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Cantriped

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  1. Cantriped

    Genesys Talents Expanded

    Of the two, I'd say the second is more balanced... however I don't particularly see the point in buying/using either of them, or the original talent for that matter. Templar only even needs to exist because of RoT's specific permutation of the Magic System. Otherwise you could just buy a rank in Divine later (for the same initial cost of 10 XP). Assuming you take Divine to Rank 5, you'll only save 20 XP over someone who just developed the skill cross-career (but can cast their spells without restriction). If I really wanted to play a more casterly Templar, I'd just start with a career that gave me access to Divine instead; even if I ended up paying more for Melee or Brawl developing it cross-career. Its worth it to avoid the arbitrary restriction on magic-use.
  2. Cantriped

    Tattoo magic, modern day rune/glyph mages

    I think that most of said runes would function best as reflavored Item Attachments and/or Cybernetics. So first I'd raid those rules for their mechanics and design principles. My second suggestion is to avoid minor circumstancial bonuses to checks. The benefits rarely outweigh the cost of having yet more details to track. Instead, many rune-bearing items could simply be "the right tool for the job". For Example: Lock & Key Glyphs: These glyphs magically lock the portal they're engraved unto, such that only the bearer of an item with the matching glyph may open or pass through it. A successful skulduggery check might indicate the character was able to mar the lock glyph, or fake a key glyph. A magically-glyphed physical lock might even require a specific key bearing a specific glyph to open (or a set of properly glyphed lock picking tools to even make the check). Most Glyphed Armor & Weapons can simply have better profiles than their mundane counterparts. I'd grant bonus Damage/Soak, but be leary of making weapons more accurate; because accuracy and evasion can't scale like damage and armor/soak can. Most abstractly, an Anchor glyph might simply fix the relative positions of two objects, and the applications of such an enchantment are endless. Bonding dissimilar materials, levitating structures anchored in mid-air above their foundations, nearly-frictionless machinery (with moving parts that never actually touch).
  3. Cantriped

    Pricing New Armor

    NEW ITEM DESIGN NOTES My design goals diverge significantly from the GCRB guidelines with regard to the best available armor. In addition, while these items are based on historical research, they're not expected to be historically accurate. Amongst other things, they're created by the denizens of a magical world, so magic-use is assumed to be part of the crafting process. First, typically only armor at least partially composed of a rigid material (such as metal or wood) provides any Defense. Second, which armor types have Hard Points was determined by whether it made sense to be able to attach Spikes to it; though a high enough crafting check can still add Hard Point to a suit of armor without any (per the crarting rules in RoT). Third, on the one hand I wanted the best suit of armor available to cap-out its wearer's Defense, but on the other I also wanted shields to remain viable throughout the campaign. Thus, the best armor provides 4 Defense if an Ironbound Rune is attached, meanwhile shields now provide a secondary defensive benefit which stacks with worn armor. Finally, all of these items have been priced using the guidelines from the GCRB; with the exceptions of new qualities (which I've priced), and changes to Hard Point values (which I priced as "other qualities"). Where a range of values were given, I used the lowest price adjustment (meaning many of these items have room to grow more expensive). A few items (such as the Heavy Robe), are actually worth $0 due to lacking Hard Points, so I split the difference at $25. About Aketons: Aketons are included (at no additional cost) in many of these suits of armor, and generally you'd have to wear the included Aketon in order to equip the rest of the suit of armor. However, they're still effectively two seperate suits of armor whose benefits don't stack; so if your maille ensemble is destroyed, you're still protected by the Aketon you wore beneath it. Regarding Fortify: I invented this quality so that I would have an additional factor with which to distinguish various types of armor. I based it on the already extant talents and abilities which reduce the severity of Critical Injuries. The heaviest suits of armor grant a few ranks of Fortify, as do shields. Thankfully, multiple sources of fortify explicitly stack. Regarding Noisy: It exists solely to replace the cludgy wording included in certain items used to impose the same penalty. The reason I've made it a quality is so that I can easily target it with other game elements. Such as a Talent that reduces the Noisy rating of worn armor by a few points, or a craftsmanship/attachment that modifies its Noisy rating.
  4. Cantriped

