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jmoschner

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  1. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from RLogue177 in Duros Spaceships?   
    Maybe all ships are actually of Duros design, with the major companies hiring Duros designers, but moving manufacturing to areas closer to raw materials, cheap labor, or the market where they are to be sold.
     
    Maybe Duros are like Bugatti (the real world car company), they don't make a lot of cars, just a few really expensive high end cars that are just amazing, but that you will probably never drive and may never even see.
  2. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from Daeglan in Did I miss something?   
    Books take time. Good adventures and stories take time to refine. The more crunch, the longer it takes to balance new crunch and look for bugs or things that are broken (especially if you have lots of books or don't have a design doc for the mechanics).
     
    Having done stuff for a number of other companies, it usually goes something like:
    Idea for book Hire writer(s) Writer creates an Outline/treatment Send off Outline/treatment for approval (For something based on some else's IP you may or may not need approval at various stages before and/or after this. If so that takes more time.) Outine is approved Writer starts writing Comission Art and graphics (this can take a while, have seen books delayed for months waiting on delivery of art) Playtest chapters as they are written Compile feedback Write revisions Playtest revisions Repeat revisions and playtesting as needed or until you hit the deadline Move out of playtest. Getting here can take months, even years. Splat books and adventures usually take less time. The crunchier the system the longer it takes (and this system is not creamy) Edit the book (clarify language and fix speeling and gramar errors, remove or add sections, reorder chapters, etc) Have final locked manuscript Assemble Art and graphical elements, creating new elements as needed Edit Art and graphics (resize, crop, adjust color tint shading, convert files, etc.) Layout the book (this can take upto a week or more depending on size and complexity of the book, those doing layout, quality of the art, etc) Edit the book again. Lots of little bookkeeping tasks like making sure page numbers match or index is correct. In-house approval of layout and edit (or make changes until approved) Send off for any outside approvals Wait for approvals Make changes and repeat process if applicable. Send off approved files to printer for a proof Wait for the printer to print the proof Wait for proof to arrive from Asia (odds are they are printing in Asia [probably China], hence the phrase "On the boat") Ok proof or make changes based on the proof (like an image is too dark or text is hard to read on one page) and repeat if needed. Book goes to print (this can take a good while depending on who your printer is and where your book falls in line) Book ships (and hopefully isn't held up in customs or by a dock strike) Book goes to distributor then enters the retail chain. It will also depend on how easy it is to work with the licensing people. Lucas licensing may respond quickly and not care what FFG does short of having Luke and Chewy make out, or they might be slow to respond and nit pick over every detail in the books.
     
    So all in all there is a lot that needs to be done to get a book out and it takes time to do so, escpecially to do it right.
  3. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from Ghostofman in Parry, Reflect, Strain and Rival NPCs   
    You would track their strain. The book says "GMs can decide to track strain on certain rivals, even though this is not the norm. This does create extra bookkeeping for the GM, but it also allows some additional granularity for rivals who might prove important to teh plot. In essence, this allows the gm to create nemesis class characters with weaker than average stats."
  4. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from Ghostofman in Did I miss something?   
    Books take time. Good adventures and stories take time to refine. The more crunch, the longer it takes to balance new crunch and look for bugs or things that are broken (especially if you have lots of books or don't have a design doc for the mechanics).
     
    Having done stuff for a number of other companies, it usually goes something like:
    Idea for book Hire writer(s) Writer creates an Outline/treatment Send off Outline/treatment for approval (For something based on some else's IP you may or may not need approval at various stages before and/or after this. If so that takes more time.) Outine is approved Writer starts writing Comission Art and graphics (this can take a while, have seen books delayed for months waiting on delivery of art) Playtest chapters as they are written Compile feedback Write revisions Playtest revisions Repeat revisions and playtesting as needed or until you hit the deadline Move out of playtest. Getting here can take months, even years. Splat books and adventures usually take less time. The crunchier the system the longer it takes (and this system is not creamy) Edit the book (clarify language and fix speeling and gramar errors, remove or add sections, reorder chapters, etc) Have final locked manuscript Assemble Art and graphical elements, creating new elements as needed Edit Art and graphics (resize, crop, adjust color tint shading, convert files, etc.) Layout the book (this can take upto a week or more depending on size and complexity of the book, those doing layout, quality of the art, etc) Edit the book again. Lots of little bookkeeping tasks like making sure page numbers match or index is correct. In-house approval of layout and edit (or make changes until approved) Send off for any outside approvals Wait for approvals Make changes and repeat process if applicable. Send off approved files to printer for a proof Wait for the printer to print the proof Wait for proof to arrive from Asia (odds are they are printing in Asia [probably China], hence the phrase "On the boat") Ok proof or make changes based on the proof (like an image is too dark or text is hard to read on one page) and repeat if needed. Book goes to print (this can take a good while depending on who your printer is and where your book falls in line) Book ships (and hopefully isn't held up in customs or by a dock strike) Book goes to distributor then enters the retail chain. It will also depend on how easy it is to work with the licensing people. Lucas licensing may respond quickly and not care what FFG does short of having Luke and Chewy make out, or they might be slow to respond and nit pick over every detail in the books.
     
