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LordTeague

Specific Homeworld Homebrews

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Sometimes, you just want a particularly notable homeworld. And sometimes, the rules for the generic homeworlds don't quite reflect the character of the specific homeworld you want. Sometimes you may wish to tweak the homeworld choices available to make your homeworld choice truly reflect the planet they're from. This thread is for those homeworlds. 

 

My first foray into the idea of coming up with unique and balanced rulesets for specific planets was for the planet of Medusa. It was listed as a Feral World, but neither the Feral World nor the Death World rules particularly fit with it. So I started chatting with nevertrustasmilingnid, the GM of the game where I used said homeworld rules, to come up with a set of unique and balanced rules for that particular world. I supplied the unique and fluffy rule ideas, he supplied and made sure the rules were balanced. And so that is how it worked for all of the homeworld options I posted below. 

 

I will undoubtedly make more of these over time, but for now, enjoy these six characterful worlds, three of which are Space Marine Homeworlds, three of which are worlds from which Imperial Guard Regiments are drawn. The latter three can most certainly be used to make guardsmen characters in RT, even without the Arch-Militant Class. The former, however, tend to breed characters with impressive signature abilities that are near-impossible to find elsewhere. I have also made a few other Origin Path Options designed to work specifically with Space Marine Homeworlds, balanced by nevertrustasmilingnid as well. 

 

Space Marine Homeworlds: 

Medusa
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Strength, +5 Toughness, -5 Willpower, -5 Fellowship.
Starting Skills: Due to their techno-barbaric nature, Medusans are adept at adapting what they can from the wildly varying levels of technology on their planet. They gain Trade (Technomat) as a starting skill.
Stranger to the Cult: Although Medusans know that the Emperor is their god and saviour, they see the Imperial Creed through the lens of Cult Mechanicus doctrine. As a result, they can be surprisingly—and sometimes dangerously—ignorant of the common teachings and practices of the Ecclesiarchy, often failing to offer its clerics the level of deference they expect. Medusan characters suffer a –10 penalty on Tests involving knowledge of the Imperial Creed and a –5 penalty on Fellowship Tests to interact with members of the Ecclesiarchy in formal settings.
Purge the Weak: The people of Medusa cannot brook any weakness of any kind in their ranks due to the harshly difficult environment they grew up in. Only the strongest survive, and those that are too weak to do so voluntarily give themselves up to the elements to ensure the survival of the rest of their tribe. Because of this, characters from Medusa may add +3 to any stat of their choosing, and add +10 to any test to resist Pinning and Shock. However, this same attitude often keeps them from aiding those who need it most. Characters from Medusa must make a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test to save those that are too weak to save themselves, which can be assisted by a Fellowship Test from another character. If the test fails, the character must leave them to their fate.
Iron Stomach: Food is often scarce on Medusa and those born there learn to set aside their revulsion and eat whatever they must to survive. Characters from Medusa gain a +10 bonus to Carouse Skill Tests made to resist the effects of ingested toxins, poison or tainted foods. This bonus applies to Tests made to consume unusual or unpleasant meals—rotting meat, Grox testes, corpse starch rations, to name a few—as well as Tests made to resist throwing up.
Rite of Passage: Life is harsh for inhabitants of Medusa, and blood spills all too frequently. Whether through surviving a brutal initiation ritual or through tribal teachings, Medusans are adept at tending bleeding wounds. The Explorer may spend a Full Action to make a Challenging (+0) Intelligence Test or an Ordinary (+10) Medicae Test to staunch Blood Loss (see Chapter IX: Playing the Game on page 260). On a success, they manage to stop the bleeding.
Paranoid: The inherently dangerous conditions of a death world encourage distrust and doubt. Medusans tend to be slow to put their faith in anyone other than themselves and chafe against the petty strictures of a more complex society. They suffer a –10 penalty to all Interaction Skill Tests made in formal surroundings.

Chapter Homeworld (Iron Hands)
Starting Wounds: Medusans double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+1 to the result to determine their starting number of wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a Medusan's starting Fate Points. On a 1-4 they start with 1 fate point, on a 5-10 they start with 2 fate points.

 

Medusa may replace Death World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Nocturne
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Strength, +5 Toughness, –5 Willpower, –5 Perception.
Starting Skills: All Nocturneans are adept at resisting the dangers of a hostile environment. Nocturneans gain the Survival Skill. In addition, the importance they place on forging also grants them the Trade (Blacksmith) skill. Finally, due to the Salamanders living amongst the natives in their off time, Nocturneans have picked up quite a bit of knowledge on the Space Marines, and start with Common Lore (Adeptus Astartes).

Trade (Blacksmith): Used to forge primitive weapons made primarily of metal, and can also be used to make works of art through blacksmithing techniques or even to decorate more advanced weaponry.
Starting Gear: Nocturneans may choose to include a Hammer in their starting gear.
Hardened: Nocturneans are accustomed to violence. In addition, Nocturne's nature as a volcanic planet means that it is common for its inhabitants to be well adjusted to the heat. Nocturneans may choose to start one of the following talents: Jaded or Resistance (Heat).
Flamecraft: Nocturneans display a particular affinity for the art of using flame weapons. Nocturneans start with the Flame Weapons Training (Universal) and Cleanse and Purify Talents.
Radiation Exposure: As a result of the constant exposure to high levels of exposure to radioactive rare earth elements often uncovered by extreme volcanism, and the constant volcanic pollution that blocks out their world's sunlight, Nocturneans have developed a very distinct set of mutations (deemed non-heretical by the Ecclesiarchy). They have developed deep black skin and irises that glow red in the darkness because of the ability to see in the infared levels of the electromagnetic spectrum to deal with the darkness. This frightful visage works as a sight-based Disturbing Voice, or in other words a “Disturbing Face”. In addition, their evolved eyesight grants them the Dark Sight Trait. However these mutations are enough of a distinguishing factor that Nocturneans may never benefit nor take the Unremarkable Talent, and instead gain a single Talented talent of their choosing if the Unremarkable Talent is gained during character creation.
Hammer, Forge, and Anvil: These three symbols hold a deep meaning to the members of the Promethean Cult, due to the importance of smithing in Nocturnean Culture. Equally important to the Prometheans is the deeply held value of self-reliance, a trait that has long since defined the people of Nocturne. Nocturneans thus start with Trade (Blacksmith) and gain a +10 bonus to tests to acquire parts for weapons, armor, gear, etc., which they can craft themselves, as well as a +10 bonus to Survival and Trade tests while they are operating self-sufficiently (which may not be claimed if the character is being directly assisted, +10 bonus or not). However, they incur a -10 penalty to acquire already-crafted items of Common or Poor Craftsmanship which they may craft themselves, and do not receive the +10 bonus for acquiring items of Poor Craftsmanship, as they are unused to searching to buy items they can make themselves. Due to their striving for self-sufficiency, the character may have picked up other trade skills as well—thus for 100 EXP, they may also choose one of the following Trade Skills: Armorer, Chymist, Explorator, Linguist, Remembrancer, Scrimshawer, or Technomat.
Serve the People: The other major value that is a defining trait of the Nocturneans is self-sacrifice, one which they deeply believe in. If a Nocturnean encounters a civilian (or in very special cases, soldiers) in need, whatever form that need may take, up to and including the need to escape out of danger, the GM may call upon the player to make a Willpower Test, which may be modified by the significance of the need and the consequences of following through on attempting to fulfill it. If he fails, he must attempt to aid those affected and must make another willpower test to willingly put himself before those in need. If the Nocturnean passes the first test, he may choose not to help those in need of aid, and on passing either test, he may go about it in a manner less likely to put himself in harm's way or inflict significant other costs to himself. The willpower tests can be assisted with a successful fellowship test.
Trail of Fire: Nocturneans hold that only through spiritual meditation and exploration performed alone and in isolation from others can a person gain true understanding of both themselves and how they can best honor the legacy of Vulkan and serve the will of the Emperor. If a Nocturnean fails a Fear or Willpower test by 4 degrees or more, or otherwise have their beliefs significantly shaken, they must embark on such an isolated quest of self-discovery within one game session (or as soon as reasonably possible) or suffer 1d10 insanity points. The difficulties faced on the journey itself should be primarily dealt with abstractly, with one or more Survival tests being made for it, the difficulties of which should be left up to the GM, and other skills called to be tested as needed. As these journeys are typically very dangerous, the GM should not be afraid to wound or even kill the character involved if the rolls were bad enough! Fate points can be burnt to avoid death in said scenarios as normal. If they come back alive, and the quest was not forcibly interrupted (GM's discretion), they do not suffer any Insanity or Corruption penalties caused by the test which they had failed, as they manage to find resolve and clarity through their quest. Additionally if they come back alive, they provide a +25 bonus to any Exploration or Creed Objectives undertaken either at the beginning or the end of their journey.
Survivor: Simply reaching adulthood is an achievement for Nocturneans. Having overcome myriad dangers to achieve this goal means that a hardened Nocturnean is less likely to succumb in the face of new threats. Nocturneans gain a +10 bonus to any test to resist Pinning and Shock.

