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Kaigen

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  1. Like
    Kaigen reacted to salamar_dree in Tricky Target and Barrel Roll   
    You don't need a special talent to narrate a missed attack.
    It's narrative. I've used such descriptions before either of those talents were published.
  2. Like
    Kaigen reacted to KungFuFerret in Roleplaying Morality Shifting - My Thoughts   
    So, a common issue that I notice, in any game that presents a morality system to it's mechanics, is people confused about what the numbers mean, and how it impacts their game.  FFG is no different, in fact, it's kind of amusing to me, how nearly identical the conversation is on this subject, when I compare them to the old World of Darkness debates about their Morality system.    What commonly comes up is some variation on "Well I don't think my PC should have to behave this way because they did an action that I personally don't think is bad, so it should therefore have zero impact on them at all emotionally/psychologically."   Regardless of the action, this is what commonly comes up.  "I don't think just because a dice came up with a certain result, that my character should behave differently."  Which I personally find odd, since nobody ever says "I don't think my PC should miss that attack, just because the dice came up with a certain result."  As if combat is the only thing that is outside of a persons control or influence.  
    But anyway, I digress.   Roleplaying the change.   
    A lot of people seem to struggle with trying to figure out how the number shift, positive or negative, reflects on their PC's behavior.  "My morality went from 55 to 45, am I Hannibal Lector now?!"  or "I brought my morality up from 36 to 55, am I a saint now?!"  or some variant thereof.   It's actually really simple, the mechanics are far more elegant than I think a lot of people give them credit for.  
    So, you have a PC, they do something morally questionable, and thus earned conflict.  For the moment, this doesn't need to have any immediate impact on their behavior, but it can if you want.  Most don't in my experience, and play their characters as being 100% ok with frequent, and multiple deaths at their hands, when the reality is that most "normal, stable" humans do not just shrug off killing another sentient being, and it is in fact very difficult to convince them to do so without significant training.   But if you are going to try and have the PC have an immediate impact to their Conflict, just consider how most people would react, or how they are usually shown reacting in films/entertainment.   The quiet office worker, forced to shoot someone in self-defense, or to defend a friend.  The usually are in shock, hyperventilate, slow to respond to outside stimuli, maybe even throw up.  That's a visual, narrative depiction of someone who just gained Conflict for killing someone.  Have them react like that if it's their first time, and then keep that in mind for the end of the session when they roll their Morality.  If they break even, or go up in Morality, and this is the key thing I think most people mistake it doesn't mean they weren't effected, and thus don't care about their actions.   If they do something, and they don't see a problem with it, that's the LOSS of Morality reaction, or at least one way to reflect it.   
    But back to the example:
    Joe PeeSee, has just put a blaster bolt through a thug in an ally, to protect his best friend from certain death, and thus gains a few points of Conflict.  He's shaken, visibly distraught, and trying to come to terms with his conflicting emotions and rational brain, trying to process the events.  Then, later on, at the end of the episode, he's sitting in his room, considering what happened.  Maybe his friend comes in to talk about it, knowing how his friend would likely take killing someone.  They have a heartfelt scene, friend leaves the room, Joe PeeSee looks at his reflection in the mirror, or at some object thoughtfully....cue credits, and roll Morality.    And in this example, they happen to end up with a positive result.  Now, this isn't roleplayed as someone who isn't phased by their actions, quite the opposite.  They ARE phased, but they have found a non-destructive way to cope with it.  They perhaps try and "pay it forward" by helping others in small but significant ways in the future.  Perhaps they make a point to learn non-lethal methods of combat, so they have more options in the future.  Maybe they rededicate themselves to their personal ideal, and try and learn from how they handled it the first time.   They are still sad by what happened, perhaps even having nightmares about it with some regularity.  Maybe they even do a little drinking binge immediately after to try and "self-medicate".  But the difference is in the final result.  At the end of that drinking binge, they don't suddenly use it constantly to avoid the problem (that would be a loss of Morality option, but one of many), instead they would end up deciding the answer wasn't at the bottom of a bottle, but somewhere "out there."  