    So all in all there is a lot that needs to be done to get a book out and it takes time to do so, escpecially to do it right.
  5. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from Tear44 in Did I miss something?   
    Books take time. Good adventures and stories take time to refine. The more crunch, the longer it takes to balance new crunch and look for bugs or things that are broken (especially if you have lots of books or don't have a design doc for the mechanics).
     
    Having done stuff for a number of other companies, it usually goes something like:
    Idea for book Hire writer(s) Writer creates an Outline/treatment Send off Outline/treatment for approval (For something based on some else's IP you may or may not need approval at various stages before and/or after this. If so that takes more time.) Outine is approved Writer starts writing Comission Art and graphics (this can take a while, have seen books delayed for months waiting on delivery of art) Playtest chapters as they are written Compile feedback Write revisions Playtest revisions Repeat revisions and playtesting as needed or until you hit the deadline Move out of playtest. Getting here can take months, even years. Splat books and adventures usually take less time. The crunchier the system the longer it takes (and this system is not creamy) Edit the book (clarify language and fix speeling and gramar errors, remove or add sections, reorder chapters, etc) Have final locked manuscript Assemble Art and graphical elements, creating new elements as needed Edit Art and graphics (resize, crop, adjust color tint shading, convert files, etc.) Layout the book (this can take upto a week or more depending on size and complexity of the book, those doing layout, quality of the art, etc) Edit the book again. Lots of little bookkeeping tasks like making sure page numbers match or index is correct. In-house approval of layout and edit (or make changes until approved) Send off for any outside approvals Wait for approvals Make changes and repeat process if applicable. Send off approved files to printer for a proof Wait for the printer to print the proof Wait for proof to arrive from Asia (odds are they are printing in Asia [probably China], hence the phrase "On the boat") Ok proof or make changes based on the proof (like an image is too dark or text is hard to read on one page) and repeat if needed. Book goes to print (this can take a good while depending on who your printer is and where your book falls in line) Book ships (and hopefully isn't held up in customs or by a dock strike) Book goes to distributor then enters the retail chain. It will also depend on how easy it is to work with the licensing people. Lucas licensing may respond quickly and not care what FFG does short of having Luke and Chewy make out, or they might be slow to respond and nit pick over every detail in the books.
     
    So all in all there is a lot that needs to be done to get a book out and it takes time to do so, escpecially to do it right.
  6. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from Grayfax in Campaigns, Building, Ships, and Bases   
    I wouldn't base it on the size of the ships, but rather the costs. Look at a few of the ships/vehicles they would want to build and determine how long you think it should take to build one, divide the cost of ship by the number of days (or months) it takes to build, and that gives you your baseline.
     
    Then just divide the cost of any ship by that number to know how long it would take.
     
    Going by cost vs size is more balanced as a ship decked out with weapons and the best engines might be the same size a simple cargo ship, but would cost more and take longer to build than the cargoship.
  7. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from kaosoe in Did I miss something?   
    Books take time. Good adventures and stories take time to refine. The more crunch, the longer it takes to balance new crunch and look for bugs or things that are broken (especially if you have lots of books or don't have a design doc for the mechanics).
     
