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FinarinPanjoro

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  1. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from IndianaWalsh in Superpowers   
    I just ran my first supers game using your rule set.  It was awesome!  Thank you so much!
    I am having one difficulty though (and I had this with the Star Wars Move Power as well).  Hitting someone with a large object (via Telekinesis, Strength, or Size Manipulation) is the most damaging attack available in the game.  It trumps everything else at personal scale and has no drawbacks that I can see.  I'm trying to come up with some modified rules that don't make hitting someone with a silo 3+ object an instant win.
    Here's what I'm considering:
    You must upgrade the difficulty of the attack once for each silhouette the object is greater than yours (it's unwieldy, likely to collapse under its own weight, easy to see coming, etc). If you are in an interior space you add one setback die for each silhouette the object is larger than the intended occupants (reduce by one if in an appropriately large room). You may elect to eliminate both of these penalties by having the attack inflict Blast on a successful hit doing damage equal to your Brawn plus the object's silhouette plus uncancelled successes.  If the object is silhouette 4 or more blast effects all within short range.  You may activate blast with this attack with a triumph or 3 advantage even on a failed check.  Most objects are destroyed by this attack method. What do you all think?
  2. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from GroggyGolem in House ruling use of silhouette 2+ objects as weapons   
    Hey all,
    I'm running some superhero adventures using Genesys and have encountered a problem that I also ran into in the Star Wars RPG (via the Move Power).  The use of silhouette 2+ objects as weapons.
    This is an extremely powerful ability which super powered individuals frequently have (through super strength, telekinesis, becoming giant sized, etc).  The amount of damage inflicted (10x silhouette plus successes) makes this a virtual one shot kill option.  In the Superpowers thread here, I've been suggesting some alternative rules or mitigations and wanted to open the discussion to a wider audience.
    One suggestion put forth by GroggyGolem (thank you!) was to change the damage increment to 5, but I feel that just pushes the problem up one tier.  A size 3 object still does 20+successes, is still pretty much an instant kill, and still only affects one target despite being the size of a Mack Truck.
    So here are some options I've proposed:
    One set of options:
    You must upgrade the difficulty of the attack once for each silhouette the object is greater than yours (it's unwieldy, likely to collapse under its own weight, easy to see coming, etc). If you are in an interior space you add one setback die for each silhouette the object is larger than the intended occupants (reduce by one if in an appropriately large room). You may elect to eliminate both of these penalties by having the attack inflict Blast on a successful hit doing damage equal to your Brawn plus the object's silhouette plus uncancelled successes instead of the normal 10x silhouette damage.  If the object is silhouette 4 or more blast effects all within short range.  You may activate blast with this attack with a triumph or 3 advantage even on a failed check.  Most objects are destroyed by this attack method. Alternative Thought:
    What if large objects were treated as doing Brawn plus Silhouette damage, but also have linked equal to silhouette?  This would require more advantage to make devastating and allow soak to apply to each activation of linked.
    Or it could be treated as Auto-fire and even increase the difficulty once (which would also allow the damage to be spread to multiple targets instead of using Blast to do this) and make it comparable to what a Super-being with energy projection/auto-fire upgrade can accomplish in one round.
    I've also thought about allowing a defensive roll like the Coordination check that allows you to mitigate falling damage.
    Any thoughts on any of these ideas?  Does anyone have any other suggestions, ideas they've tried in SWRPG, or new ideas?
    Thanks!
  3. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from mwknowles in How to handle traps?   
    Here's how I'm going to try it in my next game (which is heavily Indiana Jones themed- so traps are a must).  Many thanks to the Angry DM as this was inspired by his article on traps.
    They may actively search for traps with a Perception Check.  Typically I will give a description that indicates searching for traps might be a good idea (even if it's just to say you have a feeling).  If they succeed they may avoid the trap if they can go around it or attempt to disarm it either through a skill check (typically Skullduggery) or clever actions (putting a ladder across a pit to create a crude bridge, etc).
    If they trigger a trap, I describe some form of warning they get before it is triggered (examples below).  They may then choose a Vigilance check to avoid it's effects (typically the same difficulty as the Perception check plus a Setback Die) or they may describe their reaction to the clues I have given.  If they respond well they avoid the effects of the trap entirely, if they respond in a way that wouldn't matter they still make the Vigilance check, if they respond in a way that's really bad for the situation they upgrade the difficulty of the Vigilance check.
    Here's an important factor, try to familiarize the players with the traps before they trigger them. Either by showing them to them (already triggered by someone else), letting them make a knowledge check to have heard of them, or finding a less well hidden version of the same trap.
    Here's some examples I'm going to use in the coming adventure:
    Traps

