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Jace911

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Everything posted by Jace911

  1. I have not found a single forum in which an Ignore function does not strike me as petty and childish. It's the equivalent of sticking your fingers in your ears and shouting "lalala I can't hear you" rather than exercising maturity and actually ignoring their posts yourself. That and there's always that guy who can't help but remind people constantly that he has certain people on ignore, often when he suspects or knows said people have posted in the thread.
  2. Ah, I see your point now. Fair.
  3. Then the obvious solution is to have the Force ratings not stack. It strikes me that this would encourage players to play Miraluka Jedi rather than Miraluka Force Exiles or Emergents (Since as you pointed out they would be wasting XP), so I would call that mission accomplished. :V
  4. Instead of Perception I would give them Cunning 1 (To reflect their reliance on the Force to perceive the world around them) and Willpower 3, as well as allowing them to start with Force Rating 1 and the base Sense power. The total XP will probably be much lower than 90 as a result, though you can lower their Wounds to 8 + Brawn to make up for it a bit. While I agree that Cunning or Willpower are better traits to move to 3 I do disagree with the idea of giving them a Force Rating and a base Force power. Giving them a Force rating of 1 makes them a go to species if you want to play a Force user but don't feel like playing an F&D career first. It allows you to skip Exile/Emergent unlike any other species and it gives you a free power when no one gets free powers. The Perception bonus seems more reasonable. I meant to specify that the costs of the Force specialization (10) and Sense power (15) would also be subtracted from their experience total. It's actually less effective than just buying them with XP, because the Miraluka are only buying a Force rating rather than access to either the Exile or Emergent tree.
  5. Instead of Perception I would give them Cunning 1 (To reflect their reliance on the Force to perceive the world around them) and Willpower 3, as well as allowing them to start with Force Rating 1 and the base Sense power. The total XP will probably be much lower than 90 as a result, though you can lower their Wounds to 8 + Brawn to make up for it a bit.
  6. The way I see it, the opponent without the Parry talent does bloc incoming blows effectively, that's why he/she is not sliced in half. It's all in the narrative. Only, he/she must spend great resources to "not die" (i.e. wounds), which the character has a finite amount. The opponent with the Parry talent spends as much resources to bloc incoming blows, but some of those come from a renewable pool of resource points (i.e. Strain). So narratively speaking, the opponent without the Parry talent parries blows just as well as the person possessing the talent, but at a greater resource cost. Except when it comes to lightsaber duels you can take one, maybe two hits from a saber before you are KTFO. That's depressingly anticlimactic, especially given the aforementioned issue where a Jedi Master with 5 ranks in lightsaber is just as easy to hit as a Force-blind child who barely knows which end of the saber to hold. There's no mechanical difference between the two because all melee attacks are Average, it's all decided with the attacker's pool. I mean yes, you can declare via narrative that those two hits happen among several attacks which were parried but in real-time it still feels very short and abrupt, and that's not dramatic at all unless your intent is to show how one duelist brutally wrecked the other, or how one got in an early lucky hit. If you tried to model the Luke and Vader duel from Empire with this system Luke wouldn't have made it out of the carbon freeze chamber, much less survived an extended duel that led to new areas and inflicted incidental wounds on both combatants. He would've made one attack and then Vader would've shanked him.
  7. Deflect is one thing, but I'm rather iffy on people needing a special Talent for the complex act of "block sword with sword". It seems rather absurd that I can have four dots in wielding a lightsaber yet be completely unable to defend myself against a similarly-armed opponent, or rather be just as defenseless as if I shut off my weapon (Melee is always Difficulty 2). For that I have a houserule dueling system where two opponents with melee weapons/lightsabers make opposed skill checks, and whoever succeeds deals Strain damage equal to the number of Successes generated (Triumphs deal Wounds). That way there's much more of the traditional back and forth, with the occasional incidental wounds from lucky hits thrown in, until one side beats the other down and either kills, maims, or disarms them.
  8. I tend to break down the Force and the dark side thusly: Fear, anger, hatred, are all base and unthinking emotions. When you attack something out of fear, that's the dark side. When you strike out in anger, that's the dark side. When you let hatred dictate your actions and cloud your judgment, that's the dark side. You are not in control, your emotions and primal instincts are. You become a tool of the dark side. Opposed to that is serenity, contemplation, and knowledge. When you are at peace you see more clearly and have more control over not only yourself, but the world around you. If you resist throwing insults back at the guy who called you a slimeball, you might realize he's upset because his son is in the hospital. If you hold back from attacking a wild animal, you might realize it's only defending its nest from an intruder and can back away without killing a mother. Resisting the impulses to act on base emotions makes you more powerful than surrendering to those emotions, but it's also more difficult because living creatures are never separate from their biological buttons and chemical urges. That's why the dark side is the quick and easy path, whereas the Force (Which I use as a term in place of the light side) takes years of study and meditation to master. Does this mean there are situations in which a Jedi can kill without risking dark side corruption? Absolutely, if he does so in defense of others. But there's a thin line to be walked between killing in self defense and killing in preemptive self defense, because the latter is heavily steeped in fear. When you fear someone might attack but don't know for sure (Because they haven't one it yet, and the future is always in motion!), acting on that fear by striking first is of the dark side. You allow your fear to dictate your response, and in so doing open yourself to the dark side.