Chapter Homeworld (Salamanders)
Starting Wounds: Death world characters double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+2 to the result to determine their starting number of Wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a death world character’s starting Fate Points. On a 1–5, he begins with 2 Fate Points; on a 6–10, he begins with 3 Fate Points.

 

Nocturne may replace Death World or Forge World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Fenris:
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Fellowship, +5 Weapon Skill, -5 Ballistics Skill, –5 Willpower.
Starting Skills: All Fenrisians are adept at resisting the dangers of a hostile, aquatic environment. Fenrisians gain the Drive (Watercraft), Secret Tongue (Juvjk), Survival, and Swim Skills.
Starting Gear: All Fenrisians start with an Axe, Sword, or Spear, and Heavy Furs. 
Hardened: Fenrisians are raised within a warrior culture from birth, for that is how they must be raised if they are to survive the ice storms and frigid winters that are common sights on the planet. Fenrisians may choose to start one of the following talents: Jaded or Resistance (Cold).
If It Bleeds, I Can Kill It: Fenris possess beasts that are the most dangerous to human life on any Imperial World, including Catachan, and inhabitants must find any means necessary to combat them if they are to survive. Fenrisians are adept at using weapons commonly found in or fashioned from their environment. Fenrisians gain the Melee Weapon Training (Primitive) Talent .
Beast Hunters: Fenrisians are adept at hunting and tracking down beasts and other prey. They start with Carouse, Tracking, and Wrangling as untrained basic skills, and may purchase all of these skills as trained skills for 200 EXP at character creation. However, they are unused to operating without their sense of smell. They suffer a -5 penalty to Perception Tests while wearing any environmentally sealed armor or voidsuit, or other apparatus which limits their sense of smell.
Reckless Overconfidence: Fenrisians are among some of the boldest and reckless warriors out there, for in some ways such boldness sometimes aids as much with survival as much as it can be considered a drawback. Fenrisians must make a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test to exercise restraint from jumping into the thick of combat. If they fail they gain +1 to their initiative rolls (on the first round of combat?) as they unthinkingly spring into combat with whatever means available without restraint. Of course, such recklessness can have dire consequences.
Warrior Pride: The culture on Fenris means that nearly every inhabitant has their own fierce warrior pride. Such is the strength of this pride that oftentimes Fenrisians will not endure any slight or offense to it. They must take a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test to back down from a slight or direct challenge. In addition, such is the ferocity of this pride that they often seek out the biggest creatures and the most worthy combatants to fight against. They must take a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test to resist seeking glory in engaging such foes in battle, or an Ordinary (+10) Willpower Test to avoid engaging them in melee. Out of combat, the GM may call on the player to take a Routine (+20) Willpower Test to avoid requesting a duel or other show of strength and/or endurance with a worthy opponent. The GM may modify these tests based on the consequences of such pride. However, such exploits make for good bragging rights. Fenrisians gain a +10 bonus to Disposition and/or Interaction tests where bragging of their accomplishments would prove relevant to the situation, with an additional bonus at the discretion of the GM and the other players if the bragging is roleplayed particularly well or if the story is told in a particularly grandiose fashion.
Survivor: Simply reaching adulthood is an achievement for Fenrisians. Having overcome myriad dangers to achieve this goal means that a hardened Fenrisians is less likely to succumb in the face of new threats. Fenrisians gain a +10 bonus to any test to resist Pinning and Shock, and having faced off against a variety of deadly beasts back on their homeworld, also gain a +10 to resist Fear from Beasts only. (Tyranids don't count as beasts.)

Chapter Homeworld (Space Wolves)
Starting Wounds: Fenris characters double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+2 to the result to determine their starting number of Wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a Fenris character’s starting Fate Points. On a 1–5, he begins with 2 Fate Points; on a 6–10, he begins with 3 Fate Points.

 