    Having done stuff for a number of other companies, it usually goes something like:
    Idea for book Hire writer(s) Writer creates an Outline/treatment Send off Outline/treatment for approval (For something based on some else's IP you may or may not need approval at various stages before and/or after this. If so that takes more time.) Outine is approved Writer starts writing Comission Art and graphics (this can take a while, have seen books delayed for months waiting on delivery of art) Playtest chapters as they are written Compile feedback Write revisions Playtest revisions Repeat revisions and playtesting as needed or until you hit the deadline Move out of playtest. Getting here can take months, even years. Splat books and adventures usually take less time. The crunchier the system the longer it takes (and this system is not creamy) Edit the book (clarify language and fix speeling and gramar errors, remove or add sections, reorder chapters, etc) Have final locked manuscript Assemble Art and graphical elements, creating new elements as needed Edit Art and graphics (resize, crop, adjust color tint shading, convert files, etc.) Layout the book (this can take upto a week or more depending on size and complexity of the book, those doing layout, quality of the art, etc) Edit the book again. Lots of little bookkeeping tasks like making sure page numbers match or index is correct. In-house approval of layout and edit (or make changes until approved) Send off for any outside approvals Wait for approvals Make changes and repeat process if applicable. Send off approved files to printer for a proof Wait for the printer to print the proof Wait for proof to arrive from Asia (odds are they are printing in Asia [probably China], hence the phrase "On the boat") Ok proof or make changes based on the proof (like an image is too dark or text is hard to read on one page) and repeat if needed. Book goes to print (this can take a good while depending on who your printer is and where your book falls in line) Book ships (and hopefully isn't held up in customs or by a dock strike) Book goes to distributor then enters the retail chain. It will also depend on how easy it is to work with the licensing people. Lucas licensing may respond quickly and not care what FFG does short of having Luke and Chewy make out, or they might be slow to respond and nit pick over every detail in the books.
     
    So all in all there is a lot that needs to be done to get a book out and it takes time to do so, escpecially to do it right.
  8. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from Jegergryte in Parry, Reflect, Strain and Rival NPCs   
    You would track their strain. The book says "GMs can decide to track strain on certain rivals, even though this is not the norm. This does create extra bookkeeping for the GM, but it also allows some additional granularity for rivals who might prove important to teh plot. In essence, this allows the gm to create nemesis class characters with weaker than average stats."
  9. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from Col. Orange in Parry, Reflect, Strain and Rival NPCs   
    You would track their strain. The book says "GMs can decide to track strain on certain rivals, even though this is not the norm. This does create extra bookkeeping for the GM, but it also allows some additional granularity for rivals who might prove important to teh plot. In essence, this allows the gm to create nemesis class characters with weaker than average stats."
  10. Like
    jmoschner reacted to LethalDose in Should GMs let players Create and Play their own Species?   
    This is an interesting (and good) point that I hadn't considered: custom or obscure species could be detrimental to the other players' immersion.
  11. Like
    jmoschner reacted to Moon of Dalo in Should GMs let players Create and Play their own Species?   
    I wouldn't let them.
    Plenty of "official" races in the game already no reason to fret and whine and weedle and compromise and yell and plead and so on just for someone to get to play something everyone else at the table has no ideas of who/what it is supposed to be.
  12. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from kaosoe in New article about the upcoming canned game (and it's use with EotE and AoR)   
    It is just them making sure to highlight all the main books. Basic sells.
     
    When the article says the adventure "was also designed to be completely playable by roleplaying groups involved in Edge of the Empire and Age of Rebellion campaigns" that probably just means that you don't a particular force power or FaD talent to succeed in the adventure (and if it is wirtten well that should be case anyway, I'd hate to fail a campaign because no one in the group took battle meditation).
     
    All three books share core mechanics so it isn't like they have to change stats or anything drastic. It is fairly easy to write in some hooks for non-force characters: the lure of profit, a potential weapon/resource for the rebellion, helping an old friend, owing someone a debt, wrong palce wrong time, jedi spirit is haunting you, your ship breaks down and you stumble into the plot, etc.
  13. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from bradknowles in Issues in Combat   
    Have you tried using a large number of weaker foes? Let them one shot one bad guy each a round as the group faces a dozen or more foes. More enemies can focus on the big guys while the less combat oriented pcs can face just 1 enemy each.
     
    You could just not record all the damage they do. They don't have to know how many wounds a foe has. 
     
    Separate them from the others sometimes. Have a ship crash and smoke and debris splitting up the group.
     
    Don't make the real bad guys look like the big bads. Have them seem like middlemen or obscure their appearance or use holograms to taunt them. Have the scared merchant hostage really be the ring leader who ganks the OP PCs while their guard is down.
     
    You could also try talking to them about keeping the characters in check. 
  14. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from LordBritish in Morality Problems   
    The core of the problem is that without GM intervention, the mechanics of the system are skewed to gaining morality even when doing bad things. That just doesn't seem like a good mechanic. It also appears this happens because of the way force pips are generated. It appears that the system assumes the players will have to use a few dark side pips every session and tries to compensate for that with the way conflict is turned into morality. The way the system handles this is clunky, abusable, and not fitting thematically with the setting.
     
    I get the power level the game is to played at. That is part of the appeal. However the mechanics for force powers don't fit well with the core mechanics.
     