    Per Diff

    Effect

    Skul Diff

    Catapult Snare

    dd

    Target lifted to short height and dropped (10/10)

    NA

    Impaling Swing Arm

    cd

    CCD attack, 8/2, delivers Hamstrung on Crit.

    cd

    Hail of Arrows

    ddd

    CCD attack, 7/3, Blast 6

    cdb

    Catapult Snare: feel the rock wobble and pull under your foot, Jump upwards with both feet as soon as you feel the stone wobble to avoid the effect.

    Impaling Swing Arm: hear a woosh through the trees below your waist height, block with something strong vertically (rifle held vertically, a shield) at thigh level as soon as you hear the woosh.

    Hail of Arrows: feel a trip wire pull and hear a click to your side, dive prone to avoid the arrows.


    My players were already exposed to these traps in a previous adventure so hopefully they'll respond well.
  4. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from pocket-contents in Shadow of the Beanstalk one-sheet adventure: 'The Clone Flu'   
    Nice job!  Interesting premise, nice twists, and lots of directions the ending can go in.  An excellent offering! Thank you!
  5. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Roderz in Character making checks for the team   
    For Stealth, I have allowed them to aid each other by sharing successes.  I have also used this for something like Athletics if they're climbing a cliff as a group.  I use this anytime they are in a situation where if one of them fails, all of them fail.
    They all make the check against the difficulty and then they can share successes.  So as long as there is one success left for each player at the end, they pass the check.
    For example, using Stealth.  If the sneak rolls 3 successes, the intellectual rolls 1 failure, and the average guy gets 1 success, the group succeeds at the Stealth check.  This is because the sneak can give two successes to the Intellectual, cancel their failure, and leave them with 1 success (while retaining one success for himself).  In some cases, if appropriate I allow them to use skilled assistance for these checks as well (so maybe the sneak shares his two skill ranks with the Intellectual to shore up their weakest link).
    This allows you to apply setback and boost dice normally to each person (and account for talents that remove setbacks for those who have them).  They can also use advantage etc to boost each other on the checks and so on, but threat can also penalize their allies.
    I've used it for Athletics and Stealth for sure, I can envision using it for Coordination in some cases (they all have to walk a narrow ledge).  In harsh environments I could see doing Survival to forage for food this way (if they don't succeed enough for everyone then they don't have enough to eat).
  6. Thanks
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from DavidJDance in Character making checks for the team   
    For Stealth, I have allowed them to aid each other by sharing successes.  I have also used this for something like Athletics if they're climbing a cliff as a group.  I use this anytime they are in a situation where if one of them fails, all of them fail.
    They all make the check against the difficulty and then they can share successes.  So as long as there is one success left for each player at the end, they pass the check.
    For example, using Stealth.  If the sneak rolls 3 successes, the intellectual rolls 1 failure, and the average guy gets 1 success, the group succeeds at the Stealth check.  This is because the sneak can give two successes to the Intellectual, cancel their failure, and leave them with 1 success (while retaining one success for himself).  In some cases, if appropriate I allow them to use skilled assistance for these checks as well (so maybe the sneak shares his two skill ranks with the Intellectual to shore up their weakest link).
    This allows you to apply setback and boost dice normally to each person (and account for talents that remove setbacks for those who have them).  They can also use advantage etc to boost each other on the checks and so on, but threat can also penalize their allies.
    I've used it for Athletics and Stealth for sure, I can envision using it for Coordination in some cases (they all have to walk a narrow ledge).  In harsh environments I could see doing Survival to forage for food this way (if they don't succeed enough for everyone then they don't have enough to eat).
  7. Thanks
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Roderz in Chasing cars and such   
    Yes!  I have done this one time.  It was a chase between a pick up truck (the PCs: 1 driving, two in the bed, and an npc in the passenger seat), 3 cars (3 minion bad guys each) and 3 motorcycles (1 rival each).  My setting was 1938- Think Indiana Jones.