    Pricing New Armor

    NEW ITEM QUALITIES Fortify (Passive) While wearing armor or using an item with the Fortify quality, your character reduces any Critical Injury result they suffer by 5 times its Fortify rating, to a minimum of "01". Multiple sources of fortify stack with one another. For example, a character wearing armor with Fortify 3, and using a shield with Fortify 2 has a total rating of Fortify 5 (which reduces the result of any Critical Injury they suffer by 25) Price: 50 × (Fortify rating)² Noisy (Passive) While wearing armor or using an item with the Noisy quality, your character adds a number of Setback to Stealth checks they make equal to its Noisy rating. Price: -50 × (Noisy rating)² NEW ARMOR SUITS Heavy Robe A heavy robe is made from several layers of thick fabric. They're usually worn for comfort or aesthetic, rather than the minimal protection they provide. Armor Profile: 0 Defense, +1 Soak, 0 Hard Points, 2 Encumbrance. Price 25, Rarity 0. Sturdy Jacket A sturdy jacket is made from leather with a thin fabric lining. They're usually worn for comfort or aesthetic, rather than the minimal protection they provide. Armor Profile: 0 Defense, +1 Soak, 0 Hard Points, 1 Encumbrance. Price 75, Rarity 0. Winter Cloak A winter cloak is made from wool or furs. Although typically worn for warmth, these durable cloaks also be used to deflect projectiles. While wearing a winter cloak, your character removes one Setback from any Survival or Resilience checks they make due to cold weather, but add one Setback to any Survival or Resilience checks they make due to warm weather. A winter cloak can be worn over other armor, and its benefits stack with the other suit of armor while doing so. Armor Profile: 0 Defense, 0 Soak, 0 Hard Points, 1 Encumbrance; Deflection 1. Price 25, Rarity 0. Aketon An aketon is a padded doublet made from layers of quilted fabric and leather. They're designed to be worn beneath a particular kind of heavier armor (such as a brigandine or maille ensemble). An Aketon is rarely worn seperately, except by a courtier donning a fashionable aketon in order to feign martial prowess. However, it also provides minimal protection by itself. An aketon includes a matching set of sturdy leather boots and gloves. Armor Profile: 0 Defense, +1 Soak, 0 Hard Points, 1 Encumbrance. Price 75, Rarity 1. Gambeson A gambeson is a padded greatcoat made from layers of quilted fabric and soft leather. Although similar to an aketon, a gambeson is actually designed to be worn as armor. A gambeson includes a matching set of sturdy leather boots and gloves. Armor Profile: 1 Defense, +1 Soak, 1 Hard Point, 2 Encumbrance. Price 200, Rarity 2. Brigandine A brigandine is an armored coat or vest made from small metal plates riveted between layers of soft leather or quilted fabric. A brigandine includes a matching aketon. Armor Profile: 1 Defense, +1 Soak, 1 Hard Point, 2 Encumbrance; Fortify 1. Price 250, Rarity 4. Cuir Bouilli Suit A cuir bouilli suit is armor made from thick, intricately shaped, boiled leather plates, which are either riveted or strapped together. This armor protects the wearer's whole body. A cuir bouilli suit includes a matching aketon. Armor Profile: 1 Defense, +2 Soak, 1 Hard Point, 2 Encumbrance. Price 825, Rarity 5. Lacquered Ensemble A lacquered ensemble is a suit of armor made from lacquered wooden splints and wicker meshs affixed to a soft leather backing with quilted fabric padding. This armor protects the wearer's whole body. A lacquered ensemble includes a matching aketon. Armor Profile: 1 Defense, +2 Soak, 2 Hard Points, 2 Encumbrance; Fortify 1, Noisy 1. Price 875, Rarity 5. Maille Ensemble A maille ensemble is a suit of armor made from several layers of interlocking metal links and quilted fabric. A maille ensemble consists of a hauberk, chausses, maille-gauntlets, and a maille-coif. A maille ensemble includes a matching aketon. Armor Profile: 2 Defense, +2 Soak, 2 Hard Points, 3 Encumbrance; Fortify 2, Noisy 2. Price 2,000, Rarity 6. Scaled-Maille Suit A scaled-maille suit is armor made from small, overlapping metal plates riveted to a layer of maille with a quilted fabric backing. A scaled-maille suit includes maille-gauntlets, an aventail helm, and a matching aketon. Armor Profile: 2 Defense, +3 Soak, 2 Hard Points, 3 Encumbrance; Fortify 3, Noisy 2. Price 2,825, Rarity 7. Plated-Maille Suit A plated-maille suit is armor made from large overlapping metal plates riveted to a layer of maille with a quilted fabric backing. A plated-maille suit includes plated-gauntlets and sabatons, a great helm, and a matching aketon. Armor Profile: 3 Defense, +3 Soak, 2 Hard Points, 4 Encumbrance; Fortify 3, Noisy 2. Price 4,250, Rarity 7. Fully-Plated Ensemble A fully-plated ensemble is a suit of armor made from dozens of intricately shaped, thickly padded, articulated metal plates; either strapped or riveted together. This armor protects the wearer's whole body. A fully-plated ensemble includes a matching aketon. Armor Profile: 3 Defense, 4 Soak, 3 Hard Points, 5 Encumbrance; Fortify 4, Noisy 3. Price 5,950, Rarity 8. NEW WEAPONS Pavise A pavise is essentially just an oversized shield which can be used as a portable wall. A character using a pavise can spend a maneuver to unequip and anchor it to a surface (or to disengage and equip it). While anchored, the pavise can't be used as a weapon, and doesn't occupy a hand, but characters who're engaged with the pavise can take cover behind it (providing 4 ranged defense). Weapon Profile: Melee (Light), Damage (3 + Brawn), Critical 5, Range (Engaged), 2 Hard Points, 3 Encumbrance; Cumbersome 4, Defensive 2, Deflection 4, Fortify 2, Inaccurate 2, Knockdown. Price: 1,050, Rarity: 3. Shield A shield is a sturdy wooden board, covered with leather, and reinforced with a metal frame. They hang from the wearer's arm by a leather strap and are held onto by a metal handle. A shield is intended to be used to deflect blows and projectiles, but they also decent back-up weapons. Weapon Profile: Melee (Light), Damage (2 + Brawn), Critical 5, Range (Engaged), 1 Hard Point, 2 Encumbrance; Cumbersome 2, Defensive 2, Deflection 2, Fortify 2, Inaccurate 2, Knockdown. Price: 350, Rarity: 2.
  5. Cantriped