And they stumble off back to the ship to sleep it off, wake up with a hangover, but a reasonably firm grasp on their identity, their psyche, and able to continue without the act crippling their life going forward.    You can see this in entertainment all the time.  Because morality stories are one of the most popular forms of storytelling in human history.    The only one that comes to mind in recent memory, is from the Avengers.  When Hawkeye finally shakes off Loki's control, and Black Widow is talking to him.  Mind control aspect aside, and the justification portion aside, I'm just talking about the actual way they talk to each other about the situation.  His immediate reaction, is to be very upset by what he might've done, and you can clearly see he's about to start spiraling into a self-destructive reaction, but Natasha cuts him off "Don't, do go down that road.  We both know it won't help."  He considers what she said, nods, and internalizes it and moves on.  He's not happy about it, but he's also not in the fetal position, crying about it.  It's effected him, he's trying to move forward about it, and try and keep doing good in the world, and work harder to not let something like that happen again.   That's an example of a positive result on a Morality roll.  Not rainbow and unicorns and sunshine pixies, but pain, sorrow, regret, remorse but also resolve and determination  
    An example of a loss in Morality result:
    Same situation, but instead of the friend helping them get over their conflict, the talk doesn't help, perhaps the person is too griefstricken, and turned inward, so instead, Joe PeeSee decides to cut himself on his arm, deep enough to leave a scar, to "always remind him of what he did."  Or when he wakes up from that drinking bender, instead of coming to terms with things with a clear head, he instead reaches for another bottle from the fridge, snarls at one of his shipmates, and stumbles back to his bunk.   Or, maybe he doesn't think anything was wrong with what he did, in retrospect.  And in fact, he feels totally vindicated and justified in his actions, maybe even a little invigorated.   He begins to be more short with his temper with people who behave in a way that reminds him of the thug, because "they're all the same."   So maybe he starts considering just attacking them right away, instead of his old, naive method of trying to resolve situations with negotiations first.  
    He starts to redirect his emotions about the event, into behavioral traits.  Loss of hygiene (like Anakin getting greasier), or obsessive hygiene.  Heightened emotions, with fits of outbursts (again, like Anakin), or an emotional shutdown and masking.   Perhaps he is still kind of conflicted about his actions, but his internal Palpatine on his shoulder reminds him of how he felt that first time, and he tries to embrace it again, or uses that to justify his actions again, now through the colored glass of his unstable viewpoint.  He starts to avoid friends, because perhaps they remind him of the way he used to think, and it upsets him, or he's angry with how naive they are, but he doesn't want to make them angry by voicing his new opinions on things, so he just removes himself from the conversation.   
    These traits begin to become more pronounced, assuming he keeps doing Conflicty behavior, and also failing his rolls, thus moving further down.  Eventually, he's just given into the new behaviors he has adopted due to his conflict, and that is his new normal.
    That's all for now, as I'm a little busy at work, and can't get a solid block of time to further elaborate on this.   I'll post my thoughts on how you would roleplay someone who has, for example, begun to decline, but then starts to work their way back up.  I think it's pretty self-explanatory, and again, you can simply use films/tv/books for great examples of this kind of shift in behavior, but I'll give some more detailed methods that I personally use.
     
    This is all just my thoughts of course, that I'm sharing, simply because of the common issues I see a lot of people express about this issue.  This isn't a "The Morality system sucks!" thread, and if are going to post something like that, please, kindly sod off.   There are a billion of those threads up at all times, feel free to post there.  This is a thread about trying to actually express the mechanics in a narrative way.  Something that, apparently a lot of people have problems with, because they never seem to be able to look past the numbers.  
    Anyway, that's all for now, hope some people find it helpful
  3. Like
    Kaigen reacted to Donovan Morningfire in Encumberance and burly   
    So with a Brawn of 5, that PC has a base Encumbrance Threshold of 10, and I'm assuming it's higher due to gear such as a utility belt or load-bearing gear.
    With the three ranks of Burly, so long as the total Encumbrance of those items is under his PC's Encumbrance Threshold, then yes by RAW the PC can carry all that gear without penalty.  Of course, any PC can lug that much stuff, but they're going to be encumbered, which has penalties that I don't recall as I've never seen a PC exceed their Encumbrance Threshold.