    The PCs did remarkably little shooting at vehicles (all had armor 0).  I ruled that any bullet hit could inflict a crit on a vehicle with triumph or enough advantage.  But to inflict actual hull trauma it had to do 10 points of damage or they could spend a Triumph to have it inflict 1 point of Hull Trauma instead of the crit.  But they all chose to shoot the bad guys instead of the vehicles so we never used this.
    With one exception, one of the cars closed to engaged range and one of the PCs wanted to shoot out its tire.  So I had him use an aim maneuver adding two setbacks.  He succeeded and I dropped the car out of the chase.
  8. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from kaosoe in Are Clones short changed?   
    <facepalm>  Can't believe I didn't read that as they get rank 1 AND rank 2 in two skills.  I was thinking they had to pick a rank 1 skill as a career skill then could take the next as rank 2.  Didn't realize they could get 2 ranks in any two skills (plus all career picks).
    Now it makes sense.  Thanks for the clarity HappyDaze.
  9. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from TheSapient in Character making checks for the team   
    For Stealth, I have allowed them to aid each other by sharing successes.  I have also used this for something like Athletics if they're climbing a cliff as a group.  I use this anytime they are in a situation where if one of them fails, all of them fail.
    They all make the check against the difficulty and then they can share successes.  So as long as there is one success left for each player at the end, they pass the check.
    For example, using Stealth.  If the sneak rolls 3 successes, the intellectual rolls 1 failure, and the average guy gets 1 success, the group succeeds at the Stealth check.  This is because the sneak can give two successes to the Intellectual, cancel their failure, and leave them with 1 success (while retaining one success for himself).  In some cases, if appropriate I allow them to use skilled assistance for these checks as well (so maybe the sneak shares his two skill ranks with the Intellectual to shore up their weakest link).
    This allows you to apply setback and boost dice normally to each person (and account for talents that remove setbacks for those who have them).  They can also use advantage etc to boost each other on the checks and so on, but threat can also penalize their allies.
    I've used it for Athletics and Stealth for sure, I can envision using it for Coordination in some cases (they all have to walk a narrow ledge).  In harsh environments I could see doing Survival to forage for food this way (if they don't succeed enough for everyone then they don't have enough to eat).
  10. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from TheSapient in Fillable Character Sheet   
    This is great!  Thank you!
  11. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Sturn in How to handle traps?   
    Here's how I'm going to try it in my next game (which is heavily Indiana Jones themed- so traps are a must).  Many thanks to the Angry DM as this was inspired by his article on traps.
    They may actively search for traps with a Perception Check.  Typically I will give a description that indicates searching for traps might be a good idea (even if it's just to say you have a feeling).  If they succeed they may avoid the trap if they can go around it or attempt to disarm it either through a skill check (typically Skullduggery) or clever actions (putting a ladder across a pit to create a crude bridge, etc).
    If they trigger a trap, I describe some form of warning they get before it is triggered (examples below).  They may then choose a Vigilance check to avoid it's effects (typically the same difficulty as the Perception check plus a Setback Die) or they may describe their reaction to the clues I have given.  If they respond well they avoid the effects of the trap entirely, if they respond in a way that wouldn't matter they still make the Vigilance check, if they respond in a way that's really bad for the situation they upgrade the difficulty of the Vigilance check.
    Here's an important factor, try to familiarize the players with the traps before they trigger them. Either by showing them to them (already triggered by someone else), letting them make a knowledge check to have heard of them, or finding a less well hidden version of the same trap.
    Here's some examples I'm going to use in the coming adventure:
    Traps

    Per Diff

    Effect

    Skul Diff

    Catapult Snare

    dd

    Target lifted to short height and dropped (10/10)

    NA

    Impaling Swing Arm

    cd

    CCD attack, 8/2, delivers Hamstrung on Crit.

    cd

    Hail of Arrows

    ddd

    CCD attack, 7/3, Blast 6

    cdb

    Catapult Snare: feel the rock wobble and pull under your foot, Jump upwards with both feet as soon as you feel the stone wobble to avoid the effect.