Fenris may replace Death World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Baal Prime and Secundus
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Strength, +5 Toughness, -5 Willpower, -5 Fellowship.
Starting Skills: All Feral Worlders can converse in their regional tongue, unique to their world of origin. Feral Worlders gain the Speak Language (Tribal Dialect) skill.
Starting Gear: Inhabitants of Baal may start with a Rad Suit, which counts as a Survival Suit that provides an additional +10 to resist the effects of radiation, and a Rad Counter*. The capabilities of the latter are described below. Due to the scavenged nature of their construction, for each item, roll a d10. On a 6 or higher, the item is of Common Quality, on a 5 or lower, the item is of Poor Quality.
Rad Counter: About the size and weight of an auspex, rad counters are designed to detect the presence of harmful radiation. Rad counters alert the wearer when radiation is encountered, coming in a variety of patterns and makes. Although most alert the wearer with simple beeps, the design is simple enough a great many variant designs, both fancy and utilitarian, have been made. Poor craftsmanship models have the bulk of a car battery and weigh 2kg. Good-craftsmanship versions provide more detailed information on the kinds of radiation involved, which may be read with an Ordinary (+10) Tech-Use Test or Challenging (+0) Logic Test. Best-Craftsmanship versions are easier to interpret and are capable of providing even more useful information, providing a +10 bonus to tests to interpret this information, or allowing one to make a Challenging (+0) Literacy Test to read the device. Rad Counters are of Common Availability.
*Note that this is a notably altered version of the Salvation Auger found in Dark Heresy, the Inquisitor's Handbook.
Iron Stomach: Food is often scarce on feral worlds and those born on such worlds learn to set aside their revulsion and eat whatever they must to survive. Feral Worlders gain a +10 bonus to Carouse Skill Tests made to resist the effects of ingested toxins, poison or tainted foods. This bonus applies to Tests made to consume unusual or unpleasant meals—rotting meat, Grox testes, corpse starch rations, to name a few—as well as Tests made to resist throwing up.
Radiation Exposure: The fallout from the ancient weapons deployed on the moons of Baal many millenia ago is an ever-present and dangerous threat, the natives wearing Rad-Suits and carefully monitoring their Rad Counters in an effort to avoid the worst of the radiation. However, the various tribes of Baal have suffered through the radiation differently, some priding themselves a bit too much on their purity, while other tribes are composed largely of mutants. Due to being accustomed to such radiation, inhabitants of Baal gain the Resistance (Radiation) Talent. However, to represent the varying degrees of radiation exposure, either the Pride in Purity or the Irradiated Mutant trait must be selected, listed below.
Pride in Purity: The purer tribes of Baal, miraculously untouched by even the slightest mutations, cannot help but feel a sense of pride in their inherent purity. Their commonplace rituals of weeding out the mutated and disfigured often serve to reinforce this pride, and even if the Explorer struggles to see why such purity is inherently great, they cannot bear to hear it criticized by others. When faced with direct challenges to his biological purity (whether these take the form of mockery, reasoned debate or gentle criticism) the character lashes out at the offenders, often violently. He may take a Willpower Test to suppress these violent urges, modified by the provocation and the consequences (set by the GM) of succumbing to his anger. In addition, so foul to the explorer are the mere sight of mutants that he cannot bear their very presence. All natives of Baal have Hatred (Mutants). However, this hatred is often so strong as to overwhelm reason and sound judgment, and Baal characters may be required, at the GM’s discretion, to take an Ordinary (+10) Willpower Test in order to restrain themselves from attacking without mercy when confronted with mutants.
Irradiated Mutant: On the other side of the spectrum of the natives of Baal are the tribes of mutants, disfigured by the harmful touch of radiation, and banded together as a social unit due to a very limited number of non-mutants being willing to accept them. They must roll once on the Mutations Chart (See Page 369 of the Rogue Trader Core Rulebook), rerolling any results of 75-100. Alternatively they may choose a result on the Mutations Chart from 0-74 for 200 EXP. Additionally, their often appalling and disgusting looks means that many inhabitants of the Imperium look at them with disgust and fear, especially high-class nobles and governors. Except when they are functioning within the underworld or the dregs of society, they suffer a -10 to all Interaction Tests, which may be changed to a +10 for Intimidation Tests at the GM's discretion. When among the higher echelons of society, they suffer an additional -10 to their Interaction Tests, as many nobles do not tolerate the presence of such disgusting filth. These modifiers are halved if the character is wearing opaque full body suits. However, these natives of Baal also find it easier to relate to others of their kind, and gain Peer (Mutants).
Primitive: Feral worlders have no time for the mysteries of technology or the rubbishy constraints of etiquette and social niceties. They take a –10 penalty on Tech-Use (Int) Tests and a –10 penalty to Fellowship Tests made in formal or civilised surroundings.
Rite of Passage: Life is harsh for the inhabitants of Baal, and blood spills all too frequently. Whether through surviving a brutal initiation ritual or through tribal teachings, Baal natives are adept at tending bleeding wounds. The Explorer may spend a Full Action to make a Challenging (+0) Intelligence Test or Ordinary (+10) Medicae Test to staunch Blood Loss (see Chapter IX: Playing the Game on page 260). On a success, they manage to stop the bleeding.
As the failure of one's Rad Suit may prove equally disastrous on Baal Prime and Secundus, they have also proven equally adept at coming up with makeshift patches for their voidsuits. As a full action, the character may spend a Full Action to make a Challenging (+0) Intelligence Test or an Ordinary (+10) Trade (Armorer) Test to patch a breach in any self-contained environment. Success means that the patch holds and the suit counts as sealed once more.
Wilderness Savvy: Feral worlders are accustomed to hunting their own food. Navigation (Surface) (Int), Survival (Int) and Tracking (Int) count as Basic Skills for feral worlders.

Chapter Homeworld (Blood Angels)
Starting Wounds: Feral worlders double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+1 to the result to determine their starting number of wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a Feral Worlder's starting Fate Points. On a 1-4 they start with 1 fate point, on a 5-10 they start with 2 fate points.

 

Baal Prime and Secundus replace Death World on the Origin Path Chart.

Phalanx
Starting Gear: Phalanx characters may start with a charm.
Heroic Determination: Being raised among the fortress monastery of the Imperial Fists has a polarizing effect on its inhabitants. Being amongst the Space Marines of the very chapter known as a beacon of loyalty, the inhabitants of Phalanx are often inspired to emulate the very acts of bravery and loyalty the Imperial Fists themselves accomplish regularly. Characters from Phalanx must make a Difficult (-10) Willpower Test to back down or retreat from a fight, no matter the odds. However, such stubborn heroics mean they are equally unlikely to back down even in the worst situations or up against the scariest foes. They gain a +30 bonus to resist the effects of Fear and Pinning.
Heroic Pride: Being a firm adherent to the same ideals of loyalty and heroism as the Imperial Fists are stalwart exemplars of gives inhabitants of Phalanx more than their fair share of pride. They can hardly tolerate criticism of their heroic nature or ideals. When faced with direct challenges to their heroism or loyalty (whether these take the form of mockery, insinuations of heresy, reasoned debate or gentle criticism) the character reacts violently. He may take a Willpower Test to suppress these violent urges, modified by the provocation and the consequences (set by the GM) of succumbing to his anger. Additionally, the character may only willingly go along with acts of heresy if he both passes the above test (as even merely suggesting he'd go along with such a thing is a trigger) and another Difficult (-10) Willpower Test. This second test may be auto-failed if the player wishes. Failure means the character must do everything they can to try and prevent such heresy from occurring. Success means the character gains 1d10 Insanity Points due to their mind reeling from them going along with something so disloyal and unbecoming of the Imperial Fists, but they may (grudgingly) go along with the act.
Crewmen Classes: There are three major classes of crewmen on Phalanx. There are the ship's crews, the ship's officers, and the serf staff. The last option is best served by taking the Chapter Serf Lure of the Void at character creation. However, due to the differing dynamics between the two, one may choose between being part of the ship's crew or ship's officers at character creation. The ship's crew are represented by the Void Born Homeworld, while the ship's officers are represented by the Battlefleet Homeworld. In either case, one should add the rest of the Phalanx traits to their homeworld profile to represent their unique origin.