    So from a purely rules perspective, yes you were being overly harsh as you're denying the character something they're legally allowed to do just because you thought it was silly.  Granted, the player's also being a bit silly be wanting tote around that much firepower, so you're not totally out of bounds.
    That said, I see where you're coming from as it's not very realistic to have someone just be tugging around so much gear without a problem.  Apart from this system not being a reality-based tactical simulator, remember that this PC has invested in things that would allow him to lug around large items without much trouble, given it's very difficult to start with a Brawn of 5 (I'm assuming he started with a 4 and then took Dedication) and he's invested lots of XP into getting those Burly talents.  As a concession, I'd suggest requiring him to have something that permits lugging extra gear (like load-bearing gear) to justify being able to carry and be able to access that stuff in the midst of combat without difficulty.  In game terms, if he wants to be able to draw or stow that stuff as just a maneuver, he needs something that lets him effectively carry the stuff, otherwise it'll take two maneuvers to draw or stow those extra weapons.  The heavy repeating blaster is on a sling, so that's already taken care of.
    It's worth noting that the weapons the player wants their character to lug around are military-grade weapons, and as a Rebel (I'm assuming this given the forum you're posting in) he's by default a terrorist guilty of sedition and treason against the Empire, the current ruling government body.  Apart from active battlefields, there's really no way that PC should be able to just waltz around carrying that sort of firepower; it'd be akin to a someone walking down a city street with a 50-caliber machine gun, which isn't going to go over well with the local authorities at all.  So that's something to keep in mind for when this PC wants to engage in activities that aren't centered around combat on an open battlefield.
  4. Like
    Kaigen reacted to Jedi Ronin in How much training do you need...   
    Any convincing on Rey that's going to happen has already happened.  Both sides have just enough to point to to keep themselves going forever.  Everyone watching it has already made up their mind too. Maybe accept that the Rey conversation isn't going anywhere and moving it to another thread if you still want to have it.
     
    I ask for some hook to hang the character development on but not much.  Most characters who want to play Jedi or Force Sensitives work it into their backstory which is most of the work.  If they're creating characters out of F&D then the "party resource" of a Holocron or Mentor then that's plenty for me.
    I think the XP required to get good at force related stuff bakes in enough time to develop the abilities that they don't show up suddenly (if that's even a problem).
    And to actually reference the movies in a way that's on topic and addresses your question: do what the film makers do and is to your (GM and player) taste.  I think too much attention is paid to character development as in-setting canon and too little on what is in reality a director decision in character development.  There's not some grand scheme to explain Luke's training and Rey's training and Obi-wan's training other than they do things the story teller needs them to do when they need them to do it.  JJ Abrams used a more accelerated time scale than used before and some people have a problem with that, if you're one of them then build in more in the game to bring training in to the narrative (holocrons, mentors, etc).  If you want fairly quick character development but want more nods to training more then that's more a Luke story arc.  If you want in depth training then Obi-wan is your model.  Rebels seemed to have middle-road where Ezra developed over seasons but did get fairly competent quickly - but his training and failures were highlighted in several episodes (I'm thinking when re learned reflect and well as developing his animal affinity).  Know what story beats you (GM and player) like and go for that.  I think the basic F&D core book puts a lot of these elements in the game if you want to use them.
    In my play group one player didn't decide until months into the campaign that he wanted to branch his character out into being Force Sensitive and it's worked out really well.  He hasn't used any flashy force powers so that wasn't an issue but he's reached out to the Jedi in the group to get some actual training so any such changes in ability will have an explanation now.  Though if he had done things like suddenly used Move or Influence etc I think it could easily have been chalked up to doing something extraordinary and untrained subconsciously when threatened (the old trope of "young wizard used magic without knowing it" seems to work in star wars too to some degree).
  5. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from Donovan Morningfire in How much training do you need...   
    Aside from the narrative questions relating to the tone and story of the campaign, there are also practical considerations. If it's a face-to-face or real-time game you're playing, how much time do you want to devote to individual scenes roleplaying character training? Do you have a group of players who will stay interested and engaged while the Jedi roleplays trying really hard to move rocks and do flips, or will that lead to people getting bored and checking out?