    Impaling Swing Arm: hear a woosh through the trees below your waist height, block with something strong vertically (rifle held vertically, a shield) at thigh level as soon as you hear the woosh.

    Hail of Arrows: feel a trip wire pull and hear a click to your side, dive prone to avoid the arrows.


    My players were already exposed to these traps in a previous adventure so hopefully they'll respond well.
  12. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from ardoyle in [Input Request] Players "Push it to the limit" Rule   
    Seems like a perfect place to say "Okay, the increased risk grants you an automatic triumph if you succeed, but automatic despair if you fail".
    This is a talent in the Star Wars Hotshot tree- but I've used it in other instances to illustrate high risk/high reward events.
  13. Like
    FinarinPanjoro reacted to The Grand Falloon in Chase Rules, Actions/Maneuvers, & Initiative   
    I call for competitive checks at the end of each round, but really, either way works.  Initiative works as usual, and you have your full set of actions and maneuvers, but you can't use Maneuvers to move between range bands.  I do allow maneuvers to add a Boost die to the Chase check, which can help keep low Athletics or Piloting folks in the chase.
       So, as a one-round example, Hank, Dale and Bill are chasing the hoversled.  The chase begins in a mostly empty hangar bay at Short range, but will soon continue into the crowded streets.  All three of our heroes are running (which I call Speed 0), while the hoversled is driving, currently also Speed 0, but with a top speed of 1.  Dale is pretty fast, so he spends one maneuver to draw his pistol, his action to shoot, and will rely on his Athletics to keep up.  Bill is pretty slow, so he's spending both maneuvers to Boost his Chase check.  Hank isn't all that fast, but he knows his way around.  He spends a maneuver to boost his Chase check, and decides to try to find a shortcut.  The GM calls for a Streetwise check.  The minions on the sled shoot, while the pilot Accelerates to Speed 1 with a maneuver, then uses another to Boost his Chase check.
       So we get to the end of the round, make out Chase checks, which in open terrain is a simple check, no difficulty.  Dale gets 1 success and 3 Advantage, while Bill gets 1 success, 2 Advantage. Hank succeeded on his previous Streetwise check with a Triumph.  He wants to spend the success to come out of an alleyway ahead of the sled as it pulls into the streets, which the GM says will add a Difficulty die to the Sled's Chase check.  Hank spends the Triumph to Upgrade his own Chase check, and he gets an impressive 4 successes.  The Minion group doesn't roll, as they're passengers, while the Pilot rolls two successes and an advantage, against that single difficulty.  But wait!  The sled is at Speed 1.  I treat Current speed as "bonus successes" after a roll, so we call it three successes (Yes, in Open Terrain, speed is king, but just wait).  So as the chase moves into the crowded streets, the Sled has increased the distance from Dale and Bill to Medium, but Hank has leapt out and may Engage the sled.
      Now here's where the trouble begins.  When you have to dodge things like asteroids and pedestrians, Speed and Size become a liability.  You take half your silhouette, rounded up, and your speed.  The higher of the two is your difficulty, the lower is how many times you upgrade the difficulty.  So for a Human at speed 0, that will just be Difficulty 1, with 2 Black Setback due to the crowd.  The sled is Silhouette 2, 1 Difficulty, at Speed 1,  one Upgrade.  So he's rolling 1 Red, 2 Black.  And if he fails, he has to reduce his speed by 1, so it won't even help him out.  If he gets a Despair, he's crashed into something and the vehicle will suffer a crit. Since Hank has closed and Engaged the sled, he may try to leap aboard and grapple with the pilot.  He may try to knock him out, or just keep him from steering properly, making his check harder and offering Dale and Bill a chance to catch up.
  14. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Vrussk in Starship combat house rules   
    You've got some interesting ideas.
    One that we've tried and tested for multiple battles is increasing the advantage needed to activate linked (or autofire in personal combat) by the number of red dice rolled to hit the target.
    So an X-Wing that is at high speed and performing evasive maneuvers might have 2 red dice in its defensive pool.  When the TIE Fighter shooting it hits he needs 4 advantage to activate linked with his lasers (2 base plus 2 for the defensive upgrades).   This has had the effect of making starfighter combat much less instantly lethal for PCs and named NPCs while allowing minion groups to be plowed through.  The high cost of activating also makes it easier to choose to spend the advantage on something else (like a crit which is more interesting if ultimately less effective than doubling damage).
