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Currahee Chris

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  1. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from HadesHerald in Ruleset advice: Running a business   
    I have pitched an idea to my players about bringing all their EOE characters together into a large pot and becoming employees of a corporation. As members of this company, they will earn "stock" and have an ownership interest. As they complete missions for the company, naturally they will move up the corporate ladder so to speak, thereby earning more profits for themselves and a bigger share of the overall company.
    The reception was very enthusiastic. One problem, I hadn't fully fleshed out rules for how I wanted to handle this exactly! I have some loose concept ideas which I can put to paper but figured it would be wise to consult the forum to see if anyone else has any insight, especially if there is anything in any of the 3 core rulebooks I could use as a basis.
    Game wise I don't want to bog down the adventure portion of the game with business rules. I have acquired all the published modules for the three games and am doing up "Job Summaries". I will then have the group meet and decide which course of adventures (jobs) the party goes for. I can see this being a unique and fun twist to the game that can add an extra layer of intrigue and social roleplaying, but I don't want it to be all encompassing.
    Ultimately, the party members will get paid as each module suggest. However, in an attempt to simulate "behind the scenes" activities of the company, I want to make like a quarterly roll that pays out a bonus to the players based on if the company was profitable for the quarter and/or their stocks can increase/decrease. Something where I might make a roll every other/third session to simulate the passage of time and the overall direction the company is taking.
    Any advice/ abstractions would be greatly appreciated.
    Best regards
    CC
  2. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to Ahrimon in Ruleset advice: Running a business   
    You can use the AoR duty rules.  They represent earning standing in a group and moving up the ladder (chain).
  3. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to Klort in Ruleset advice: Running a business   
    far horizons, the colonist splatbook, has some rules on how to handle a business. in a nutshell, all npcs gain a career skill that relates to the type of business and then they each get a number of credits at the end of each month. additional upgrades can be bought, like more money/month, better security, additional npcs etc
  4. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from themensch in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    I really like that- that sounds fun! I agree with the posts subsequent to mine as well- know the NPC motivations- perhaps he wants credits, a drink, a job or friendship, perhaps he's really a bounty hunter in disguise who is talking up the party as a distraction.
    I do the same thing with social encounters- let the players talk and describe their actions- after all, this is supposed to be a "narrative" driven game and I do not believe it should be up to the GM to describe what the pcs are saying or doing.
    On the flip side, I have been involved with ungodly tedious social roleplaying as recently as last months August Pathfinder session. We always start playing at 4, we didn't start swinging swords till close to 9pm. My son (age 21) actually role played going to a town and getting a 3 day job to dig a ditch for 3 copper pieces a day. That was INSANELY boring!!! Surprisingly the DM, he is a couple years older than me and I thought he would have more DMing experience but apparently I was wrong.
    Social Encounters are, in my opinion, the art or lifeblood of any RPG. The technical side is knowing the rules. The "Art" and what separates the good from the great GM's are social encounters. Social encounters grow the gaming experience and add a completely new level of immersion to the game. If you compare it to real life, thing about your job or classes or whatever. Do the interesting challenges you face or really memorable moments come from crunching numbers or entering data or writing a paper or do they come from interaction with other people- good or bad.   
  5. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from themensch in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Hello- I am finding that my group (8 players strong) generally wants social almost as much as combat. To them, those types of encounters really make SW come alive. I do social really really well. Here are some answers I have for your questions:
    1- take a moment to pause and think about how you would react to this type of encounter in real life. RPGs throw a quirk in there given that different races might react a lot differently than you and I would.
    2- in connection with my answer to number 1 above, try and develop (or think of) some instances where his lesser used social skills can actually be put to use.
    3- Well, I would advise you to not be- after all, failing at social encounters can generally lead to making the players actually think rather than just rolling dice. They have to formulate a plan and come up with a solution as players rather than just letting the dice do the work for them. Are you sure you aren't allowing them to fail because you prefer not to deal with social encounters and would rather just let them succeed so you can move on to the next combat? Be honest withyourself- if the answer is yes, you may be cheating them out of some memorable fun.
