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FranquesEnbiens

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  1. Turns out there were prequel ships that were beautiful and amazing all along and I never knew it.
  2. Also, I didn't say anything about doing it "courteously" with that being an analogue for "nicely," meaning I wasn't commenting on how the message was delivered (i.e., saying it in a nice way makes it okay). Of course, I would try to approach it nicely rather than taking an adversarial attitude toward a player. What I did say was that I viewed it as doing a courtesy, as in trying to do that player a favor.
  3. I am hoping that you just misunderstood my sentence, rather than cutting it there to take that part out of context. Let me explain. You asked: "It is okay to DQ a tactic you don't like because you did it courteously?" My entire sentence: "If I can explain why I am giving warning points based on the rules, then yes, and I would argue it's better to do that than play gotcha with warning points once an event has started." In other words, I was answering your question as: "Yes, if I can explain why I am giving warning points based on the rules." The implied reverse being that if I can't explain it based on the rules, then no, it's not okay.
  4. Letting a player know that they will receive warning points is not an automatic disqualification. At that point, it's on the player to decide if they will continue to pursue that course of action. If I can explain why I am giving warning points based on the rules, then yes, and I would argue it's better to do that than play gotcha with warning points once an event has started. My goal is to get out in front of anything that I think is a violation of the rules, not to target things that I don't personally like. I try to make rulings like that based on the best I can do at reading and understanding the rules. If you challenge me on it, and I can't justify it based on the rules, then I won't rule it that way. Basically, I am never going to hamstring myself by having to back up a ruling with a "because I said so" justification. Do I get them all right? Certainly not. But if I get them wrong, I try to do better next time. I can't make claims for how any other judge runs their events, but I try to do my best to be fair to everyone and make sure the players are as informed as possible ahead of the event. I spend several weeks preparing for Hyperspace Trials to try to ensure all of that, as well as thinking about how to best help players have a good time. When I am running an event, I make a document for players to reference that I post several weeks in advance so they can know how I will rule on things. I also give them several avenues to contact me if they have any questions about cards, rules interactions, or how I will rule on things. I research and give an answer before the event starts and add it to my document. If a player thinks I am targeting something they think is valid, or targeting them specifically, then I hope I can explain why I am not and how I am applying the rules as I see them. As far as my intent behind that, well, I just have to hope I have enough goodwill and can explain myself eloquently enough that players trust me. If they can't, then I will feel bad, but also rest assured knowing that I either did the best I could, acted as fairly as I could, or will apologize to them if I made a genuine error and try to do better next time.
  5. Let's say you, as a judge, can identify a player who is known to use a tactic that you don't allow at your event, based on how you apply the floor rules. What's more courteous: taking that player aside ahead of time to explain that the tactic in question will earn them warning points during the event, so they know what to expect beforehand, or not saying anything and starting to give warning points once they begin playing and using that tactic? To me, taking the player aside sounds like a respectful courtesy rather than an attempt to box them out of an event. I'm genuinely curious if that feels like bullying to some players, and what about it crosses that line.
  6. @JJ48 We've definitely opted to pay up front for the longer argument.