    We also do use the "snap roll" rules allowing the pilot to spend 3 systems strain to reduce damage from a single hit by ranks in piloting.  It's been very well received.
  15. Thanks
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from dresdinseven in [Input Request] Players "Push it to the limit" Rule   
    Seems like a perfect place to say "Okay, the increased risk grants you an automatic triumph if you succeed, but automatic despair if you fail".
    This is a talent in the Star Wars Hotshot tree- but I've used it in other instances to illustrate high risk/high reward events.
  16. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from arMedBeta in [Input Request] Players "Push it to the limit" Rule   
    Seems like a perfect place to say "Okay, the increased risk grants you an automatic triumph if you succeed, but automatic despair if you fail".
    This is a talent in the Star Wars Hotshot tree- but I've used it in other instances to illustrate high risk/high reward events.
  17. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Rimsen in Leadership skill   
    Also if your GM uses the Mass Combat rules from AOR- Leadership can have a huge impact on large scale battles.
    I allow my PCs to maintain command of a larger force by expending a maneuver every turn even if they take part in a more specific small scale encounter.
  18. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Dayham in Takodana - Maz and Jyn   
    This point comes up a lot about this movie, but doesn't Poe's rogue plan totally justify her NOT sharing her plan?  Events suggest that if she had shared it and anyone disagreed with it (which seems likely) that they would have enacted a rogue mission of their own and jeopardized everything (exactly like what happened).  Her senior staff was clearly NOT a secure group for that information and she apparently was smart enough to know that.  (And in a resistance they don't have the option of picking only the best people they have to take who they can get- flaws and all).
    Just my two cents.
  19. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from HistoryGuy in The Rule of Two is really silly, and I just realized why.   
    Wasn't the rule of two also a means of remaining in hiding from the Jedi for centuries, allowing them to grow complacent while the knowledge of the Sith was secretly passed on?
    And thus the reason it could be abandoned once Darth Sidious plan was nearing fruition (leading to Ventress, the Inquisitors, etc) who are not Sith lords but could potentially become Sith some day.
  20. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Archlyte in The Rule of Two is really silly, and I just realized why.   
    Wasn't the rule of two also a means of remaining in hiding from the Jedi for centuries, allowing them to grow complacent while the knowledge of the Sith was secretly passed on?
    And thus the reason it could be abandoned once Darth Sidious plan was nearing fruition (leading to Ventress, the Inquisitors, etc) who are not Sith lords but could potentially become Sith some day.
  21. Thanks
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Mychal'el in Mass Combat Rules for NPC rescue? (Genesys)   
    You've got a lot of opportunities, but the problem you'll be facing is that sitting in a raft is an inherently slow activity.
    You can use leadership checks to fight passenger panic, Survival or Perception checks to help with navigation, Survival checks to maximize resources (food), Resilience checks to deal with exposure, lack of food, dehydration, etc.  You can apply setbacks for these conditions too and use skill checks to remove them (so maybe a Resilience check lets you remove the setbacks for starvation and exhaustion so you can make the leadership check to fight the passengers panic).
    But I think your most dramatic element is the passengers.  Introduce something unexpected by giving some of the passengers agendas that conflict with safely reaching shore.  Here are some quick examples just off the top of my head:
    Mistrust- some rival npc(s) decides he doesn't trust the PCs or the plane crews judgment and tries to take over or take his raft in the wrong direction. Smuggling- one or more of the passengers has something dangerous that they're smuggling that becomes a threat. Criminal- one or more of the passengers was fleeing the law and fears being arrested if he makes landfall with the others. Medical Challenge- one of the passengers has a seizure or goes into cardiac arrest. Panic- some of the passengers panic and begin behaving dangerously (like believing if they throw someone to the sharks they'll be satisfied and go away). Sounds like an interesting scenario.  Good luck!
  22. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Matt Skywalker in When the PCs use the window not the door   