Chapter Homeworld (Imperial Fists)

 

Phalanx replaces the option on the Origin Path Chart chosen by Crewman Classes.

 

Macragge:

I have no unique ideas for this. If you want Macragge, just use Macragge Guardsman and choose Shrine World as your base homeworld. 

 

Imperial Guard Homeworlds: 

Note: Anyone from an Imperial Guard Homeworld may take the Imperial Infantryman's Uplifting Primer as part of their starting gear, for what little the book is worth. 

 

Cadia
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Agility or Weapon Skill; +5 Ballistic Skill; +5 Willpower; –5 Intelligence; –5 Fellowship .
Starting Skills: Fortress world characters begin with the Secret Tongue (Military) (Int) and Common Lore (Imperial Guard, Imperium, War) (Int) as trained Skills.
Hated Enemy: Cadia stands on the edge of the Eye of Terror, within the only stable passage out of the massive Warp Storm, and the Cadians are taught to loathe the forces of the Lost and the Damned that frequently venture forth from the hellish daemon worlds within the Eye. All Cadians have Hatred (Servants of Chaos). However, this hatred is often so strong as to overwhelm reason and sound judgement, and Cadian characters may be required, at the GM’s discretion, to take an Ordinary (+10) Willpower Test in order to restrain themselves from attacking without mercy when confronted with Chaos forces.
Constant Combat Training: All fortress world characters begin with Basic Weapon Training (Las or SP), or if they start with Basic Weapon Training (Universal) due to their carreer, gain a +10 to BS tests with Las or SP weapons instead. However, they suffer a –5 penalty on Social Interaction Tests regarding non-combat topics (GM’s discretion).
Bred For War: Cadians possess an entirely justified siege mentality. This is a natural result of daily lives shaped by the need for perpetual vigilance against an enemy that could strike at any time, and the discipline required to respond to that threat swiftly and effectively. Cadians are loyal almost to a fault, and reluctant to disobey orders even with good reason, lacking personal initiative, and becoming inflexible as a result. A Cadian must pass a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test in order to go against the rules and regulations of the Imperial Guard, the Rogue Trader they may now work under, or any order issued by a proper authority.
Steel Nerve: Every day denizens of fortress worlds train with live ammunition and explosives, and are comfortable around weapon’s fire. Fortress world characters gain the Nerves of Steel and Rapid Reload Talents. Additionally, they may purchase the Combat Formation or the Double Team talent at character creation for 200 EXP.
Starting Wounds: Fortress world characters double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+1 to the result to determine their starting wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a fortress world character’s starting Fate Points. On a roll of 1–9, he begins with 3 Fate Points; on a roll of 10, he begins with 4 Fate Points.

 

Cadia may replace Forge World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Catachan
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Strength, +5 Toughness, –5 Willpower, –5 Fellowship
Starting Skills: All Catachans are adept at resisting the dangers of a hostile environment. Catachans gain the Survival and Navigate (Surface) Skills.
Hardened: Catachans are accustomed to violence, the planet containing among the most deadly creatures in the galaxy. Catachans start with the Jaded and Paranoid Talents, and may start with Light Sleeper or Resistance (Poison). For 200 EXP at character creation, they may replace Paranoia with Lightning Reflexes, as such quick reactions are often needed to survive among the deadliest creatures known to mankind!
Illiterate: While Catachans have learned to speak Low Gothic, they do not have time in their violent lives to learn how to read or write the universal language of the Imperium. Because of this, Catachans do not start with the Literacy Skill at creation. The Literacy skill also counts as an elite advance for Catachans, regardless of whether they have it available in their advance scheme.
Survivalists (Jungle): Catachans have grown up fighting in the lethal jungle of their homeworld, and feel at home on any planet with a similar environment. When operating in jungle terrain, they can re-roll failed Survival and Navigate (Surface) Skill Tests.
If It Bleeds, I Can Kill It: Catachan possess plants and beasts among the most utterly hostile to human life, and inhabitants must find any means necessary to combat them if they are to survive. Death worlders are adept at using weapons commonly found in or fashioned from their environment. Death worlders gain the Melee Weapon Training (Primitive) Talent.
Wary of Outsiders: Catachans tend to be slow to put their faith in anyone other than themselves and their comrades, and they chafe at the expectations and strictures of more civilised society. They suffer a –10 penalty on all Interaction Skill Tests made in formal surroundings, and similarly impose a –10 penalty on any Interaction Skill Tests made on them by any non-Catachans. These penalties can be waived at the GM’s discretion, if the death worlders are dealing with those who have earned their trust.
Survivor: Simply reaching adulthood is an achievement for Catachans. Having overcome myriad dangers to achieve this goal means that a hardened death worlder is less likely to succumb in the face of new threats. Catachans gain a +10 bonus to any test to resist Pinning, Fear, and Shock.
Starting Wounds: Catachan characters double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+2 to the result to determine their starting number of Wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a Catachan's starting Fate Points. On a 1–5, he begins with 2 Fate Points; on a 6–10, he begins with 3 Fate Points.

 

Catachan may replace Death World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Krieg:
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Toughness, +5 Willpower, –5 Fellowship, -5 Perception
Starting Skills: All Kriegers are adept at resisting the dangers of a hostile environment. Kriegers gain the Survival Skill.
Starting Gear: All Kriegers start with their signature gas mask (which counts as a respirator), which they are known for wearing around nearly everywhere.
Hardened: Despite its status as a Death World whose inhabitants stay in underground bunkers to stay alive against the radioactive fallout that still exist above, nearly the entire population of Krieg are trained to be hardened soldiers. Kriegers may choose to start one of the following talents: Jaded or Resistance (Radiation).
Steel Nerve: The entire population and purpose of Krieg has been given solely to the purpose of churning out soldiers, and the ammunition and weapons to equip them. Krieg characters gain the Nerves of Steel Talent, as well as either the Orthopoxy or Unshakeable Faith Talent.
Wary of Outsiders: Kriegers tend to be slow to put their faith in anyone but their comrades. They suffer a -10 penalty on any Interaction Skills made on them by any non-Kriegers. This penalty can be waived at the GM's discretion, if the Kriegers are dealing with those who earned their trust.
Only One Life to Give: So driven to martyrdom are the Krieg, that it can cause them to take unnecessary risks, lamenting that they can only sacrifice themselves once. Krieg characters must pass an Ordinary (+10) Willpower Test in order to retreat from combat or otherwise act in the interests of self-preservation.
Faceless, Nameless, and Selfless: Krieg characters are taught to regard themselves without identity, hidden behind gas masks and stripped of even their names. This lack of self helps them fight on against impossible odds, and neither fear nor doubt will hinder them. When required to make a Fear or Pinning Test, ignore all penalties applied to the Test, and simply treat it as a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test.
Starting Wounds: Krieger characters double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+2 to the result to determine their starting number of Wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a Krieg character’s starting Fate Points. On a 1–5, he begins with 2 Fate Points; on a 6–10, he begins with 3 Fate Points.