    I do little prep work as a GM simply because I have learned how to do really good social encounters (I have been a DM/GM for 35 years now  so time has helped! :)) I have found that you don't need to hurry up and give immediate answers, if they surprise you, take your time and be imaginative and reasonable. If you act reasonably, your players will accept your decision and go with it.
    Memorable social encounters- oh my have we ever!!! My best friend and his wife were playing a Gand merc and a Bothan Dancer. They joined our group 2-3 sessions in and during the player introductions I told the main group "You see a shapely Bothan and runtish Gand over near a small access door." Ok we casually stroll over to see what's up. As the party approached, the Bothan started doing some semi-provocative dancing and the Gand "Throws his hat down"- it was hilarious and everyone laughed.
    The other memorable moment came when one girl in our group (Age 21, somewhat shy) who plays the face (go figure lol) for the party was watching a fight with a male NPC contact. She knew he was being dumped by his girlfriend and was trying to console him. The poor girls goes "I put my hand on his knee and start stroking...." as soon as she said that, the 4 guys (ages 21-26) start ripping up with laughter and she got incredibly red faced. It was easily the best moment of our gaming year.
    Good luck!
  6. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from Vestij Jai Galaar in Upping difficulty in Mask of the Pirate Queen [SPOILERS]   
    Just wrapped this one up Friday night. All in all a decent adventure. My "middle" pick of the 3 EOE adventures- behind Beyond but better than Jewel.
    The party had just boarded the Renegade's Blood as we picked up the action. I had them go through all 4 of the optional encounters- Abandon ship, Damage Control, Breached Compartment and Mantellian Mayhem. In addition, I had the entire party make a Discipline/Cool check (their choice), after each of these encounters- to represent the stress of running about on a starship that was under considerable assault. Each check was upgraded following the completion of each- starting with easy following abandon ship and ending with daunting after MM. Each failure resulted in -2 strain which definitely took it's toll on the party.
    I upgraded the Mantellian to 36 wounds, durable 3, frenzied attack 2 and adversary 1.
    When the party encountered the Queen, I had her cockpit completely impenetrable- it wasn't, but given their time constraints, it was. I REALLY REALLY wanted the party to join her but no dice. I even up'd her bluff by claiming she had another fleet coming to rescue her and they would be arriving from hyperspace in a few minutes. The computer specialist had hacked into the bridge computer and was able to confirm the jump coordinates. In reality, the ships were tugs that were incoming as part of a bluff to force the ZC's fleet to fall back.
    Ultimately the party didn't bite so I had her spring out from her cockpit and attack. I upgraded her as such- Wounds 32, Melee 4, Ranged Light 3, Soak 7, Adversary 3, and she took the Marauder talent tree- Toughenedx4, frenzied attack x2, feral strength x3, lethal blows x2, heroic fortitude, enduring x2, natural brawler, defensive stance.
    Surprisingly the party waxed her pretty quickly and booked it to their ship to leave. However, I tacked on a demolition charge to the outside of her cockpit which detonated as she died. I gave all the PCs a chance to dodge the damage with a daunting (for half) or formidable (for no) athletics or agility check (again, players choice). Unfortunately the guy who played the Jawa demolitionist didn't show up for the evenings session so the party was at a disadvantage.  They then played through the betrayal by Venlanna, which I felt was really weak and predictable given essentially the same thing happened after Jewel.  
    I was very pleased with how I ran it. I think using the "fear" rules more can be very beneficial for GM's to create heightened senses of anxiety and stress.
  7. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from Karelzarath in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Hello- I am finding that my group (8 players strong) generally wants social almost as much as combat. To them, those types of encounters really make SW come alive. I do social really really well. Here are some answers I have for your questions:
    1- take a moment to pause and think about how you would react to this type of encounter in real life. RPGs throw a quirk in there given that different races might react a lot differently than you and I would.
    2- in connection with my answer to number 1 above, try and develop (or think of) some instances where his lesser used social skills can actually be put to use.
    3- Well, I would advise you to not be- after all, failing at social encounters can generally lead to making the players actually think rather than just rolling dice. They have to formulate a plan and come up with a solution as players rather than just letting the dice do the work for them. Are you sure you aren't allowing them to fail because you prefer not to deal with social encounters and would rather just let them succeed so you can move on to the next combat? Be honest withyourself- if the answer is yes, you may be cheating them out of some memorable fun.
