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MrTInce

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  1. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Rozial in If your players wanted a protocol droid...   
    I find droids a great source of fun and my players have more droids than PCs living on their ship. Mainly because every time they defeat one they drag it back to the ship and reprogram it. This results in all potential mischief.
    The protocol droid my players has was programmed in psychiatry and so we have RP moments of it trying to get the drug addict to stop with addiction.
  2. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Archlyte in Silhouette Size for Creature Companions   
    If you look at the picture of of the jawas next to Owen and Luke there is a height difference but maybe the abstract nature of silhouette means the range starts from jawa and goes up to a wookie.
     

     
    This is of course one of the failures of abstraction in a numbers based game.
  3. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Eoen in If your players wanted a protocol droid...   
    I find droids a great source of fun and my players have more droids than PCs living on their ship. Mainly because every time they defeat one they drag it back to the ship and reprogram it. This results in all potential mischief.
    The protocol droid my players has was programmed in psychiatry and so we have RP moments of it trying to get the drug addict to stop with addiction.
  4. Thanks
    MrTInce got a reaction from ElfSpeaker in A Crew In Need of a Ship   
    Weird looking ship!
  5. Thanks
    MrTInce got a reaction from DurosSpacer in The Dark Side of Sandbox   
    The system using star wars means that it lends itself easily to sandbox style play. When you can jump on a ship and fly anywhere in the galaxy how do you contain the players?
    I run a loose sandbox style game. The players are always looking for work. I give them options and then they choose the mission they want. I don't railroad the players throughout any of it. I do have an overhanging story and subplots that come into play.
     
    I've played in other games (not star wars) where the promise of sandbox is an illusion and the DM wants to tell his story so kept bringing us back to the railroad.
  6. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from LazerSwordsman in Bacta in a Star Wars RPG   
    Limb regrowth maybe?
  7. Thanks
    MrTInce reacted to KRKappel in Star Wars Celebration Chicago   
    FFG provides us with pre-gen player characters and a module for conventions. For something like Gamer Nation Con, I'm often building my own pregens and module if I plan to run something, or running something that I make up as I go with pre-gens. 

    Some general advice for running a con game: 

    1.) Have a variety of encounter types. Combat, social encounters, skill challenges, etc. If you have multiple combat encounters, try and vary them between character ground combat, vehicle combat, mass combat, etc, or incorporate different kinds of NPC opponents or environments to give each combat a very different feeling from another. A cantina brawl vs a firefight in a swamp, for instance.  

    2.) Make sure your module can run in 4 hours, this is the typical length of a convention game. Include a 5-10 minute break at the 2 hour mark for people to use the bathroom or get a snack. 

    3.) Know your pre-gen PCs (no matter if you made them or got them somewhere else). Have an idea of places in your adventure where their background, motivations, and/or obligation/duty/morality might come into play. This makes for a more compelling game experience for the players. 

    4.) Figure out your spiel for explaining how the game works to new players. Be able to do it in under five minutes (including common clarifications and questions). Whatever you can't explain in 5 minutes, they can learn as you play. Test it out a few times. There are some great comic strips that have been made that explain the core mechanic really well. It's not an awful idea to print those out and laminate them, and have them at the table as handouts. 

    5.) Do some work ahead of time. No matter if you homebrew or accept a module, it can save a lot of dead air at the table if you pre-roll/decide enemy initiative. pre-draw any crude maps you know you'll need for sure, even if its just on simple grid paper, unless you really want the checks made in the game to determine what is where. 

    6.) Get adversary cards (and separate them out to just the ones you need) or print the NPC stat blocks on a separate page(s) that you can easily access outside the module itself. Leave space on the page for you to track wounds/strain to avoid more dead air while note taking every combat. 

    The roughest thing about convention games is hitting the four hour mark. This just takes some practice to get a feel for it. So if you tend to try and cram too much combat into one game, youll find its hard to finish, often. 