    My experience has been that training (of any type) gets glossed over in face-to-face games because people want to keep the plot moving and would rather participate in group scenes. If there's a narrative need for someone to be training, it's more likely to be handwaved as a downtime activity than explored in detail. In the PbP games I've been in, on the other hand, it's easier to roleplay that sort of thing out without worrying about hogging the spotlight, and so players will spend more time on it in introductory or transitional posts.
  6. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from tunewalker in How much training do you need...   
    Aside from the narrative questions relating to the tone and story of the campaign, there are also practical considerations. If it's a face-to-face or real-time game you're playing, how much time do you want to devote to individual scenes roleplaying character training? Do you have a group of players who will stay interested and engaged while the Jedi roleplays trying really hard to move rocks and do flips, or will that lead to people getting bored and checking out?
    My experience has been that training (of any type) gets glossed over in face-to-face games because people want to keep the plot moving and would rather participate in group scenes. If there's a narrative need for someone to be training, it's more likely to be handwaved as a downtime activity than explored in detail. In the PbP games I've been in, on the other hand, it's easier to roleplay that sort of thing out without worrying about hogging the spotlight, and so players will spend more time on it in introductory or transitional posts.
  7. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from Daeglan in How much training do you need...   
    Aside from the narrative questions relating to the tone and story of the campaign, there are also practical considerations. If it's a face-to-face or real-time game you're playing, how much time do you want to devote to individual scenes roleplaying character training? Do you have a group of players who will stay interested and engaged while the Jedi roleplays trying really hard to move rocks and do flips, or will that lead to people getting bored and checking out?
    My experience has been that training (of any type) gets glossed over in face-to-face games because people want to keep the plot moving and would rather participate in group scenes. If there's a narrative need for someone to be training, it's more likely to be handwaved as a downtime activity than explored in detail. In the PbP games I've been in, on the other hand, it's easier to roleplay that sort of thing out without worrying about hogging the spotlight, and so players will spend more time on it in introductory or transitional posts.
  8. Like
    Kaigen reacted to KungFuFerret in some interesting insights into the Force, Jedi, and galactic history from a new interview with Lucas   
    You don't have to have a massive army, and have engaged in a battle between thousands of troops, to have a grudge against a group, and decide you want to wipe them out via terrorism and sabotage.   You need religious doctrine teaching you that "They" slighted you and your ways (even if that's only two of you), and the drive to do whatever it takes to punish them for said transgressions.  
    The Sith could easily just be a cult of Dark Side force users, that got a handful of followers, but given how much of a mess they were making in some section of the galaxy, the Jedi went to go stamp them out.  One or two survived, and vowed revenge.   I've seriously lost count of the number of stories that have used that very plot to show a small group of people, set up stuff to bring down a larger organization.   Heck, Civil War is exactly that.  ONE GUY, who was personally angry due to something Tony did, decided to set in motion a massive plan, that tore apart the Avengers, and set up government sanctions against Heroes.  He wasn't part of an army, he was just a guy, grief stricken, and murderously motivated to accomplish his goal.   

    The Sith grudge against the Jedi could be something just as small and simple.  
     
    OT:  I'm glad he finally said that the Jedi can love and feel emotions, so maybe the fan base will shut the **** up about the Jedi being Vulcans, and how they purge themselves of all emotions, and anyone that doesn't play them like this is "Doing It Wrong", despite NO evidence of any canon Jedi acting without the existence of emotions in their lives.
  9. Like
    Kaigen reacted to Fl1nt in some interesting insights into the Force, Jedi, and galactic history from a new interview with Lucas   
    Author's talking about the stuff they wrote and the universe they (and successors) created in retrospective is always weird. (Just mentioning J.K. Rowling or somesuch).....
    At this point he either does not care at all (that's what I think) or is trying to retcon things to suit some narrative..
     
    Regarding to "there was no war between sith and jedi" both Legends and even new Disney Canon have mentioned atleast 1 war with Malachor V .... and as already stated, even his own works implied larger conflicts on a galactic scale.