 

Krieg may replace Death World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Elysia
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Ballistics Skill, -5 Fellowship.
Starting Gear: Due to the following items being standard fare for fighting pirates (and the drop tactics the Elysians are known for), the character may take a rebreather, survival suit, and/or grav chute as part of their standard gear.
Blessed Ignorance: Elysians know that the proper ways of living are those tried and tested by the generations that have gone before. Horror, pain, and death are the just rewards of curiosity, for those that look too deeply into the mysteries of the universe are all too likely to find malefic beings looking back at them. Their wise blindness imposes a –5 penalty on Forbidden Lore (Int) Tests.
Hated Enemy: Elysia rests in the middle of a major trade route, with plenty of asteroid fields and dense gas clouds to provide camoflague to pirate ships—very notoriously known as havens for human and Eldar pirates. Because of being trained to dispatch such pirates on sight, all Elysians have Hatred (Pirates). However, this hatred is often so strong as to overwhelm reason and sound judgement, and Elysian characters may be required, at the GM’s discretion, to take an Ordinary (+10) Willpower Test in order to restrain themselves from attacking without mercy when confronted with Pirates.
Anti-Pirate Operations: Due to having plenty of experience dispatching pirates, both in the PDF and in the Imperial Guard, Elysians are adept at ship-to-ship combat and serving alongside naval support when assaulting isolated space-based pirate outposts. Elysians gain Pilot (Personal), Pilot (Flyer), and Pilot (Spacecraft) as untrained basic skills. Each pilot skill may be upgraded to a Trained Skill at 200 EXP each at character creation only—unless the character's career can take them later on. They may also purchase Catfall for 200 EXP at any point.
Reckless Overconfidence: It takes a special kind of person to drop—quite literally—into combat. Elysia produces a rather disproportionately large number of these kind of people, a number that is concentrated within their PDF and Imperial Guard regiments due to nearly all of them volunteering to join said forces. Elysians must make an Challenging (+0) Willpower Test  in order to avoid jumping into—metaphorically or literally—a situation without properly evaluating the circumstances first.
Hagiography: Widespread scriptures describing the lives—and, more importantly, the deaths—of the Emperor’s blessed saints and warmasters, and the sequence of endless wars, crusades, and terrors that make up history, grant Imperial citizens a comparatively wide knowledge of the Imperium of Man. Imperial worlders gain Common Lore (Imperial Creed) (Int), Common Lore (Imperium) (Int), and Common Lore (War) (Int) as untrained Basic Skills.
Liturgical Familiarity: Surrounded as they are by the zealous and the faithful, Imperial citizens are accustomed to the tutelage of the Ecclesiarchy. Imperial world characters gain Literacy (Int) and Speak Language (High Gothic) (Int) as untrained Basic Skills.
Starting Wounds: Elysia characters double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5 to the result to determine their starting number of Wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine an Elysian’s starting Fate Points. On a 1–8, he begins with 3 Fate Points; on a 9–10, he begins with 4 Fate Points.

 

Elysia may replace Imperial World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Ultramar Guardsman
Starting Skills: Trained in the scriptures of the codex by the Ultramarines themselves, Ultramar Guardsmen are more familiar with both than most servants of the Imperium. They start with Common Lore (Adeptus Astartes) and Scholastic Lore (Codex Astartes).
Starting Gear: All Ultramar Guardsmen begin with a copy of a small portion of the Codex Astartes. This may be in either book or dataslate form. If there is enough time to review and look through the pages of the codex (at the very least a full action) the character gains an additional +10 to Scholastic Lore (Codex Astartes) tests.
Follow the Codex: Guardsmen of Ultramar are raised under the guiding hand of the Ultramarines themselves, and as such they often share the Ultramarine's same adherence to the Codex. These guardsmen may test Scholastic Lore (Codex Astartes) as a free action during any combat situation to get an idea of what the codex would recommend in the current situation. If they succeed, useful suggestions as to what should be done should be given. Failure gives less-than-useful information, misleading information, or the character simply cannot recall anything dealing with this particular situation. Any failure by four degrees or more, or on a roll of 96-100, means the character reacts as if this is a situation not covered by the codex. In addition to such dramatic failures, the GM may decide that certain situations are so odd or bizzare that the Codex simply does not cover them, although this should only be used sparingly. In either case, the explorer takes -10 to all tests until they are in a more familiar situation as their brain struggles to cope. The Guardsmen of Ultramar must also make a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test to go against the tenets and scriptures of the Codex.
Myriad Worlds: The Guardsmen of Ultramar are recruited from an entire subsector of worlds. They may take all the benefits and drawbacks of any one non-specific homeworld and add the effects of Ultramar Guardsmen to them. (Let's just say I wish not to overcomplicate this.)
Proud to Serve: Being able to both honestly state that they have had the honor of serving under the Ultramarines, and the worlds within Ultramar generally seeing this as a great honor as well, the Guardsmen of Ultramar are generally more inclined to continue to fight when most would've faltered, in order to achieve the honors they believe to be expected of them. They get a +10 to resist Fear and Pinning. However, any critical failure on a Fear or Pinning roll, a critical failure on Intelligence tests directly related to combat, or ordinary failures that have extraordinary consequences, both remove these bonuses and inflicts a -5 penalty to Willpower until they can spend an hour to check over the codex as a method of both figuring out what they could've done better and a form of coping.
Ultramarine Recruits: The Ultramarines are unusual among Space Marine Chapters not only in that they recruit from an entire subsector of planets, but also in that even though the planets they recruit from are not required to give soldiers to Imperial Guard regiments, they maintain an incredible number of them anyways. The imperial reforms enacted by Roboute Gulliman and Ultramar's own citizens ensure they remain disciplined, productive, and loyal, making Ultramar a wealthy stellar empire that knows little unrest and no rebellion or heresy. This unique distinction is what allows Ultramar to maintain both Space Marine Recruits and Imperial Guard regiments, and because of this, any Ultramar Guardsman may take the Space Marine Origin Path Options, with their 'homeworld' chapter being the Ultramarines.

 

Ultramar Guardsman takes the spot in the Origin Path chart of the homeworld option chosen by Myriad Worlds.