    I do little prep work as a GM simply because I have learned how to do really good social encounters (I have been a DM/GM for 35 years now  so time has helped! :)) I have found that you don't need to hurry up and give immediate answers, if they surprise you, take your time and be imaginative and reasonable. If you act reasonably, your players will accept your decision and go with it.
    Memorable social encounters- oh my have we ever!!! My best friend and his wife were playing a Gand merc and a Bothan Dancer. They joined our group 2-3 sessions in and during the player introductions I told the main group "You see a shapely Bothan and runtish Gand over near a small access door." Ok we casually stroll over to see what's up. As the party approached, the Bothan started doing some semi-provocative dancing and the Gand "Throws his hat down"- it was hilarious and everyone laughed.
    The other memorable moment came when one girl in our group (Age 21, somewhat shy) who plays the face (go figure lol) for the party was watching a fight with a male NPC contact. She knew he was being dumped by his girlfriend and was trying to console him. The poor girls goes "I put my hand on his knee and start stroking...." as soon as she said that, the 4 guys (ages 21-26) start ripping up with laughter and she got incredibly red faced. It was easily the best moment of our gaming year.
    Good luck!
  8. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to Yaccarus in I don't care much for alien species as PC's   
    How dare you?
  9. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from SFC Snuffy in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Hello- I am finding that my group (8 players strong) generally wants social almost as much as combat. To them, those types of encounters really make SW come alive. I do social really really well. Here are some answers I have for your questions:
    1- take a moment to pause and think about how you would react to this type of encounter in real life. RPGs throw a quirk in there given that different races might react a lot differently than you and I would.
    2- in connection with my answer to number 1 above, try and develop (or think of) some instances where his lesser used social skills can actually be put to use.
    3- Well, I would advise you to not be- after all, failing at social encounters can generally lead to making the players actually think rather than just rolling dice. They have to formulate a plan and come up with a solution as players rather than just letting the dice do the work for them. Are you sure you aren't allowing them to fail because you prefer not to deal with social encounters and would rather just let them succeed so you can move on to the next combat? Be honest withyourself- if the answer is yes, you may be cheating them out of some memorable fun.
    I do little prep work as a GM simply because I have learned how to do really good social encounters (I have been a DM/GM for 35 years now  so time has helped! :)) I have found that you don't need to hurry up and give immediate answers, if they surprise you, take your time and be imaginative and reasonable. If you act reasonably, your players will accept your decision and go with it.
    Memorable social encounters- oh my have we ever!!! My best friend and his wife were playing a Gand merc and a Bothan Dancer. They joined our group 2-3 sessions in and during the player introductions I told the main group "You see a shapely Bothan and runtish Gand over near a small access door." Ok we casually stroll over to see what's up. As the party approached, the Bothan started doing some semi-provocative dancing and the Gand "Throws his hat down"- it was hilarious and everyone laughed.
    The other memorable moment came when one girl in our group (Age 21, somewhat shy) who plays the face (go figure lol) for the party was watching a fight with a male NPC contact. She knew he was being dumped by his girlfriend and was trying to console him. The poor girls goes "I put my hand on his knee and start stroking...." as soon as she said that, the 4 guys (ages 21-26) start ripping up with laughter and she got incredibly red faced. It was easily the best moment of our gaming year.
    Good luck!
  10. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from Archlyte in I don't care much for alien species as PC's   
    I actually don't play anything but humans. I don't know why but for me, none of the alien races in SW are even remotely interesting.  My wife plays a droid and another character is a wookie.
  11. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from edwardavern in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Hello- I am finding that my group (8 players strong) generally wants social almost as much as combat. To them, those types of encounters really make SW come alive. I do social really really well. Here are some answers I have for your questions:
    1- take a moment to pause and think about how you would react to this type of encounter in real life. RPGs throw a quirk in there given that different races might react a lot differently than you and I would.
    2- in connection with my answer to number 1 above, try and develop (or think of) some instances where his lesser used social skills can actually be put to use.