  10. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from AnomalousAuthor in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    I'm not sure if I would dismiss the escalating cost of adding new specs as a "pretty cheap" option to get a lot of ranks in particular talents. The cost of just getting "a few other specs" is upwards of 100 XP just to be able to spend further XP on the talents you want, which is not trivial, especially if you're earning it 20 XP per session. In my experience, players go for a second spec fairly early, but it takes a while for them to go for a third, because dumping 30-40 XP for no immediate benefit is a hard sell when you could be getting closer to that Dedication/Force Rating/capstone talent.
    I also don't get the obsession with the characteristic-switch style talents, but that might be because no non-Force using archetype gets to have their cake and eat it too in that fashion. The Spy's Infiltrator spec doesn't get a talent to switch Melee to Agility just so they can put their stabby on the same characteristic as their sneaky. Commanders and Diplomats don't get to shoot people with Presence, nor do Engineers get to snipe you with Intellect. About the only archetype that does get it all in one place is pilots, but if you ask me that's just compensation for how often the pilot skillset gets sidelined for the majority of an adventure in a mixed group. Why should Jedi get an easy ticket out of multi-attribute dependency?
    As for what you're asking for with Force power, low-XP characters can already do all that. Basic Move can telekinesis a toolbox across a room and that's 10 XP (5 with the Mentor discount). Basic Harm does Intellect level damage ignoring soak, which, taking into account that most beings you'll fight have at least two soak, is at least worth 5 damage (or you can get the same effect from Move again for a maximum of 25 XP by tossing a 0 silhouette object). You can dump a lot of XP on upgrading a Force power, sure, but you don't need to if all you're trying to do is get the basic feel of being a Force user.
  11. Like
    Kaigen reacted to Donovan Morningfire in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    To TyrisFlare's disgruntlement...
    One thing that I think that needs to be clarified is at what point is a particular concept considered to be "fully realized."  Myself, I don't see most concepts being "fully realized" until the character has earned 150XP (aka are at Knight/Heroic Level), as that's enough XP to have at least two ranks in at least three or four the key skills the concept relies upon and at least a half-dozen talents from their starting spec.  Force users might take a bit more due to needing Force powers, but as others have shown, it's possible to build TPM!Kenobi using the rules for Knight Level, and it might even be even easier to do so now thanks to the existence of the Jedi career and Padawan spec.
    On this similar vein, and the reason I made the comparison to ErikB's demented rantings, is that part of TF's view is skewed by what we see the heroes of the films and media accomplish.  I'd posit that even Ahsoka Tano at the start of The Clone Wars when she shows up as Anakin's shiny new apprentice is probably around Knight Level in terms of her XP, having her starting 100XP from her species and the 150XP from being Knight Level, while Anakin and most certainly Obi-Wan have much more XP.
    I've built a fair number of Knight Level PCs that were in the theme of "novice Jedi students" and found that the 150XP (and assumption of having Mentor as their starting group resource) goes a long way towards making a solid character that is reasonably competent in most of the points that such a concept would need, those being at least two ranks in Lightsaber, the basic powers for Enhance and Move, the base power and defensive control upgrade for Sense, at lease one rank each in Athletics, Discipline, and Knowledge (Lore), and at least one rank in Parry and Reflect (assuming the spec used offers both of them), resulting in a fairly well-realized concept of a skilled Jedi apprentice.