    Advice for new talent- Hold My Beer

    Either Talent should have to be activated before making the check, and/or be limited to once per encounter.
  6. Cantriped

    Learning about Android

    Amazon has copies of The Worlds of Android for $28ish. However, besides official sources there's always a Wikia.
  7. Cantriped

    Vehicles in Genesys - a player resource

    RoT has a Wagon entry... but it's rather vague. It gives a price, rarity, encumbrance capacity, and mentions needing to be drawn by "a beast of burden" to move at a "moderate speed". However, no vehicle profile was given. Leaving me to guess what it's speed, handling, and other statistics are supposed to be. So to be more specific I'm looking for suggestions/examples of vehicle profiles appropriate to a fantasy campaign.
  8. Cantriped

    Advice for new talent- Hold My Beer

    I suddenly want the foil-Talent "All Part Of The Plan" where it allows you to add a Failure to the result in exchange for an Advantage. I imagine them being taken by quirky characters in lighter hearted games.
  9. Cantriped

    Advice for new talent- Hold My Beer

    The average results should cancel each other out... but the mechanics themselves run counter to some of genesys' core principles (namely the minimizing of dice pools). This talent adds up to 10 dice to the pool with a net result of no effect. Which seems like a waste of XP and the time spent rolling and reading all those extra dice. Alternatively, I would make it a talent where you spend a few Strain to remove a number of Setback from noncombat checks. That way its a talent that you activate right before you do something that would normally be very difficult due to circumstance; such as most drunken dares. ergo, "Hold mah' Berr".
  10. Cantriped