    3- Well, I would advise you to not be- after all, failing at social encounters can generally lead to making the players actually think rather than just rolling dice. They have to formulate a plan and come up with a solution as players rather than just letting the dice do the work for them. Are you sure you aren't allowing them to fail because you prefer not to deal with social encounters and would rather just let them succeed so you can move on to the next combat? Be honest withyourself- if the answer is yes, you may be cheating them out of some memorable fun.
    I do little prep work as a GM simply because I have learned how to do really good social encounters (I have been a DM/GM for 35 years now  so time has helped! :)) I have found that you don't need to hurry up and give immediate answers, if they surprise you, take your time and be imaginative and reasonable. If you act reasonably, your players will accept your decision and go with it.
    Memorable social encounters- oh my have we ever!!! My best friend and his wife were playing a Gand merc and a Bothan Dancer. They joined our group 2-3 sessions in and during the player introductions I told the main group "You see a shapely Bothan and runtish Gand over near a small access door." Ok we casually stroll over to see what's up. As the party approached, the Bothan started doing some semi-provocative dancing and the Gand "Throws his hat down"- it was hilarious and everyone laughed.
    The other memorable moment came when one girl in our group (Age 21, somewhat shy) who plays the face (go figure lol) for the party was watching a fight with a male NPC contact. She knew he was being dumped by his girlfriend and was trying to console him. The poor girls goes "I put my hand on his knee and start stroking...." as soon as she said that, the 4 guys (ages 21-26) start ripping up with laughter and she got incredibly red faced. It was easily the best moment of our gaming year.
    Good luck!
  12. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from DurosSpacer in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Hello- I am finding that my group (8 players strong) generally wants social almost as much as combat. To them, those types of encounters really make SW come alive. I do social really really well. Here are some answers I have for your questions:
    1- take a moment to pause and think about how you would react to this type of encounter in real life. RPGs throw a quirk in there given that different races might react a lot differently than you and I would.
    2- in connection with my answer to number 1 above, try and develop (or think of) some instances where his lesser used social skills can actually be put to use.
    3- Well, I would advise you to not be- after all, failing at social encounters can generally lead to making the players actually think rather than just rolling dice. They have to formulate a plan and come up with a solution as players rather than just letting the dice do the work for them. Are you sure you aren't allowing them to fail because you prefer not to deal with social encounters and would rather just let them succeed so you can move on to the next combat? Be honest withyourself- if the answer is yes, you may be cheating them out of some memorable fun.
    I do little prep work as a GM simply because I have learned how to do really good social encounters (I have been a DM/GM for 35 years now  so time has helped! :)) I have found that you don't need to hurry up and give immediate answers, if they surprise you, take your time and be imaginative and reasonable. If you act reasonably, your players will accept your decision and go with it.
    Memorable social encounters- oh my have we ever!!! My best friend and his wife were playing a Gand merc and a Bothan Dancer. They joined our group 2-3 sessions in and during the player introductions I told the main group "You see a shapely Bothan and runtish Gand over near a small access door." Ok we casually stroll over to see what's up. As the party approached, the Bothan started doing some semi-provocative dancing and the Gand "Throws his hat down"- it was hilarious and everyone laughed.
    The other memorable moment came when one girl in our group (Age 21, somewhat shy) who plays the face (go figure lol) for the party was watching a fight with a male NPC contact. She knew he was being dumped by his girlfriend and was trying to console him. The poor girls goes "I put my hand on his knee and start stroking...." as soon as she said that, the 4 guys (ages 21-26) start ripping up with laughter and she got incredibly red faced. It was easily the best moment of our gaming year.
    Good luck!
  13. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from whafrog in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    I really like that- that sounds fun! I agree with the posts subsequent to mine as well- know the NPC motivations- perhaps he wants credits, a drink, a job or friendship, perhaps he's really a bounty hunter in disguise who is talking up the party as a distraction.
    I do the same thing with social encounters- let the players talk and describe their actions- after all, this is supposed to be a "narrative" driven game and I do not believe it should be up to the GM to describe what the pcs are saying or doing.