    Which brings me to another thing that I feel Tyris of overlooking, namely that the various Form Technique talents are "required" for any Jedi PC that doesn't want to have Brawn 3.  One, Brawn 3 doesn't mean the character is a hulking mass of muscle; Bruce Lee was incredibly strong and resilient in contrast to his rather slim frame, so it's quite likely that a number of Jedi that we see in the films and other media have an above-average Brawn score.  But, even with Brawn of just 2, that doesn't mean the would-be Jedi is going to suck at using a lightsaber in combat.  Enough folks with a mind for that sort of thing have done statistical breakdowns of the math behind the dice, and generally speaking you're better off rolling more green dice than yellow dice in terms of succeeding with advantage on your combat checks.  And it's very easy for a starting Jedi/Padawan with no XP beyond what their species provides to start with two ranks in Lightsaber, and with a Brawn of 2 they'd be rolling 2 yellows, which is still pretty respectable against most opposition that you're likely to engage in your first adventure.  And unless the GM is super-stingy with XP awards, that first adventure should award you enough XP to buy a third rank in Lightsaber, giving you a solid dice pool of 2Y1G, which again is going to see you through most fights without much issue, and fits for a "general practitioner" mold that the Jedi career's specs (thus far) fall into.  If you really want your PC to focus and specialize in a given Form, then pay the XP to purchase that particular specialization, not only to get the corresponding Form Technique talent but also to learn the various specialized tricks that the Form offers.  And this is aside from the fact that having an above-average Brawn helps a Jedi character out by providing more soak at the onset and an additional point to their wound threshold, both of which are handy to have in the early going.
    Now, onto the (frankly unfair) comparison of the Force mechanics to how Genesys handles magic-users.  It's akin to comparing eating an apple with eating a slice of watermelon; yes they're both fruits, but they're also very different types of fruits.  From the earliest days of EotE, it's been stated by the designers that their intent was to mimic Luke's progression in learning about the Force, with him not displaying many of what is assumed to be standard Jedi abilities until near the end of his hero's journey in RotJ.  Heck, he struggled with the basic Move power in ESB, an ability that most Jedi-type PCs in this system would have mastered at the very start of their careers.  Now, this was before TFA came out and it was demonstrated that actual training was less important than the belief that a Force user could do a thing ("I don't believe it!" "That is why you fail."), and it remains to be seen if FFG will revisit how Force powers are learned/developed either in a future supplement or in a possible revised/second edition.
    With Genesys however, the magic system was largely meant to be much more free-form and that the PCs did all the necessary study/learning before the campaign started, not unlike how in D&D and related systems a wizard (or cleric or druid or warlock or bard) has already learned the fundamentals necessary to their class by 1st level.  So again, a very different approach than Star Wars' "learn as you go."
    Plus, I suspect part of why FFG made it more expensive to become a capable Force user was that each of the prior RPGs, from WEG's d6 up through WotC's Saga Edition, suffered from the Force user PCs stealing the show once they reached a certain degree of competency at Force usage, with Saga Edition probably being the worst offender due to how the skill system interacted with NPC defense scores, especially at the lower end of the spectrum.
    As I said, it's entirely possible that FFG may revisit how the Force works in their game.  I've been playing around with a hybrid of the existing Force powers and the Genesys skill-based system with elements of WEG's approach (namely having three Force skills).  So far, the early drafts have some promise, but there's a lot of fine-tuning needed before I even think of moving to full playtesting.  But I assure anyone still reading at this point that a Force user won't be easily accomplishing major feats of Force usage right away, and while it might be cost-saving in terms of XP compared to buying into multiple Force power trees, it's not going to be totally inexpensive to become a master of the Force either.
  12. Like
    Kaigen reacted to HappyDaze in How to run interesting social encounter?   
    Sounds more like a social version of the Mass Combat rules to me. Just decide the stages, victory conditions, and participants (your voting block & lobbyists vs the opposition). Then have scenes the PCs can participate in to give modifiers to the big rolls depending on how well they handle the scenes.
  13. Like
    Kaigen reacted to HappyDaze in Species That Need Love   
    Oddly enough, Star Trek had the Deltans, an empathic species with pheromones and a whole culture of expression through sex, yet that species also routinely took on vows of celibacy when interacting with other species of the Federation in order to avoid the spank factor.
  14. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from Donovan Morningfire in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    Or, you know, you could just buy ranks of the Lightsaber skill to make up for an average Brawn.
  15. Like
    Kaigen reacted to Rogues Rule in Attachments to extend the range on a carbine   
    A few ideas that come to my mind:
    A) You could use the DDC-MR6 Modular Rifle (Special Modifications). It comes with a base range of only medium and is made to exchange attachments on the fly and has a lot of hard points. Just narrate it as a carbine/ carbine-like weapon.