  9. Yeah, gee, sorry if I tried to analyze the setting as an actual "reality", instead of just taking Lucas' half-baked 70's mashup of half-understood religious concepts and all the fan-wanking that's been glued onto it over the decades as holy writ. I'm interested in addressing the morality in real terms, not in any way based on "because George said so" or "because it's a story for children". Well there's your problem right there. Star Wars isn't real, and the only purpose to be served in treating it as such for thought experiments is the pursuit of immersion--something intended to further the story. But if you forgo the reality of it being a story, with the dramatic rules of a story, then what's the point of immersion? That's an actual and ongoing problem with so much of what gets put out for movies and television -- the worldbuilding playing second-fiddle to the "dramatic rules" (and/or to the spectacle). No, that's stories working as intended. You don't tell a story to build a stage, you build the stage to tell a story. Without the story the stage has no purpose other than "it looks nice I guess". It all has to make sense, each individual piece, and the whole. Furthermore, treating the worldbuilding as a contrivance that serves only as backdrop, is no more the path to good fiction than the way that too many television series treat each character as a package of notable quirks who can otherwise be whatever "the story" for this week's episode demands. The world is as much a character as the protagonist or the antagonist or any other. I'm not sure why you're acting like I'm defending whatever sh*tty TV series you're obliquely referencing. Please stop putting words in my mouth and focus on the ones that are actually coming out. "World building" is a process in which you set the stage for a story, not the actual story itself. When you start favoring the development of the world over the development of the characters--the actual agents of the story--then you're no longer telling a story, you're showing off fluff. Fluff is nice, but it does not make a story. When Obi-Wan talks about the Clone Wars in A New Hope he doesn't spend twenty minutes giving Luke a history lesson, he presents everyone with the relevant bits as demanded by the story. When Han boasts that the Millennium Falcon made the Kessel Run in twelve parsecs he doesn't go on and on about all his other impressive accomplishments that are irrelevant to the plot. We explore these things later, in other stories, but they do not overshadow or even equal the story of Luke Skywalker. They support it.
  10. Improvise, improvise, improvise. You're going to have a map in your head of how the game is going to go, and inevitably the players will wander off the edge. That's okay so long as you're ready to scribble a new one underneath them as they walk off into the uncharted, and it can actually lead to some interesting developments that surprise even you. The best way to do this is to have a lot of free-floating elements--locales, characters, events, etc--which aren't tied down to a specific plot event and can be tossed in as needed. Come up with a cool bounty hunter character who can pursue the players if they do something illegal. Draft up a starport town in the middle of nowhere they might wander into. Better yet, take the elements you already have waiting in the wings for whatever plot you've prepared and repurpose them: they didn't cross paths with the Inquisitor because they didn't break into the Imperial Base, so instead he comes after them when a Jedi artifact falls into their lap. At the end of each session make sure you've got notes on all the major events that happened, with enough little details so that you can take that and modify your game to suit it. Change the trajectory based on where the players seem to be headed rather than trying to forcibly course-correct them back to where you want.
  11. Well if he's known to the Empire I would assume the Moff would be rather sore about losing a case against a suspected Rebel, so he'd look up dirt on this defense lawyer and find out he was an Imperial deserter and a member of Black Sun. From there it's either blackmail (Plant evidence convicting the Rebel of some other crime so I can nail him on that) or he calls the Empire down on them.
  12. Yeah, I hate when RPG designers don't make appointments with NASA to discuss the engineering details of their make-believe starships in their space fantasy setting. So silly. Strawman much? There's a lot of space between "who cares it if can land or fly straight, as long as it looks kewl" and "make sure NASA approves". It's a setting with space magic and 70's scifi technology. If it has a funky wing then that's because the design called for a funky wing. Simple as that. Holding the artists to any kind of IRL engineering standards is patently absurd. And who cares if it can't land or fly in a straight line? Yeah, who would put the cockpit of a cargo ship way offset from it's center of mass? How do they expect the pilot to fly the **** thing?