    On the flip side, I have been involved with ungodly tedious social roleplaying as recently as last months August Pathfinder session. We always start playing at 4, we didn't start swinging swords till close to 9pm. My son (age 21) actually role played going to a town and getting a 3 day job to dig a ditch for 3 copper pieces a day. That was INSANELY boring!!! Surprisingly the DM, he is a couple years older than me and I thought he would have more DMing experience but apparently I was wrong.
    Social Encounters are, in my opinion, the art or lifeblood of any RPG. The technical side is knowing the rules. The "Art" and what separates the good from the great GM's are social encounters. Social encounters grow the gaming experience and add a completely new level of immersion to the game. If you compare it to real life, thing about your job or classes or whatever. Do the interesting challenges you face or really memorable moments come from crunching numbers or entering data or writing a paper or do they come from interaction with other people- good or bad.   
  14. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to Geodes in Stat levels. Is 3 enough?   
    Depending on what your play style is, raising your characteristics higher could be useful. Is three enough? Sure. Is two? Sure. It just depends on you. From what I have seen online, general practice is to invest a healthy portion of your starting XP in characteristics since you can never raise them after creation (save for Dedication talents of which you will only get one or two).
    Do you want a well-rounded character or a specialist? This is also important to know going in.
  15. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to whafrog in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Great advice above, the main thing being knowing what the NPC wants.  There is also some good advice in both Far Horizons and Desperate Allies on how to use social skill checks.  I also found this article useful:
    http://theangrygm.com/systematic-interaction/
    The meat of it, if you're not a fan of his schtick, starts at the subtitle "Keeping Social Score".  It's a way of scoring a social encounter to see whether the an NPC can be swayed.
    Adapting the above to this system, one thing I will do is defer a roll until after the PCs and NPCs have engaged in a bit of dialogue.  The PCs might say certain things (offering anything from facts to lies to flirtation) or try certain mechanical tactics (e.g. Coercion vs Charm).  I usually have an empty bowl in front of me (open to the table), and as the conversation proceeds I add boost or setbacks (or sometimes, in extreme cases, upgrades either way) to the bowl.  Once it's time to roll, these additions are incorporated into the final pool.  I find a single roll is usually good enough for a single subject matter (and there could be multiple subject matters under discussion), but there's no reason you can't have multiple rolls if a subject is complex or the stakes are high.
    The emphasis is on the dialogue, the bowl helps ramp up the tension, and the dice roll resolves the matter.
     
  16. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from ThreeAM in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Hello- I am finding that my group (8 players strong) generally wants social almost as much as combat. To them, those types of encounters really make SW come alive. I do social really really well. Here are some answers I have for your questions:
    1- take a moment to pause and think about how you would react to this type of encounter in real life. RPGs throw a quirk in there given that different races might react a lot differently than you and I would.
    2- in connection with my answer to number 1 above, try and develop (or think of) some instances where his lesser used social skills can actually be put to use.
    3- Well, I would advise you to not be- after all, failing at social encounters can generally lead to making the players actually think rather than just rolling dice. They have to formulate a plan and come up with a solution as players rather than just letting the dice do the work for them. Are you sure you aren't allowing them to fail because you prefer not to deal with social encounters and would rather just let them succeed so you can move on to the next combat? Be honest withyourself- if the answer is yes, you may be cheating them out of some memorable fun.
    I do little prep work as a GM simply because I have learned how to do really good social encounters (I have been a DM/GM for 35 years now  so time has helped! :)) I have found that you don't need to hurry up and give immediate answers, if they surprise you, take your time and be imaginative and reasonable. If you act reasonably, your players will accept your decision and go with it.
    Memorable social encounters- oh my have we ever!!! My best friend and his wife were playing a Gand merc and a Bothan Dancer. They joined our group 2-3 sessions in and during the player introductions I told the main group "You see a shapely Bothan and runtish Gand over near a small access door." Ok we casually stroll over to see what's up. As the party approached, the Bothan started doing some semi-provocative dancing and the Gand "Throws his hat down"- it was hilarious and everyone laughed.