    B) Modify your armor with a range finder (Dangerous Covenants) to get a rank of the sniper shot talent.
    C) Adapt the crafting rules a little bit to craft your own long range carbine.
  16. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from HappyDaze in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    Or, you know, you could just buy ranks of the Lightsaber skill to make up for an average Brawn.
  17. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from KRKappel in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    Or, you know, you could just buy ranks of the Lightsaber skill to make up for an average Brawn.
  18. Like
    Kaigen reacted to KungFuFerret in Order Sixty-Six & Jedi slack response   
    Yes that part felt very much like another plot thread that just got left on the cutting room floor, like the whole "diminished force use" thingy.   Realistically, anyone with half a brain would investigate that further, especially with the current events in the Republic at the time.  Heck just look at the real world, and how people will theorize the motivations for world leaders doing things.  If a country found that an ARMY of mind controlled clones in the tens of thousands was being grown on Earth, you bet your butts that there would be WAY more research and investigation into that, than what we see in the films.  But, again, with prequels, you have to have a certain end point, so Lucas just let the Jedi be stupid about this issue, so that it wouldn't have them discover the puppet master too soon, and derail the "sudden but inevitable betrayal" of Palps.
  19. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from Stan Fresh in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    Or, you know, you could just buy ranks of the Lightsaber skill to make up for an average Brawn.
  20. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from AnomalousAuthor in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    Or, you know, you could just buy ranks of the Lightsaber skill to make up for an average Brawn.
  21. Like
    Kaigen reacted to Ghostofman in After Padawan and Knight in Rise of the Separatists, what other Jedi specs could we get?   
    Agreed. 
     
    Until you run the math.
    Form=Tree cost+10 for Out of Career, +15 for Talents.
    Outcast costs = Tree cost + 45 for Talents.
    Getting the Renegade Form talent costs 20XP more than just going for an actual form.
  22. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from Archlyte in Aim description for Melee   
    It could also be described as taking a moment to plan out a quick series of moves and try to anticipate your opponent's response. The boost die then tells you how closely reality matches what you played out in your head.
  23. Like
    Kaigen reacted to SavageBob in How to run interesting social encounter?   
    I would keep most social checks to a single roll in situations where things are not plot-critical. For instance, Charming a random bartender to tell you where the crime lord's palace is, buying stimpacks, or using Deception on a stormtrooper who asks you if you have your papers.
    For important social encounters, you might want to look at Genesys, the generic ruleset that was developed from the Star Wars rules. That book has rules for "structured" social encounters where the PCs and NPCs get to take cracks at each other. In a nutshell, you don't go in initiative order but instead take turns speaking and influencing one another based on what makes narrative sense. Each time you try a social check against the other side, you inflict Strain Damage based on uncanceled successes. If you fail your check, though, you suffer 2 strain. They do the same to you, rolling a social check on your or one of the other PCs and causing strain on you.
    At half Strain Threshold, your adversary is willing to compromise. If you want them to acquiesce completely, though, you have to get them to below Strain Threshold. You will, of course, want to include multiple opponents in the room with the adversary, giving the PCs more targets to convince, or giving the main big bad advisors or companions to give them boosts to resist your PCs' charms.
    You get boosts and setbacks to your checks based on whether your approach appeals to or contradicts the target's motivations. Motivations are more complex in Genesys, but you could adapt the idea to Star Wars, or just consider each character's immediate goals for the encounter and their long-term goals. You can spend 2 advantage (or 3? away from books) on a social roll to uncover one of your rivals' motivations, and they can do the same to you.
    It's pretty fun. I ran a social encounter like this in a play-by-post game. Came down the wire, but the PCs prevailed in convincing a rival to ally with them temporarily.
  24. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from Rimsen in Aim description for Melee   
    It could also be described as taking a moment to plan out a quick series of moves and try to anticipate your opponent's response. The boost die then tells you how closely reality matches what you played out in your head.
  25. Like
    Kaigen got a reaction from AnomalousAuthor in Aim description for Melee   
    It could also be described as taking a moment to plan out a quick series of moves and try to anticipate your opponent's response. The boost die then tells you how closely reality matches what you played out in your head.
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