    Good luck! And remember to have fun!
  8. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from StriderZessei in Players getting too rich   
    For fuel I use the ship silhoutte x 1000 for fuel. Docking fees charge per location, charge more for security, maintenance etc.
    Food cost use the rations item, which works out at 5 credits per day. 
  9. Like
    MrTInce reacted to Nytwyng in Star Wars Celebration Chicago   
    In addition to any advice Keith might have, give a listen to episode 113 of the Order 66 Poscast, “Pros and Cons.” It’s dedicated to the topic of running and playing in con games.
  10. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from penpenpen in (Not) Fully Operational   
    So I emailed FFG. Here is the response:
     
     
     
  11. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Archlyte in The Best Qualities of CRPGS   
    I've always liked victory music
  12. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Ghostofman in The Best Qualities of CRPGS   
    I've always liked victory music
  13. Haha
    MrTInce got a reaction from Rithuan in The Best Qualities of CRPGS   
    I've always liked victory music
  14. Haha
    MrTInce got a reaction from Rithuan in Republic vs Imperial credits   
    Hello,
     
    So my players will be doing a job where they need to steal a large sum of credits (Looking into the millions) for the rebel alliance but I was planning on making the credits old republic credits and no longer legal tender as the empire has new credits. 
     
    Is this a bit too evil?
  15. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from SufficientlyAdvancedMoronics in Trouble Fitting Character Idea to Career   
    In my games that aspect of datapads have been removed they are more like tablets that you have to plug in.
  16. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from DurosSpacer in Players getting too rich   
    For fuel I use the ship silhoutte x 1000 for fuel. Docking fees charge per location, charge more for security, maintenance etc.
    Food cost use the rations item, which works out at 5 credits per day. 
  17. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Sarone in Rise of the Separatists - Anybody know what's going on?   
    I also wonder the delay is caused because it all has to be checked by lucas films to ensure it doesn't contradict anything from canon.
  18. Like
    MrTInce reacted to KungFuFerret in Players getting too rich   
    Cash was never an issue in the stories being told.  They also never bothered running around looting corpses for credits, and actively doing things to try and accumulate wealth.   However the lack of money was the entire plot of the first act of Phantom Menace.   The "we don't really use money" Jedi were suddenly having to find ways to pay for something, without actually having anything to pay with.    Young Han and Q'ira needed money very much to try and get off Coruscant, and the obtaining of said money was very important to them.  For Han it was important throughout his entire life really, young and old.  His debt to Jabba drove all of his actions for the original trilogy.
    To the bigger question of "why do you have to take the players money away?"  I have a counter question of "Why do players seem obsessed with obtaining money just to have piles of it?"  If they don't use it on anything, you know like things like staying alive (food, bills, resources, entertainment, etc), they're just sitting on credits like some greedy dragon on his horde.   Who gives a **** about credits either way?  Obtaining piles of cash to swim in like Scrooge McDuck shouldn't be the Win State for a gaming table.  Because the reality is that people pay for things, all the time, in every way.   Only in a fictional reality like a gaming table, are people able to just constantly accumulate wealth without any expectation of having to spend any for stuff to exist in a society.    
    And honestly, if players are so miserly as to always get upset if they have to *gasp* PAY FOR THINGS, to the point where it's expected that they don't, PLUS, they never actually buy anything with their wealth....then what good is it?  If they don't use it for anything, it's the same as if they don't have any money at all.  If they don't have to worry about paying for food, fuel, tarrifs, taxes, customs inspections, maintenance, ammo, etc, then they are exactly the same situation as a poor group of PCs, because they still have no actual drain on their resources.
    Also, in my experience with other game systems that include wealth, it frequently just makes it less fun.  GM's will introduce some situation, and PC Money Bags will just shrug and say "No problem, I'll just whip out my Ultra-Platinum Credit Card and buy that problem into oblivion."   I've seen it a lot.  And instead of actually having an adventure, the player just tries to pay away the problem.  "I'll just hire some mercs to handle that threat."  "I'll just bribe that official into working for us."  etc etc.  And it's frankly boring in my experience.  
    Bottom line, in my opinion, gamers have a problem with an expectation of all the benefits of having money, without having to deal with any of the drawbacks of actually bothering to consider wealth as a factor in a game.   You can't have it both ways.  
    All that being said, I'm not a fan of adding more layers of book keeping to any game system, but I do think things like "paying for ****" is appropriate, when the rest of the galaxy is expected to do it.   To keep from having to constantly be like "deduct 10 credits for this, 20 credits for that", I'd probably just have some blanket amount deducted at the end of the session, depending on the various "every day activities" they did.   Don't let it break the flow of a scene (unless it's actually important)
  19. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Archlyte in The Dark Side of Sandbox   
    The system using star wars means that it lends itself easily to sandbox style play. When you can jump on a ship and fly anywhere in the galaxy how do you contain the players?
    I run a loose sandbox style game. The players are always looking for work. I give them options and then they choose the mission they want. I don't railroad the players throughout any of it. I do have an overhanging story and subplots that come into play.
     