 

Other Homeworlds:

Mars
Characteristic Modifiers: –5 Any One Stat, +5 Intelligence
Starting Skills: Common Lore (Adeptus Mechanicus, Machine Cult, Tech) (Int), Speak (Techna-Lingua), and Tech-Use are trained skills for Mars Characters.
Credo Omnissiah: Rather than being fully indoctrinated into the Imperial Cult, even the lowliest member of Mars' society is brought up to properly venerate the spirits of the machine and taught the basic rites of tech-propitiation. All Mars characters begin with the Technical Knock Talent.
Perfected For Purpose: Mars inhabitants are tested, indoctrinated, and trained from birth for their chosen station and role in life, much more so than that of other forge worlds, for on Mars, more is both demanded and expected of them. Weakness is not tolerated, and failure brings painful incentives to do better, or in the worst cases, even death. Even those who follow an errant path must strive to be better than their peers to survive as anything but a mere servitor. Because of this, a starting Mars character may increase any two Characteristics of his choice by +3, or a single Characteristic for +5. For 200 EXP at character creation, the character may also boost another characteristic of his choice by +5. They also start with a single Common Quality Cybernetic, which may have its quality boosted from Common to Good Craftsmanship for 200 EXP, or from Good to Best-Craftsmanship for another 200 EXP (bringing the total cost up to 400). This cybernetic may only be upgraded in this way at character creation. Alternatively, if the character is an Explorator, they may exchange this extra common quality cybernetic so that one of their starting ones automatically starts at Best Craftsmanship for no additional cost, at character creation only.
Mechanicus Supplicant: Even if you struggle yourself with the inherent contradictions of your faith, or have cast it aside, you cannot bear to hear it criticized by others. When faced with direct challenges to the underlying tenets of the Cult Mechanicus faith (whether these take the form of mockery, reasoned debate, gentle criticism, or insistence on the more traditional worship of the God Emperor) the character lashes out. He may take a Willpower Test to suppress these violent urges, modified by the provocation and the consequences (set by the GM) of succumbing to his anger. If he fails, he may take another willpower test to avoid unleashing his full fury, and instead express his hate in a 'rational' and 'logical' way—although an undertone of scorn should definitely be apparent, as the character spews out their thoughts in a rant-like fashion.
Outsider to the Cult: Although Mars citizens know that the Emperor is their god and saviour, they see the Imperial Creed strongly through the lens of Cult Mechanicus doctrine. As a result, they can are often dangerously ignorant of the common teachings and practices of the Ecclesiarchy, often failing to offer its clerics the level of deference they expect. Mars characters suffer a –20 penalty on Tests involving knowledge of the Imperial Creed and a –10 penalty on Fellowship Tests to interact with members of the Ecclesiarchy in formal settings.
Jealousy: There are many who would wish to covet the talents and skills of someone raised on Mars for themselves, or if they can't have that, keep anyone else from owning such a prize. Even the protection of a Rogue Trader’s mission merely forces those who wish to have you for themselves to be a bit more cautious and subtle in attempting to 'obtain' their prize or deny such to the Rogue Trader. As a result, starting Martians have powerful enemies. The details of these enemies are left to the player and the Game Master to define, working together to create a formidable threat. Whilst they do not dog the character’s steps at every turn, these enemies aim to inconvenience, harm, or kill him whenever he crosses their path. The Mars character, of course, is free to return the favor when it’s expedient to do so.

Unseen Enemy: This character has an enemy who covets their position, their wealth, or their ship. The Martian has no idea who this person is, or the fact that they’re coming for them. The GM determines this foe and is free to reveal this enemy at any given time. The character gains the Enemy Talent; the group is this unseen foe.
Starting Wounds: Mars characters double their starting Toughness Bonus and add 1d5+1 to the result to determine their starting number of Wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Roll 1d10 to determine a Mars character’s starting Fate Points. On a 1–5, he begins with 2 Fate Points; on a 6–9, he begins with 3 Fate Points; on a 10, he begins with 4 Fate Points.

 

Mars may replace Forge World on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Holy Terra
Characteristic Modifiers: +5 Fellowship or Willpower, -5 Perception. 
Starting Skills: The Terran character begins with Common Lore (Imperial Creed), Literacy (Int), and Speak (High Gothic) as trained Skills.
Class Divide: There are two major kinds of citizens that live on Holy Terra, the high class nobles that do a great many things to keep the Imperium as a whole running, and the lower-classes, along with the great many pilgrims that have undertaken a pilgrimage to Holy Terra. As a result of this, characters from Holy Terra may choose to have the Hagiography and Liturgical Familiarity Traits from the Imperial World Homeworld Option, to represent the lower classes and the pilgrims, or the Etiquette and Supremely Connected Traits from the Noble Born Homeworld Option, to represent the higher echelons of Terran Society.
Those from each class are above and beyond most of those on similar worlds, however. Characters who choose Imperial World as their base world gain the Pure Faith Talent and a single talent from Armor of Contempt, Orthoproxy, or Unshakable Faith. They may exchange a fate point for a blessing at character creation (Blessed Radiance, Divine Minstration, Purge the Unclean, The Emperor Protects, or Wrath of the Righteous)—however they must have at least one fate point remaining at the end of character creation, and cannot at any point go into the negatives.
Characters from Terra who choose Noble Born as their base world may choose between gaining the Extreme Wealth talent, which gives them a +10 to acquisition rolls due to the sheer amount of money they have, or add 5 to the group's starting profit factor.
Exemplar of the Emperor: As if it were by them merely being in such proximity to the radiant presence and divine greatness of the Emperor for so long, Terrans who leave their home planet seem fated for greatness. It is almost as if the Emperor's greatness has rubbed off on them! Whenever the character accomplishes some notable feat (such as dealing the final blow to a feared enemy or daemon, negotiating a deal that seemed near-impossible to accomplish at the outset, etc.), or for particularly notable uses of fate points, they have the chance to gain the Emperor's favor, on the roll of a 9 on a 1d10. The GM may increase this to a roll of a 9 or a 10 on a 1d10, if the deed is particularly distinctive. If the character did not use a fate point to achieve such an accomplishment and manages to succeed on this roll, they gain a temporary fate point, or regain a previously spent fate point (if any). If they spent a fate point, they receive the effects of using the fate point but count as not having spent it. If they burnt a fate point, they count as having spent the fate point instead. If the character does something incredibly deserving of the Emperor's favor, the GM may instead decide to grant a permanent fate point as normal.
The Power of Hate: Throughout your formative years, you spent much of your time within the halls of grand cathedrals. You may have listened in rapt attention to preachers screaming out their abhorrence of the heretic and now you cannot shake the negative connotations of their sermons even if you wanted to. You may have spent your childhood gazing up at the face of the Emperor, in the form of one of the myriad colossi scattered across your home planet. This experience, has created a powerful impression upon you, forging a personal relationship with the God-Emperor that you have retained your whole life. The character gains the Hatred (Heretics) Talent or the Pure Faith Talent.
Shadow of the Emperor: Having lived on the very same planet where the Emperor resides on the Golden Throne has a profound effect on one's religious beliefs. Even if you struggle yourself with the inherent contradictions of your faith, or have cast it aside, you hardly tolerate 'lesser' servants of the Imperium criticizing your beliefs. When faced with direct challenges to the underlying tenets of the Imperial faith (whether these take the form of mockery, reasoned debate or gentle criticism) the character reacts violently. He may take a Willpower Test to suppress these violent urges, modified by the provocation and the consequences (set by the GM) of succumbing to his anger.
His Finest Warriors: The Imperial Fists have the unique distinction of technically having Holy Terra as one of the many homeworlds they recruit from. Characters from Terra may thus choose the Space Marine Origin Path options freely with the Imperial Fists as their homeworld chapter.
Herald of Greatness: Such is the reputation of those from Terra that even in their everyday activities, people expect something great to happen, or they otherwise attract such undue attention. While few would harm such a privileged member of Imperial Society, due to the wrath that would be brought down upon them if they did, the Terran's reputation brings a great many minor hassles upon them, as well as making otherwise ordinary hassles more troublesome. In addition, some people may wish not to associate themselves with the character, due to the attraction the Terran would bring to them by association.
Unseen Enemy: This character has an enemy who covets their position, their wealth, or their ship. The Terran has no idea who this person is, or the fact that they’re coming for them. The GM determines this foe and is free to reveal this enemy at any given time. The character gains the Enemy Talent; the group is this unseen foe.
Starting Wounds: The Terran doubles his starting Toughness Bonus and adds 1d5 to the result to determine their starting number of Wounds.
Starting Fate Points: Terran Characters roll their starting fate points in the same fashion characters from the world chosen by Class Divide would.