  13. Yeah, that's fair. So Defensive 1-2, Unwieldy 3, and possibly a Fear check the first time someone sees it used.
  14. Yeah, gee, sorry if I tried to analyze the setting as an actual "reality", instead of just taking Lucas' half-baked 70's mashup of half-understood religious concepts and all the fan-wanking that's been glued onto it over the decades as holy writ. I'm interested in addressing the morality in real terms, not in any way based on "because George said so" or "because it's a story for children". Well there's your problem right there. Star Wars isn't real, and the only purpose to be served in treating it as such for thought experiments is the pursuit of immersion--something intended to further the story. But if you forgo the reality of it being a story, with the dramatic rules of a story, then what's the point of immersion? That's an actual and ongoing problem with so much of what gets put out for movies and television -- the worldbuilding playing second-fiddle to the "dramatic rules" (and/or to the spectacle). No, that's stories working as intended. You don't tell a story to build a stage, you build the stage to tell a story. Without the story the stage has no purpose other than "it looks nice I guess".
  15. Yeah, I hate when RPG designers don't make appointments with NASA to discuss the engineering details of their make-believe starships in their space fantasy setting. So silly. Strawman much? There's a lot of space between "who cares it if can land or fly straight, as long as it looks kewl" and "make sure NASA approves". It's a setting with space magic and 70's scifi technology. If it has a funky wing then that's because the design called for a funky wing. Simple as that. Holding the artists to any kind of IRL engineering standards is patently absurd.
  16. The spinning effect seems to be more than just intimidation, though. I mean yes it's frightening for your opponent's blade to suddenly start spinning like a buzzsaw but it also makes it very difficult to actually pin the **** thing down and deflect the repeated blows, as seen in Ezra's hallucination of the Inquisitor killing Kanan. It also seems like it would make blaster fire deflection easier so long as the blades are spinning fast enough, so in the end I think I'd give the saber Deflection 1/Defensive 1 when spinning, along with Unwieldy 3 to reflect how careful you have to be to use it in that mode.
  17. Yeah, gee, sorry if I tried to analyze the setting as an actual "reality", instead of just taking Lucas' half-baked 70's mashup of half-understood religious concepts and all the fan-wanking that's been glued onto it over the decades as holy writ. I'm interested in addressing the morality in real terms, not in any way based on "because George said so" or "because it's a story for children". Well there's your problem right there. Star Wars isn't real, and the only purpose to be served in treating it as such for thought experiments is the pursuit of immersion--something intended to further the story. But if you forgo the reality of it being a story, with the dramatic rules of a story, then what's the point of immersion?
  18. On the plus side this also means that you'll be able to shine the spotlight on either character more than you would with a large group, so keep that in mind and definitely capitalize on it!
  19. Out of curiosity how did you rewrite it? I came to the same conclusion myself while previewing it for later use in my campaign, and I decided Harsol would approach them alone on foot to talk while the rest of his men and droids were concealed in the trees covering him. Strikes a decent balance between Harsol not being an idiot while also not having him be paranoid to the point where there's no possibility for peaceful exchange, and still offering the opportunity for a decent combat encounter if things go sideways.
  20. Mechanically I suppose that would increase the difficulty of checks made to disarm you? I've also always wanted to see a rapier-style lightsaber hilt.
  21. Yeah, I hate when RPG designers don't make appointments with NASA to discuss the engineering details of their make-believe starships in their space fantasy setting. So silly.
  22. I actually really like the idea of lightsaber decorations and I'm definitely going to be stealing some of the suggestions in this thread! As for the OP... For Jedi characters making a lightsaber is a big deal. It's the culmination of their training and commitment to the Jedi (In whatever flavor they follow) and as such can serve as a symbol of everything that led the character to that point. To reinforce this, I would suggest that you think of three major milestones in your character's past that had a serious impact on them and then consider what sort of artifacts or talismans they could incorporate into the saber to reflect those events. The Twi'lek girlfriend's leather lekku bindings are a great idea. Another one could be their holotags from the Sector Rangers wrapped around the handle or hooked to the base of the hilt, or some sort of small keepsake left to them by their parents.
  23. Call me a purist, but I very much disagree with the idea of trying to put horror in Star Wars. Fear is of course an integral part of the genre and is absolutely necessary--you can't have stakes if nobody's afraid of the bad guy--but actual horror is all about being rendered powerless, whether physically or mentally, and that runs pretty counter to the romantic heroism at the core of Star Wars. If that seems confusing, here's an example: In Empire Strikes Back, Luke finds himself face to face with Darth Vader. This is the monster who murdered his father, his mentor, and his best friend. This is the creature who captured and tortured his friends just to lure him out. This is the Dark Lord of the Empire. Luke should and on some level probably is terrified, but he still puts on a brave face and draws his lightsaber to face Vader. In a horror situation, Luke wouldn't have had the saber. His only real option would have been to flee like a cluefree college kid from a slasher villain. Horror is the feeling that comes when you are stripped of the agency to act on your fear. Star Wars revolves around characters who are afraid but rise to the challenge and act in spite of their fear. The two don't really blend together.
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