  7. You have to meet all the conditions for putting an ability or effect into the queue per page 3 Rules Ref: If Anakin does not have a stress how can he pay the force token to remove a stress token? He can not resolve the ability to remove stress. He can not pay the cost. Anakin does not meet all the requirements for the ability to be put in the queue. Anakin is the epitome of "pre-resolving" effects. That's what the change above is about. Anakin and the other Delta Jedi are exactly who this change in the queue are aimed at. It is a non-points "nerf" of the Jedi. RRG Page 2: "ABILITIES: Some of the text on condition, damage, ship, and upgrade cards describe abilities. These abilities consist of a timing and an effect." (bolding mine) A cost is not part of an ability, and being able to pay a cost or not has no bearing on whether you are allowed to place it in the queue. As you said, a cost is something that is tied to an effect. He can't. When you would resolve the ability, you would not be able to remove a stress that doesn't exist, therefore you can't pay the cost. Being able to resolve an ability has no bearing on whether it can enter the queue. Look at the examples in the RRG (bolding mine): Example 1: Jake Farrell activates and performs a [barrel roll] action. At this point, both his ship and pilot ability trigger (the requirements/conditions are that he did a boost/roll action, and did an action. Note that for his pilot ability, it does not say "he performs a barrel roll action with a friendly ship at range 0-1). He chooses the order to add them to the ability queue, adding his pilot ability first, then his ship ability. While resolving his pilot ability, he can choose a friendly ship at range 0–1. He chooses himself, and then performs a [focus] action (although Jake does meet the requirement as he is a friendly ship, he chooses the friendly ship when it resolves). This triggers his ship ability again. Now he adds the second instance of his ship ability in front of the first instance of his ship ability. While he resolves his ship ability, he performs a red [boost] action. This triggers his pilot ability and his ship ability again. He chooses to add his pilot ability first, then his ship ability. While resolving his pilot ability again, he chooses a friendly Phoenix Squadron Pilot (A-wing) at range 1. The other A-wing performs a focus action and its ship ability triggers. This is added to the front of the ability queue. Phoenix Squadron Pilot resolves its ship ability and performs a red [boost] action. The only abilities remaining in the ability queue are two instances of Jake Farrell’s ship ability. Since he is stressed, he cannot perform an action so neither ability has an effect and the ability queue empties (the ability queue has triggered abilities in it that are unable to be resolved, so that is a thing that can happen. Also, again, this separates the effect from adding the ability to the queue). There is nothing in this that states that Jake has to be able to resolve his ability to add it to the queue. For example, it doesn't say "While he resolves his ship ability, he performs a red [boost] action. Jake will be unable to resolve his ability on himself when resolving the queue, but checks for other friendly ships at range 0-1, and if there is one, he triggers his pilot ability and his ship ability again. He chooses to add his pilot ability first, then his ship ability." If the Phoenix Squadron Pilot turned out to be not at range 1, would Jake be unable to add his ability to the queue? Or would it do what the example says and just have no effect? It's similar in the second example. Although there is a valid target, the example doesn't state that Old Teroch checks for anything when adding his ability to the queue. The real crux of this is that when you say, "Anakin is the epitome of 'pre-resolving' effects," that's a problematic notion. Pre-resolving is not a thing you can do. The only thing you can do prior to resolving the entire ability queue is check for triggers and add things to it as specified. If abilities have a timing and an effect, and the effect is what happens when you resolve it, the timing is what we are looking at when adding them to the queue. So all the game instructs you to do is check the timing and add the ability as long as you can comply with any "if" conditionals as they relate to the timing. Ensnare: Timing: at the end of activation Conditional: "if you are tractored" Is it the end of activation? Am I tractored? If yes, add Ensnare to the queue. If not, don't put it in the queue. Now resolve the queue. Anakin: Timing: after you fully execute a maneuver Conditional: if there is an enemy ship in your [front arc] at range 0-1 or in your bullseye arc Did I execute a maneuver without bumping? Is there an enemy ship there? If yes, add Anakin ability to queue. If not, don't add it. Resolve the queue. Teroch: Timing: start of the engagement phase Conditional: none Is it the start of engagement? Add the ability to the queue. Resolve the queue. Jake: Timing: after you perform a boost or barrel roll Conditional: none Did I do a boost or roll? If so, add my ability to the queue. Did I not? Don't add it. Resolve the queue. Odd Ball: Timing: after you fully execute a red maneuver or perform a red action Conditional: if there is an enemy ship in your bullseye arc Is it after I did one of those things? If yes, is there an enemy ship there? If so, add it to the queue. If not, don't add it. Resolve the queue. Pinpoint Tractor Array: Timing: after you execute a maneuver Conditional: none Did I just execute a maneuver? Add the ability to the queue. Resolve the queue.