 

Holy Terra may replace the base world type chosen by Class Divide on the Origin Path Chart.

 

Space Marine Related Origin Path Options

Important Note

Unless otherwise specified, in all cases the character's homeworld must make sense with and match the homeworld of the Space Marine Chapter involved. For chapters with homeworlds that have specific rules, either the specific homeworld of that chapter, or the closest appropriate normal homeworld available, may be taken to use one of these options with that chapter. If the chapter is fleet based (or recruits from multiple worlds like the Ultramarines do), the character may have any relevant recruitment world. If Peer is taken with the same Space Marine chapter twice, it instead is upgraded to Good Reputation for that chapter instead of offering Talented in a particular skill. Further overlaps instead give the character the Talented talent for a single skill. In addition, so extraordinary are these options, that they may replace any option on the Origin Path Chart. 

 

Unless it is specified within one of these options that you can choose a Chapter that is not tied to what homeworld you have, Guardsmen Homeworlds may not be used with that option. After all, Space Marine Recruitment Worlds are generally not Guardsmen Recruitment Worlds, and vice versa. 

 

I'll be honest, the primary reason the above paragraphs exist is so that your player's choices regarding these make sense with the fluff. To put it simply: GMs and Players are encouraged to exercise common sense and reference one of the 40k wikis if they use these options. 

 

Birthright:
Marine Born: Either born from a Marine prior to his induction in the Space Marines, or being one of the exceedingly rare individuals to be born from a space marine post-conversion, the explorer can nonetheless rightfully claim their space marine heritage, something extraordinary anywhere in the Imperium. The Explorer gains Peer with the Space Marine Chapter of which their father is from, and an Adeptus Astartes Bolt Casing, which counts as a charm and gives +5 to willpower tests to avoid pinning and fear.

Note: If the GM feels this option contradicts the lore of 40k too much, or is personally discomfortable with this option, he may bar this option from being used. 

 

Lure of the Void:
Chapter Serf: In the majority of space marine chapters, those who do not manage to fully pass the initiation process, yet still manage to come out alive, are inducted as chapter serfs. Here, they enjoy a better and more educated life than most servants of the Imperium, as well as the protection and familiarity with the chapter that hosts them. As such they have Peer with a single space marine chapter, Secret Tongue (Chapter Runes), Literacy, Common Lore (Adeptus Astartes), and Speak Language (High Gothic), along with an appropriate set of clothes fit for a serf of that particular chapter.
Cost: 200 EXP.

Provided the players have the appropriate Deathwatch books, an explorer who takes this option may take the initial bonuses for being a marine of that chapter for an additional 200 EXP at character creation. This represents the serf being indoctrinated into the teachings of the chapter (in the least complicated mechanical way possible).

 

If Marine Born is taken, the Chapter Surf's Peer Talent must be put towards the same chapter.

 

Chapter Serfs and Rogue Trader:
Ideally, there already should be some form of connection between the Space Marine Chapter involved and the Rogue Trader. After all, while not as much of a honor as sending a marine or two over to aid the Rogue Trader, sending over a Chapter Serf to an outsider is still very much a honor that is not given away lightly! Thus, the GM must consider the resources and reputation of the Rogue Trader carefully before allowing a player to take the Chapter Serf option. If the Rogue Trader or a crewmate has Peer with the same chapter of Space Marines, or if they have done some great deed for the chapter in the past, the serf may very well be considered a gift from the chapter, and the serf may prove able to call upon the chapter for aid if need be. However, if such a connection does not exist, and the GM is willing to allow such a player into the campaign still, the GM should invent some other reason or motive for the Chapter to have sent the serf—one which puts some sort of expectations from the chapter onto the Rogue Trader that they must fulfill or incur the wrath of said chapter.

 

Ideally the GM should use the Space Marine Chapter involved as both an important plot element and another faction with which the Rogue Trader will have to contend. After all, the Space Marines undoubtedly must have some sort of high expectations for the Rogue Trader, and they are just as hard to negotiate with, if not harder, than other Imperial factions.

 

Chapter Serfs and Deathwatch: 
This Lure of the Void option works excellently for taking Rogue Trader characters into Deathwatch. Unlike making a RT character with this option for RT, RT characters with this option for Deathwatch make more sense, and thus the Lure of the Void option becomes the reason they're serving with the Deathwatch, as there are plenty of reasons to be found as to why the Deathwatch may employ a Chapter Serf.

 

Additionally if a Chapter Serf is taken within Deathwatch, they may take options from their chapter's Chapter Advance Chart. On a roll of a 9 on a 1d10, the Chapter Serf may also benefit from his Chapter's Demeanor instead of spending a fate point—on any other roll a fate point is spent instead. If the Chapter Serf already gets the roll on the 1d10 to keep their fate points, they also get to keep it when they roll a 10. Demeanors can still only be used once per game session. 

 

For purposes of requisition, any starting gear the Chapter Serf has counts as their standard issue equipment, and they gain a bonus 10 Requisition Points per mission due to generally being weaker than Space Marines. They do not gain the bonuses of Squad and Solo Mode abilities, but never affect Cohesion. Additionally, players who play Chapter Serfs in Deathwatch should expect their characters to die a lot. 

 

Trails and Travails:
Aided the Chapter: While the Space Marines are capable of combat prowess far beyond that of normal humans, there are still tasks that for one reason or another, are deemed too 'trivial' to spare a space marine, require skills that Space Marines typically lack, or for which a Space Marine is too obvious and would actually make the mission much harder. These, and any number of other myriad scenarios, are the very sorts of missions that a Space Marine Chapter may request the aid of a 'lowly' human for. Whatever the mission, it was filled with danger, and somehow, miraculously and much to your glory, you managed to come out of it alive. By accomplishing this you have earned the respect of the chapter involved, although with that respect has also come their own expectations for you.
Honored and Rewarded: The character starts with Peer with any one Adeptus Astartes chapter. This can be any chapter, however if the player character already has Peer or Good Reputation with an existing Space Marine Chapter, the GM may mandate that they must choose that chapter instead of a different one (or gain a single Talented Talent instead). The explorer also gains a single skill of their choosing, representing the chapter rewarding the explorer with the honor of training with the Space Marines. In addition, if the player has the appropriate Deathwatch Books, they may purchase a single skill or talent (provided it exists in Rogue Trader*) from the advance scheme of the chapter which they have aided at character creation. 