    My players needed to evacuate about 40,000 Wookiee slaves from a work labor camp on an Imperial occupied world.  Rather than find a way around the Star Destroyer hovering over the capital city they decided it was the perfect transport for this large crowd of Wookiees.  So they came up with and executed a plan to steal the Star Destroyer (luckily this was announced with plenty of time for me to plan for it, but it was absolutely not what I had in mind).
    They succeeded in faking a reactor failure that evacuated the ship, but Imperial protocol is that a skeleton crew of 2,000 plus 500 stormtroopers remain aboard to try to save the ship until the last possible second and to ensure that it is destroyed rather than captured.  When the PCs, who had taken the bridge, gave the order for the skeleton crew to evacuate, the 500 stormtroopers followed their protocol to seize the bridge if such an order was issued (since they were all expected to die an evacuation order was seen as a clear indication of foul play).  They were having a great last stand moment on the bridge in a potentially very lethal fight when the pilot PC remembered she'd been carting around a thermal detonator that we had all forgotten about from like 12 adventures back.  She threw it out into the corridor the stormtroopers were using as their primary approach and wiped out a massive number of them, making the dramatic final battle a cake walk (they only had to hold them off long enough for rebel reinforcements to board the ship and come to their aid).
  23. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from ASCI Blue in When the PCs use the window not the door   
    My players needed to evacuate about 40,000 Wookiee slaves from a work labor camp on an Imperial occupied world.  Rather than find a way around the Star Destroyer hovering over the capital city they decided it was the perfect transport for this large crowd of Wookiees.  So they came up with and executed a plan to steal the Star Destroyer (luckily this was announced with plenty of time for me to plan for it, but it was absolutely not what I had in mind).
    They succeeded in faking a reactor failure that evacuated the ship, but Imperial protocol is that a skeleton crew of 2,000 plus 500 stormtroopers remain aboard to try to save the ship until the last possible second and to ensure that it is destroyed rather than captured.  When the PCs, who had taken the bridge, gave the order for the skeleton crew to evacuate, the 500 stormtroopers followed their protocol to seize the bridge if such an order was issued (since they were all expected to die an evacuation order was seen as a clear indication of foul play).  They were having a great last stand moment on the bridge in a potentially very lethal fight when the pilot PC remembered she'd been carting around a thermal detonator that we had all forgotten about from like 12 adventures back.  She threw it out into the corridor the stormtroopers were using as their primary approach and wiped out a massive number of them, making the dramatic final battle a cake walk (they only had to hold them off long enough for rebel reinforcements to board the ship and come to their aid).
  24. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Sarone in When the PCs use the window not the door   
    My players needed to evacuate about 40,000 Wookiee slaves from a work labor camp on an Imperial occupied world.  Rather than find a way around the Star Destroyer hovering over the capital city they decided it was the perfect transport for this large crowd of Wookiees.  So they came up with and executed a plan to steal the Star Destroyer (luckily this was announced with plenty of time for me to plan for it, but it was absolutely not what I had in mind).
    They succeeded in faking a reactor failure that evacuated the ship, but Imperial protocol is that a skeleton crew of 2,000 plus 500 stormtroopers remain aboard to try to save the ship until the last possible second and to ensure that it is destroyed rather than captured.  When the PCs, who had taken the bridge, gave the order for the skeleton crew to evacuate, the 500 stormtroopers followed their protocol to seize the bridge if such an order was issued (since they were all expected to die an evacuation order was seen as a clear indication of foul play).  They were having a great last stand moment on the bridge in a potentially very lethal fight when the pilot PC remembered she'd been carting around a thermal detonator that we had all forgotten about from like 12 adventures back.  She threw it out into the corridor the stormtroopers were using as their primary approach and wiped out a massive number of them, making the dramatic final battle a cake walk (they only had to hold them off long enough for rebel reinforcements to board the ship and come to their aid).
  25. Like
    FinarinPanjoro got a reaction from Sturn in NPCs vs Group checks   
    Oh, and it also rewards party members for taking a rank or two in oft used group skills (like Stealth or Athletics) even if they're non-career skills, because if everyone has a rank or two those group skill checks suddenly succeed a lot more often.
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