    I've played in other games (not star wars) where the promise of sandbox is an illusion and the DM wants to tell his story so kept bringing us back to the railroad.
  20. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Underachiever599 in Players getting too rich   
    I have this problem too, my players had a nice ship aswell as 100k in the "bank". I found a way to damage their ship to the point it costed 70,000 to repair fully.
    I feel bad for this but I was rewarding my players with too much money so I needed to curtail this. Going forward they will be getting less credits and more goods for rewards.
    As for things to spend it on, other than ship maintenance ask the players what they want. Offer up investment chances or propose a sense of permanence (buying a homestead).
  21. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Mark Caliber in The Dark Side of Sandbox   
    The system using star wars means that it lends itself easily to sandbox style play. When you can jump on a ship and fly anywhere in the galaxy how do you contain the players?
    I run a loose sandbox style game. The players are always looking for work. I give them options and then they choose the mission they want. I don't railroad the players throughout any of it. I do have an overhanging story and subplots that come into play.
     
    I've played in other games (not star wars) where the promise of sandbox is an illusion and the DM wants to tell his story so kept bringing us back to the railroad.
  22. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from Dodd81 in Players getting too rich   
    For fuel I use the ship silhoutte x 1000 for fuel. Docking fees charge per location, charge more for security, maintenance etc.
    Food cost use the rations item, which works out at 5 credits per day. 
  23. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from RLogue177 in Players getting too rich   
    I have this problem too, my players had a nice ship aswell as 100k in the "bank". I found a way to damage their ship to the point it costed 70,000 to repair fully.
    I feel bad for this but I was rewarding my players with too much money so I needed to curtail this. Going forward they will be getting less credits and more goods for rewards.
    As for things to spend it on, other than ship maintenance ask the players what they want. Offer up investment chances or propose a sense of permanence (buying a homestead).
  24. Thanks
    MrTInce got a reaction from DurosSpacer in Less XP than the party   
    I've had players with characters that died and when they returned the group had earned 50 xp and 200 xp. The first time he got the value the second time it was about 180xp. This was because the 20xp variance was RPing rewards. This player was fine with that because he soon made it up using every chance to RP and gain those xp.
     
    The disparage you talk about seems off. The only way I would allow that would be to offer the reward of greater xp later. If you are new to a character you may plan out the 300xp from creation, which is fine but knowing how a character plays may change your opinion on how to spend the xp. As a GM I would segment the xp over a number of sessions. For example if the invested heavily into mechanics they can't retract it but slowly they can see how their character fits into a group. It would only be over a number of sessions.
    From canon think of episode IV. Leia and Han would have more xp than Luke at the beginning as they have had more interesting lives before the film. Luke (between his experiences during the film) gains more xp than Han and Leia and by the end is closer to them in ability.
  25. Like
    MrTInce got a reaction from RLogue177 in Pneumatic Fist   
    I like the repulsor fist cybernetic but wished there were more options for weapon based cybernetics.
     
    I came up with the Pneumatic Fist with the following stats, the idea of a repeating punching item.
     
    Is this too powerful? Too nerfed? 
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