing, and I am really excited about this game but I know the score - I won't be able to recycle funds spent on gaming with these products. Like it or not, it is a fact of the model.

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You actually answered your own question regarding how the two are different. When you buy a board game, you are done. You have all that you need to play. A "living" game requires just as much purchase attention as buying a collectible game, and there's no singles market. While that's great news for the uber-competitive player who doesn't want to buy $60-80 cards on the secondary market, it means there's also no $5 common deck that is playable from now to the end of time no matter what else gets made. Every LCG purchase is $10-15 unless you are buying a massive lot from a quitter on ebay for a reduced price.

 

 

I haven't tried it, but isn't there a LCG equivalent to a $5 dollar deck? like lets say made from just the starter and 1 deluxe expansion? - now i gotta give this a try with Netrunner (jinteki) and Warhammer Invasion (empire)

 

Also when you buy a board game you are done. That's true on the other hand, FF seems to churn out a ton of boardgame expansions. Take Talisman or Mansiosn of madness for example...

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play with friends, not with people who whine they have to buy 3 starters to play at tournaments?

 

Or get friends who whine less?

 

 

I LOVE Lord of the Rings and X-Wing, and I am really excited about this game but I know the score - I won't be able to recycle funds spent on gaming with these products. Like it or not, it is a fact of the model.

 

This varies from game to game.

 

Right now I have spent ~120 dollars on three conquest core sets.

 

At gencon I recieved 2 Blood Angel promos and sold one for 119 dollars on ebay.

 

In this regard I have spent 1 dollar on this game.

 

Should I choose to sell the other card I will now have a return on my investment for warhammer conquest. If I keep playing at these high level events I expect this to continue, even with just the participation prizes.

Edited by KennedyHawk

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