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micheldebruyn

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  1. All of it is, I think. Some of the locations like Taris and Malachor have shown up in canon, but the factions, events, and even the major characters of the era are firmly Legends. I mean, I think there was canonically a Republic and a Sith Empire, who didn't get along, and that's about as far as it goes for canon.
  2. Not so much a KoTOR trilogy as a trilogy set thousands of years before the current era (well, supposedly). Whether they will incorporate anything from KoTOR is very much in doubt, but I'm kinda hoping not. Because KoTOR feels more like it is set in a far away corner of the present Star Wars universe than thousands of years in the past. The only differneces between normal Star Wars and KoTOR is that the latter uses slightly different ships and guns. And not even technically inferior ones.
  3. Again, "I shall not kill clones, unless they're attacking me or my friends" isn't an Obligation. It's also not something that is likely to ever be an issue for the character because you play it super-safe and include an allowance to slaughter them if it is necessary. How often do you figure you'll ever be in a position where you need to kill clones who are not bothering the party? An Obligation doesn't leave a way out. I think Obligation isn't really the right word for the game mechanic, but I can't think of a better one. Edge Of the Empire characters are people who are outside of the mainstream of society, and their Obligation is why this is so. Their Obligation is why they can't just be normal people, get a job, and settle down. You should think about the effects of having a high/low Obligation on a party (the table on page 308 of the EotE Core book gives a good idea). An unwillingnes to kill certain kinds of people isn't an Obligation, it's almost an anti-Obligation. It makes your character more normal. A good Oath Obligation would be more along the lines of "I shall hunt down slavers anywhere without mercy and free their victims."
  4. It's weird how in-universe and real-world reasons for things can sometimes go into a feedback loop. Because the saber is purple for no other reason than that SLJ wanted a unique looking colour. Other writers later figured, hey, purple is kinda like red, Mace must be kinda close to the dark side, let's give him a super-agressive lightsaber style in the EU (none of the styles existed in the movies at the time). Which is now turning back into "hey, maybe he's saber is turning purple because of his Vaapad style".
  5. As oaths go, I find it lacking. It's "I swear not to do the thing if it can be avoided." That to me is less a serious oath and more "I will try not to do the thing." And since this is set post-Clone Wars, the thing is not very likely to come into play anyway. It's basically forcing the GM to find ways to put antagonistic clones into the story. And like Kualan said, even if you run into hordes of killer clones, that's not an issue, you can just take them out A-Team style. It's nice as a character trait, but I would not allow it as an Obligation because it's too specific and easily avoided. You in theory would accumulate obligation by being reminded of what made you swear it in the first place, things like spending time with clones. And also by having to break the oath and feeling really bad about it afterwards. You un-accumulate it by... getting over it. By having negative experiences with clones. And by breaking the oath a lot.
  6. The way I read it, the power represents Anakin's supernal talent with technology. Nothing in any of it suggests you can alter stuff in ways visible to the naked eye.
  7. How do you leap from "shapes machine components on a molecular level, allowing him to mend damaged mechanical systems" and "the user may spend Force points to recover system strain" to metal-bending? Even the Mastery doesn't let you do anything even close to bending a metal bar into a climbing hook.
  8. I think that, basically, that you roll your full Force rating at the start of a session, and put it in the Destiny Pool. And it is important to remember what everybody rolled exactly, because apparently there's important differences between a die showing two white pips and two dice showing one white pip. And then you never roll for Force rating ever again. Whenever you need Force points, you just take some of the pre-rolled dice from the Destiny Pool, use the rolled results, and reroll the die or dice you used and add it back to the pool.
  9. That's not how it works. If a GM's interpretation of certain rules is rejected by his players, he'll have to adjust his views. Being the GM is not supposed to be a dictatorial position.
  10. I have never even heard of a... (googles) oh, hey, that's the Long Shot from the old WEG Campaign Pack that we used for ages. Awesome.
  11. I would say no. The intent of the power is clearly that it just heals/fixes machines. Move lets you pick locks with its final Control upgrade. Also, to change the chemical make-up, you need to go sub-atomic. That's a whole other power-level.
  12. I have a question: is this intended as a combat encounter, or is this just you guys meeting him for whatever reason?
  13. "Jedi" is just the name of a career. It doesn't define that career, and if, say, you want to play a more cloak and daggers kind of Jedi like Quinlan Vos, you're better off taking the Sentinel career, which wouldn't give you the discount despite your character being as much a Jedi as Obi-Wan. And I now agree with Sharatec, it seems to simply refer to the discount for career skills everybody gets. [flips through some books] Yep, every career in all three core books gets the same wording.
  14. It says Jedi get an unspecified XP discount and then it never gets brought up again. At a guess, this is something they intended to do at one point, scrapped the entire idea, and poor editing left a few references to it in the text. That, or they completely forgot to put the chapter on XP into the book. Giving them an XP discount seems unbalancing because the otherwise mechanically identical F&D careers don't get it.
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