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Kcall07

Does anybody else miss power cards?

34 posts in this topic

Look who's back.

 

I'm going to interpret this as a positive expression in your minimalist style :)

Thanks for noticing I was away for a while and that I came back. These little things are nice.

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Look who's back.

We all know Rapier is you.  Remember we figured it out?

 

 

Are the same guy, sure. But he is not aware of it. ^^ HIs identity changes for moments...

 

Joke :lol:

Edited by Mndela

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Look who's back.

We all know Rapier is you.  Remember we figured it out?

 

 

Are the same guy, sure. But he is not aware of it. ^^ HIs identity changes for moments...

 

Joke :lol:

 

 

Didn't you used to have an elf for an avatar? I like that bird.

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TLDR: The Fall of Gil-Galad can be pretty awesome. For most things, power is relative to the power of the encounter deck. Power cards are being replaced by combinations, which is more interesting, healthy for the game, and prevents encounter decks from having to get even more powerful more quickly.
 

The biggest shame isn't the lack of power cards, it's the existence of useless cards. It's almost like they weren't playtested.
 
For instance, the The Fall of Gil-Galad card is absolute rubbish. No good player is putting that in their deck and to add insult to injury they put 3 in the pack and you can only use one in a deck. Ridiculous.

 
The Fall of Gil-Galad isn't a bad card. At all. People over-think this too much. I just played a 2-player game: Tactics/Leadership and Spirit/Lore. I had a few different songs in the S/L deck so I also added Rivendell Minstrel and The Fall of Gil-Galad. During the game, Rivendell Minstrel was quite helpful in retrieving this particular attachment. I had a Song of Earendil attached to a hero, but I wasn't able to use it because both decks had threat climbing pretty high.
 
The T/L deck had an Eagles of the Misty Mountains out and had just gotten Landroval out via Elf-Stone (yay! No paying 5 resources just to for his ability!). I also happen to have Eomer and Prince Imrahil who take quite a fancy to characters leaving play.
 
The S/L deck had just reset its threat (via Lore Aragorn) back down 28 (from mid 40's) in the previous refresh phase. Then, during combat, I let Aragorn - who was the bearer of The Fall of Gil-Galad - die to an undefended attack. Also, one of my heroes was holding a Horn of Gondor. So I lowered my threat by 12 more: down to 16, gained a resource via Horn of Gondor, boosted Eomer, readied Prince Imrahil, and gained a victory point, then had Landroval leave play, bring Aragorn back, boosting my Eagles of the Misty Mountains, gaining me another resource, and giving me my Aragorn back in a ready state. Also, I am now able to start using Song of Earendil for every threat gain (plus a Galadhrim's Greeting) to bring the T/L deck back below 40, where it safely stayed for the rest of the game.
 
I definitely don't see this combination happening every game, but if I can get even just the most important parts (The Fall of Gil-Galad and Landroval) set up once every couple games, this card can be pretty powerful. In this instance, I could have done the exact same thing, except without gaining the victory point or lowering my threat by 12 if The Fall of Gil-Galad wasn't included in the mix, which is still a very powerful combination of effects. But I DID have The Fall of Gil-Galad, which lowered my threat by 12 for a single resource.
 
Soo... in what way is The Fall of Gil-Galad a bad card? If it weren't for its restrictive trigger, I'd call it a power card.
 
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Also, since we're talking about power cards in this thread, I'll mention that I'm really enjoying the way cards are shaping up. If a single card being added to your deck would ALWAYS make your deck better (as long as you have matching spheres), then that isn't a power card; That's a broken card. If the card's costs/restrictions don't measure up to what you gain from it, then it is overpowered.
 
Before I go much further I want to mention that it's interesting to note that when it comes to stats - particularly attack and defense - the power of the encounter cards you are playing against is the most important factor in what is considered to be "powerful" or "weak". With the way the card pool has grown, enemies have gotten stronger, so having 2 defense is practically pointless now whereas it was actually doable to use a guy with 2 defense in the early days for a good chunk of defending. The old "power cards" are still very powerful because their power isn't relative to the power of the encounter deck. There are some power cards that are graded relative to the power of the deck, but they actually get stronger when the encounter deck gets strong (specifically cancellation and prevention [A Test of Will, A Burning Brand, Hasty Stroke, Feint, Forest Snare]).
 
Today, though, we can't just release a hero with 5 base attack and only 8 starting threat (even though it is feasible with the right stat distribution) because then we'd end up with a hero similar to Glorfindel. The low threat combined with at least one great stat makes him too good to leave out of decks, which railroads deckbuilding (though people who can play more often have more flexibility and time to experiment with alternatives, but people who can only play once in a while pretty much are required to take the best cards because they won't have time to "waste" on a botched experiment). Eomer and Beorn have 5 attack, so what's the big deal? Well, Beorn can't have attachments, so he's stuck at 5. Eomer needs a trigger in order to get up to 5. Also, they both have starting threat values that are good indicators of their power. Going back to the point of Beorn not being able to have attachments: this is how "power cards" are handled now. The pool is large enough that you have several options to turn a "good" card into a "power" card.

 

For example: going back to the Tactics/Leadership deck from above. I had Eomer in the deck. He is a great card, but even 5 attack (conditional) can't kill every enemy. Well, we have countless ways to build up his attack to ridiculous numbers. In the game I was playing in the example above, Eomer had Rohan Warhorse, Firefoot, Support of the Eagles, Dunedain Cache, Steward of Gondor, and Gondorian Fire on him.

 

So I got his attack to:

3 base

+2 with an ally leaving play

+3 (or more!) from Support of the Eagles

+2 from Firefoot

-----------

10+ attack, where overflow damage (which there usually is) goes onto another enemy, and a readying so that I could do it again. Also, Dundain Cache allowed me to do it against enemies engaged with the other deck. If we each had 1 enemy, I could attack the enemy engaged with the other deck and the excess could damage the enemy engaged with me. I didn't even use Steward of Gondor + Gondorian Fire because I already had overkill.

 

My point is that we don't need standalone power cards anymore. We have the means to build cards that are more powerful than we could ever imagine receiving in packs. Heck, I could have gone further by including Dunedain Marks.

 

So stop worrying about the fact that we don't have any cards that just straight up say "Remove an encounter card in the staging area from play" (just an example... thankfully no one has asked for that specifically yet). We don't need those cards. We need to keep getting cards similar to what we've been getting: cards that work well together to create amazingly powerful combinations. It's a lot more fun and satisfying and it rewards good deck building.

Edited by joezim007

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Well put ^^ "power cards" being a card that can fit in almost any deck and is usable in any situation seems nice so Unexpected Courage for example is super easy to use and very versatile making it quite powerful. These kind of cards I would also argue are unhealthy and bad for the game. I really like cards that are somewhat restricted with use or who they can attach to because they are still very useful and powerful in the right setting but you have to build a proper deck around them and their natural limitations are healthy for the game.  

 

I still think we will get very powerful cards in the future like Galadriel and Treebeard, these also have their limitations but are obviously super powerful and I'm stoked to get them! And as the cardpool grows (which is really slow and will take much time) I think we will will start forgetting or replacing our staple cards with new cards that are powerful in their own type of decks.

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