    The other memorable moment came when one girl in our group (Age 21, somewhat shy) who plays the face (go figure lol) for the party was watching a fight with a male NPC contact. She knew he was being dumped by his girlfriend and was trying to console him. The poor girls goes "I put my hand on his knee and start stroking...." as soon as she said that, the 4 guys (ages 21-26) start ripping up with laughter and she got incredibly red faced. It was easily the best moment of our gaming year.
    Good luck!
  17. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from whafrog in How Do You Run Social Encounters?   
    Hello- I am finding that my group (8 players strong) generally wants social almost as much as combat. To them, those types of encounters really make SW come alive. I do social really really well. Here are some answers I have for your questions:
    1- take a moment to pause and think about how you would react to this type of encounter in real life. RPGs throw a quirk in there given that different races might react a lot differently than you and I would.
    2- in connection with my answer to number 1 above, try and develop (or think of) some instances where his lesser used social skills can actually be put to use.
    3- Well, I would advise you to not be- after all, failing at social encounters can generally lead to making the players actually think rather than just rolling dice. They have to formulate a plan and come up with a solution as players rather than just letting the dice do the work for them. Are you sure you aren't allowing them to fail because you prefer not to deal with social encounters and would rather just let them succeed so you can move on to the next combat? Be honest withyourself- if the answer is yes, you may be cheating them out of some memorable fun.
    I do little prep work as a GM simply because I have learned how to do really good social encounters (I have been a DM/GM for 35 years now  so time has helped! :)) I have found that you don't need to hurry up and give immediate answers, if they surprise you, take your time and be imaginative and reasonable. If you act reasonably, your players will accept your decision and go with it.
    Memorable social encounters- oh my have we ever!!! My best friend and his wife were playing a Gand merc and a Bothan Dancer. They joined our group 2-3 sessions in and during the player introductions I told the main group "You see a shapely Bothan and runtish Gand over near a small access door." Ok we casually stroll over to see what's up. As the party approached, the Bothan started doing some semi-provocative dancing and the Gand "Throws his hat down"- it was hilarious and everyone laughed.
    The other memorable moment came when one girl in our group (Age 21, somewhat shy) who plays the face (go figure lol) for the party was watching a fight with a male NPC contact. She knew he was being dumped by his girlfriend and was trying to console him. The poor girls goes "I put my hand on his knee and start stroking...." as soon as she said that, the 4 guys (ages 21-26) start ripping up with laughter and she got incredibly red faced. It was easily the best moment of our gaming year.
    Good luck!
  18. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to GandofGand in Who still owns copies of both of these?   
    I have pretty much all of the WEG D6 Books, used to have most of the Journals but lost them in one of many moves. 
    I still use them Tales of the Jedi for Source Material...8) 
  19. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to Bojanglez in Who still owns copies of both of these?   
    me! i have a crazy amount of my WEG books still taking up shelf space (alongside FFG's). The panorama makes it look wonky. I don't actually live inside a reality distortion field.

  20. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from Vestij Jai Galaar in Upping difficulty in Mask of the Pirate Queen [SPOILERS]   
    Finally got a chance to get back to this adventure after my son's terrific little league season!!
     
    Alright, we picked up right at the start of Episode 2- the team had defeated the guards at Blackwind Crater and assaulted the lair. They dispatched the Queen decoy and met up with Venalanna to discuss new options. They met Illo Vandin and decided to go to Rusty Reach (Which I was very pleased with as 1- I don't like the fight fixing scenario as much as the Rusty Reach one and 2- RR gave me a prime location to stage an ambush based on one of the PCs obsession triggers).
    The party went to RR and it was a relatively straight forward affair. I then had a bounty hunter group lay an ambush in RR. They had 2 minion BH groups assaulting a poor defenseless Ewok (God only knows how or why and ewok would be on Ord Mantell but they didn't ask !) Once they started to intervene, I sniped the "face" of the party and nailed her for 20 points and she dropped. That ticked off the hired gun and he returned the favor with 24 points of damage. He got a "Limb blown off" crit but since he had killed him I just said "you blow his head clean off" and that got the party hyped. They then dispatched the rest of the BH's and headed back to Meet Torval.