  8. For a good and thorough analysis of the whole thing (if you missed this from a couple pages ago in the Krayt thread), I'd point you to the work that @Brunas has done researching the cards that have requirements and how they work with the ability queue: Anyways, some ship ability examples. First, the only other definition/requirement of "requirement" in the rules is here: Since it's truncated, we don't get a real answer for what a requirement is. So, let's look at what a requirement might be, with a simple card like Fearless. Fearless: While you perform a primary <front arc> attack, if the attack range is 1 and you are in the defender’s <front arc> , you may change 1 of your results to a <hit> result. Clauses: A B C While (you perform a primary <front arc> attack), if (the attack range is 1 and you are in the defender’s <front arc>), you may (change 1 of your results to a <hit> result.) While A, if B, then do C All abilities follow this format - Timing, condition, and effect. Sometimes there is no condition - for example: A C Fine-tuned Controls: After (you fully execute a maneuver), you may (spend 1 <force> to perform a <boost> or <roll> action). After A, then C For Teroch, that looks like this: A C Teroch: At (the start of the Engagement Phase), you may (choose 1 enemy ship at range 1. If you do and you are in its <front arc>, it removes all of its green tokens). Here again, we only have A and C - no requirement that must be true For Anakin, who was effected by the change: A B C Anakin: After (you fully execute a maneuver), if (there is an enemy ship in your <front arc> at range 0-1 or in your <bullseye arc>,) you may (spend 1 <force> to remove 1 stress token). Again, After A, if B, then C. For example, Anakin can add his ability to the queue if he has a ship in bullseye or in front arc at r1, but is not stressed. It wouldn't do anything (not even cost a force), but it's a thing you could do. Similarly, Teroch can be added to the ability queue with nothing around him - it just does nothing (unless something makes it's way to him by the time he resolves). I've been through about 200 cards, including all of them with this phrasing (conditional if clauses), and this has held true for all of them.
  9. Honest question, not being sarcastic: Would you also argue that Old Teroch's ability requires that at the start of Engagement, something has to be in range AND HAVE a focus token for you to even add his ability to the queue? Is having a focus for him to remove an "implied requirement" since you can't remove a token they don't have?
  10. It's actually pretty simple if you look at it this way (let's say I have Anakin with Chopper, which I tried out at an HST this past weekend): I fully execute a maneuver and land at range one of a ship with Anakin. What are the things I can add to the queue at this moment (I am assuming that I am the only one triggering abilities here)? Fine-Tuned Controls, Anakin's ability, and Chopper (all trigger off executing a maneuver). I add FTC, Chopper, Anakin in that order. I try resolve FTC to barrel roll, and I either succeed or fail. I resolve Chopper to get the Evade. I try to resolve Anakin and I have a stress to remove, great! I choose to spend a force to remove the stress. Now I've finished my Execute Maneuver step, on to Perform Action. At no point does the wording "if you are stressed" appear in Anakin's ability.
  11. But again, nowhere does it say that you have to be stressed as a requirement to add the ability to the queue. If you look at the card and say "did I do the thing to add this to the queue?" and you can say "Yes," then you add it. Then it's resolved in the order it comes up in the queue. Whether it does anything at that point or not depends on if you meet the requirements when it attempts to resolve and you decide to use it. Compare it to something like Ensnare (At the end of the Activation Phase, if you are tractored, you may choose 1 ship in your [mobile] arc at range 0-1. ). The requirement is that you have to be tractored, so if not, you can't add it to the queue (as explained in the RRG: If an ability’s requirements are not met, it cannot be added to the ability queue. For example, at the start of the Engagement Phase, if a ship has an ability that requires it to be tractored, but that ship is not tractored, that ability cannot be added to the queue. The ship cannot add the ability to the queue even if another ability also added to the queue at the start of the Engagement Phase would cause that ship to become tractored upon its resolution.) It gets murky if we start using implied requirements rather than what it actually says on the card.
  12. Anakin does not have to be stressed to put his pilot ability in the queue ("After you fully execute a maneuver, if there is an enemy ship in your [front arc] at range 0-1 or in your [bullseye arc]..."). The only requirement is that you have fully executed a maneuver. So if you order the abilities (which all go in the queue at the same time) so that Anakin's pilot ability resolves after Chopper, and you meet the requirements to use Anakin after gaining the evade and the stress, you can spend the force to clear the stress.
  13. Hexiled Gaming will be live streaming and providing commentary for the Atomic Empire Hyperspace Trial this Saturday and Sunday, August 17 and 18! There will be six rounds of Swiss starting at 10:00 am EST on Saturday, and a cut starting at 10:30 am Sunday. https://www.twitch.tv/hexiledgaming https://www.youtube.com/hexiledgaming Check it out to see some of your favorite Krayts try to knock each other out of the cut!
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