    Ettins in Genesys

    Ettins are essentially just another kind of giant. So you could easily use RoT's Giant profile without modification. The second head is often just flavor (considerimg they're combined intellect is typically still pretty low). If you wish to mechanically distinguish the second head: You could give the Giant another rank in Vigilance and Perception. You could also give the Ettin a second, limited action (such as incanting a Spell) or else the equivalent of two-weapon fighting.
  11. Cantriped

    D&D Style "Stats" and Class Features as Talents

    Ehh... They're actually not that much more powerful than Magic-Users were (as they were called back then). I've played both, they're still frail as all ****. Getting a d6 instead of a d4 is only an average increase of 1 hit point per level, and they've basically the same spell-slot progression... Except High HP and high Saving Throws were generally scarce in 1E, and Ye Olde Magic Shop wasn't yet a system wide expectation, so their spells were actually more effective for their relative level. Also, your example wizard would have still eventually gained their upper level slots, they'd have simply been forced to fill them with lower level spells (woe is me, more Fireballs), or use a Headband of Intellect to raise their stat. As for Ains, he's not really suitable for use as a PC (he's a power-fantasy, the world isn't supposed to present a challange to him). So it doesn't matter what he would be worth, although 10,000 xp seems excessive. Considering that a capped Skill is only worth 75 xp and a capped Characteristic 150 xp (210 for a 6); With 6 attributes and ~33 skills he'd cap everything out at a cost of about 3,400 xp (before getting to talents, which would take much longer to price). However I doubt he has very many ranks in social or general skills, considering his 'NPCs' are constantly out-maneuvering him as he struggles to keep up the facade that he knows what's going on. He's cerrainly overpowered, but the person controlling Ains is not particularly skilled; he was just a 'normal future-day human video-gamer'.
  12. Cantriped

    Wild West Setting for Genesys

    While it is true the division is technically unnecessary, I defend the advice by saying that my division makes more sence in the scope of the setting than using the light/heavy axis would have. Genesys makes it fairly clear that I'm 'supposed' to divide up whichever of the combat skills will be most iconic to the setting, but I find the extant examples woefully bland. I also broke them up the way I did because otherwise, you end up with most everybody having to invest in both subskills regardless of what kind of ranged weapons they wanted to use.
  13. Cantriped

    Explosives??

    Yet RoT still suggests using Mechanics for most crafting, instead of inventing a slew of specific skills. Regardless, what skill to use (or whether to create a new skill) should depend upon setting. If explosives deserved their own combat skill in the setting, I would call it Demolition. Otherwise, I'd call for Skulduggery to set up an explosive to be used in combat. Depending on setting or conditions, creating explosives might call for Alchemy/Chemistry (Fantasy/Modern) or Mechanics (Space Opera). However, unless the campaign is going to focus heavily on manufacturing as a player activity, there's no benefit to introducing a lot of granular subskills for crafting. They'd just be an XP tax for playing the crafter. Either way, one could introduce a recipe-book mechanic to control who can craft what. Using recipes has the fringe benefit of making it easier to reference what skill(s) a crafter would need in their campaign, and how skilled they need to be to craft any given thing.
  14. Cantriped

    Wild West Setting for Genesys

    1: The PCs are deputised by an NPC sherif that needs help bringing bandits to justice. As an added complication, the sherif is murdered soon after. 2: The PCs are hired by a wealthy land owner to retrieve his 'kidnapped' daughter. The twist is she actually ran away to elope with a childhood friend.
  15. Cantriped

    Wild West Setting for Genesys

    Regarding Dynamite It was iconic enough to the setting that "Demolition" could be a valuable skill addition. Otherwise, I'd use skulduggery for any checks related to dynamite (including combat checks with thrown dynamite).
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