    The Torval episode was very very entertaining (so much so that some of the players are talking about YouTubing some of this part of the session! :)) Three of the players went to the bar at the Loaded Savrip and commenced to drink. The jawa demolitionist got drunk and failed his resilience check so bad he toppled off the barstool and soiled himself! poor guy. The "face" of the party is a human female (played by a 21 year old female) and she talked her way into Torval's viewbox. She played the data chip for him at which point the bodyguard left the viewbox. The party "tailed" the guard as he left while the "face" stayed with Torval in the view box. Once he left, the woman playing the character goes " I put my hand on his leg and start stroking his leg............" and as soon as she said that, the rest of the party (all twenty-something guys) just lost it and I had complete chaos at my table!   Eventually she got the information from him and the party dispatched the guard outside of the LS.
    They are currently concocting a plan to send a remote droid/drone down into the elevator shaft to scout around before they go down into it. My son said to me Sat morning "I don't think I am going to keep playing my character as everyone seems to get so mad at me when I go to do something." and I told him "That isn't your fault, that is good roleplaying- you aren't a distraction, you are playing how you believe your character would react- in addition, I am doing a good job of keeping the party tense and maintaining a sense of urgency. They only want to deal with your shenanigans when the time is right."
    So, next session is Aug 18. I'll brief you on that one.
    I do have a question- During combat, how do you handle any advantages earned beyond 3? Are they lost? Do you cap at 3? At times, I have players getting 5 and even 6 advantages on a roll and it generates this rolling wave of advantages. I was curious if anyone caps this or what you do to control the advantages in combat.
    Another question- the Jawa Demolitionist Obsession obligation triggered- any recommendations on how to work that in to Episode 3 of this module?
  21. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to splad in Who still owns copies of both of these?   
    You so so right friend I tried the EoE on a group and they hated it but when I drop aD6 game in they want more....hmmm maybe their is a contributing factor their lol. The Last WEG star wars edition was the 2nd edition revised and expanded and it just nailed it. Actually it was funny I got a player who is a rules jockey he yums that stuff up. We had a bone of contention about the combat system in the FFG version. I think it was about moving and actions and it was just one sentence of text not even include in the main body of the combat section for movement that I had to search the rules up and down for. The lack of what I call good parenting rules as far as layout is something I abhor about the FFG star wars yet I can mine their source information all day long.It just makes a perfect marriage imo to take a system that works and lend their creative writing to fleshing out the galaxy.
  22. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to flyingcircus in Who still owns copies of both of these?   
    I have the full color 3rd edition book and a ton of other d6 WEG books.  I think the reason they're releasing this is to test the waters to see if releasing further d6 stuff is worth while, as rpg companies like Modiphius are kicking FFG's *** right now.  I have a ton of FFG SW books and can't get a soul to play it, everyone says the system sucks and its just WH3 light but if I ask lets play d6 SW there all in.
  23. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to splad in Who still owns copies of both of these?   
    If only it was that simple that FFG world pull up their tent pole rpg and delve into the WEG archive. Is it possible a year ago I world have said no but look at the star wars books they have. They have nearly maxed out on companions for classes so what's left the sporadic adventure and source book. WEG was prolific in mining the star wars universe far more aptly than FFG. They won't even touch movie or novels to make sourcebook for.
  24. Like
    Currahee Chris got a reaction from splad in Who still owns copies of both of these?   
    I certainly would agree but I just don't understand why go to another game when they already have another game system out there for SW......me personally, I think it is great, as I still hold WEG as the Standard for SW RPG but it seems like taking this on might dilute their offerings of EOE, FD, Rebellion, etc.....
  25. Like
    Currahee Chris reacted to Freeptop in Who still owns copies of both of these?   
    Why do it? It's pretty much easy money, that's why. There's very little effort needed to develop this - it's primarily just a re-print, so there's some re-mastering for new printing techniques, but the writing is done, and there's no need to playtest something that's been out for 30 years. There's also a sizeable, very vocal market for this (notice all of us coming out of the woodwork, excited about it). Once they were able to acquire the rights to print this, then doing this is as near to a sure thing as you're going to get in the RPG industry.
    This is a case where FFG's desire for money and my desire for nostalgia intersect perfectly. Win-win, all-around, really!
     
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