 

*This restriction can be waived if the character is a Rogue Trader character made to be run in Deathwatch, so long as the choice makes logical sense. At the GM's discretion, he may allow the Tactics Skill to be purchased despite this restriction, which should be treated as a Lore skill that applies specifically to combat situations.

 

Depending on the skill(s) chosen, pick one of the below drawbacks:
Sworn to Secrecy: Most chapter keep their techniques a secret and are reluctant to let others analyze them. The skill(s) (and the skill boosted by the Talented Talent, if any) gained from this Trails and Travails cannot benefit from Assistance (see page 232 of the Rogue Trader Core Rulebook) nor can it be used to aid another unless the other party is a loyalist Astartes.
High Expectations: The honor the explorer has earned has also placed great expectations on the character, expectations he is honor-bound to fulfill lest he know the scorn of his chapter and the guilt of failing humanity's finest warriors. If, for any reason, the explorer has failed in the eyes of the chapter, the character takes a temporary 1d10 Characteristic Damage in a single characteristic the GM feels is appropriate as the explorer's guilt (and the chapter's scorn) weighs down on him. If the character has Good Reputation with that Space Marine Chapter, either 2d10 temporary Characteristic Damage should be inflicted on a single stat, or two stats should receive 1d10 temporary Characteristic Damage, the stats being determined by the GM's discretion. 

 

Suggestions, Constructive Criticism, and other Homeworld Ideas welcome. 

Edited by LordTeague

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My only real criticism is the Marine Born option - in all my years ive not come across anything canon to confirm that Astartes can breed. And for one to have bred before being inducted into a chapter he would have to have been siring progeny as soon as he hit puberty, cause Astartes recruits tend to be boys between the ages of 10 and 14. Whilst some planets may consider their males 'adults' at this age i can't see many being so.
 

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Due to an unfortunate circumstance involving mind switching, psychic power abuse, and my Rogue Trader immediately executing an original body, our Seneschal has recently had his mind transplanted into a Space Marine. After a pause, I decided to run with it because... okay. The player was new to the setting but had clearly been having fun roleplaying his character, so I thought it would be safe enough. We paused for dinner, and for everyone to catch their breath, whereupon we went over all of his improved senses and abilities from being transplanted into a Space Marine body.

 

I then calmly informed him that despite no official ruling I could find, I was saying through GM fiat that he no longer had any reproductive organs. He was crestfallen.

 

I think it's absolutely open to interpretation, but I think even the small amount of energy necessary to keep a reproductive system action would be seen as meaningless, and those hormones to stimulate a desire for mating could be better spent simulating a desire to SERVE THE EMPRAH.

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My only real criticism is the Marine Born option - in all my years ive not come across anything canon to confirm that Astartes can breed. And for one to have bred before being inducted into a chapter he would have to have been siring progeny as soon as he hit puberty, cause Astartes recruits tend to be boys between the ages of 10 and 14. Whilst some planets may consider their males 'adults' at this age i can't see many being so.

 

I included that knowing full well such an issue would be controversial, mainly because one of my characters did indeed use it. And it's because of this controversy I ended up creating the Aided the Chapter trails and travails, so that there are other ways to get Good Reputation with a chapter of Space Marines. The description also gives players the option to say the sex that eventually lead to their mother producing a baby occurred before the father got recruited. Also, you can have the lore surrounding the Marine Born option represent something similar to that of Aided the Chapter instead.

 

Or, for the sake of the argument, if the GM doesn't feel it represents the lore well, he can bar others from choosing that birthright option. This has been edited onto that option as a note. Let's keep the marines breeding discussion to a different thread which deals specifically with that, shall we?

 

Also, I would like to mention a few edits I made as well as upcoming worlds that are undoubtedly going to be added sometime soon, once I compile enough of them.

For Krieg, at the suggestion of someone who particularly liked the kriegers, I changed the -5 penalty for Intelligence to a -5 penalty for Perception, as it used to be a place of knowledge and learning in the Imperium.

 

For Medusa (and you guys can use this for any feral world since that trait was copied and pasted straight from there), I modified the Rite of Passage Trait to allow one to make an Ordinary (+10) Medicae Test in place of the Challenging (+0) Intelligence test. I felt that just in case one had medicae, doing that should be easier.

 

I also added some additional information for how to run Chapter Serfs in Deathwatch. The most significant thing is that they get extra requisition points per mission, because they're, you know, human. 

 

Finally, for upcoming worlds, you can expect Ultramar Guardsman, Mars, Baal Prime and Secundus, and Phalanx for sure. Holy Terra, Macragge (I really need ideas for that one), and likely more guardsman worlds (at least Catachan) are likely choices for the second round of additional worlds as well. There will be a third category for Other Specific Homeworlds. 

Edited by LordTeague

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I have some ideas for Macragge.

 

Characteristic Modifiers: +5 WP, +5 Fel, -5 Per, -5 Int

Starting Skills: Citizens of Macragge and the Ultramar System in general are incredibly well-read and educated, having been raised on the ancient histories of the Imperium. Additionally, the Fortress of Hera is the second most popular pilgrimage site in the Imperium, second only to Holy Terra. As such, characters hailing from Macragge start play with the Scholastic Lore (Legend), Scholastic Lore (History), and Speak Language (High Gothic) Skills.

Starting Gear: Book of Prayers.

Born into Silver: Characters born on Macragge are privy to the most wondrous architectures of the Imperium, living on a world free of the famine, blight, pollution, and corruption that plague other worlds, along from benefitting from the political and administrative systems devised by Guilliman himself. Characters gain the Scholastic Lore (Bureaucracy) Talent, but suffer a -5 Penalty to all Forbidden Lore Tests and Common Lore (Imperium) Tests, being unaware of the true suffering that plagues the rest of the galaxy.

Scions Ultra: It is from the world of Macragge that the Ultramarines gain many of their recruits, and while strength, zeal and courage are valued as they are in all chapters, the Ultramarines above all seek tactical, shrewd strategists with whom their Codex Astartes is easily compatible. Also, the constant exposure to the Ultramarines, given their direct rulership of the world, has rubbed off on the populace. Characters from Macragge gain the Tactica Imperialis Skill, and treat Scholastic Lore (Adeptus Astartes, Codex Astartes) as being Basic Skills.

 

Just some ideas.

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I have added more homeworld options. But I'm kinda at the point I don't feel like working on this much more. 

 

So yeah, probably won't see much more of this from me. I feel like the above's a good idea, though!

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