    Right now using force powers is a separate mechanic* that is dependent on the roll of the force dice not the character's skill. That in my group's opinion is not good design and does not fit thematically with the setting. Having powers that are reliant on a randomly generated pool of force points that may or may not be evil in origin just doesn't sit right.
    (*well it really is more than one mechanic as sometimes you roll and sometimes you commit a die)
     
    We are almost done rewriting the entire set of mechanics for morality and force powers. The goal is to take the overly engineered mechanics in the book and streamline them into something more fitting and hopefully more enjoyable.
     
    We start by mostly removing force dice from the equation. We will use the Discipline skill to use force powers that currently require rolling a force die. The Characteristic used will vary based on the power being used. For example Willpower for Move and Enhance, or Cunning for Sense and Influence. Using the a basic power starts as a hard task, then upgrading the power would add more difficulty dice to the roll. A power cannot be upgraded past formidable. So at most a basic power by a force rank 1 user could do is 2 upgrades (but they would likely fail). Using a force power inflicts 1 strain plus 1 per upgrade plus any strain described by the power.
     
    When a character goes up in force rating, they reduce the difficulty of force rolls by (Force rank -1). So a rank 2 could use a basic power as an average task or add up to three upgrades making it a formidable task.
     
    By using a real dice pool it not only falls in line more with the core mechanics, but we get to do things like add boost and setback dice and create situations where there are good and bad side effects when using powers.
     
    Now we get to tapping into the darkside. Characters can spend morality to dip into the darkside and reduce the difficulty of a force roll . Every 2 points of Morality spent removes one difficulty die from the roll (to a minimum of one) and also removes/negates 1 advantage (if applicable).
     
    The above makes using the force based on skill while keeping what characters can achieve down to a lower power level. It also makes using the darkside feel more like a deliberate choice and a seductive one at that. Removing an advantage makes conditions more important and ups the risk of using the power. Sure you can move the datapad down the long dark hall, but you now risk setting off the alarm or cracking the screen. It would also make using the darkside more tempting as it would make things easier starting out. This also helps us remove the conflict currency from the system.
     
    Talents, Powers and Upgrades.
    For powers and talents that require a force die be committed, they now require 2 strain be committed instead. This strain cannot be recovered until it is no longer committed to the power/talent/effect.
     
    For right now we are going with you must have purchased an upgrade to try and up the difficulty to use it. Basically if it says to spend a force pip, you up the difficulty.
     
    Control and mastery are being handled per power, but typically if it says to spend a force pip we are just requiring spending 1 strain.
     
    This isn't a perfect fix, but it is working more or less for now. We will eventually rewrite and reprice the powers if we keep playing.
     
    Now onto Morality.
     
    The big changes are that we are removing the conflict currency and the random factors that go into morality. We are making it about character and character choices more than how the dice roll. We start by nixing the increase/decrease mortality at character creation option. Instead we are going with players and the GM talking it over and deciding where their morality falls.
     
    We are replacing the random roll to see which PC gets triggered and instead instituting that when faced with a moral choice and the player isn't sure what to do, they can roll a percentile. If the result is less than or equal to their morality, then they are inclined to do the right thing/play to their strength. If they roll above their morality they are inclined to do the wrong thing/play to their weakness. This is mostly a tool to help guide decisions, not to force them.
     
    Introducing a way to regain morality where when faced with a conflict and the character does the right thing they gain morality. This is a work in progress. The idea is that morality gain can only come from big story moments or as a reward for multiple games of doing good.
     
    The Common Conflict Penalties have been turned into direct morality point loss. Continue with the general rule that morality is adjusted at the end of session, unless it is dramatically appropriate for it change mid session.
     
    Once a character is down to 1 morality, they cannot spend it. They are consumed by the darkside, but there is still that 1 point of humanity left in there.
     
    Characters at or below the darkside threshold can no longer directly benefit from light side destiny pips. They can however benefit from those spent on the group as a whole. They can directly benefit from darkside pips and can spend them to benefit the group as a whole, but must have a good motivation for doing so. The GM may use light side pips against darkside characters directly and still use darkside pips against neutral or light side characters and the group as a whole. Light side pips cannot be used against neutral or light side characters.
     
    Once a character has fallen to the darkside, the road back is hard. When trying to do the right thing, they must roll a percentile against their morality. If the result is less than or equal to their morality, they can act of their accord. If the result is higher than their morality, they must flip a darkside destiny pip (i.e make it light side) to act of their own accord. Otherwise they cannot overcome the darkness.
     
    The light and dark side threshold benefits are changed as follows:
     
    100 - reduce strain by 3 (to a minimum of 1) when using a force power*
    90+ - reduce strain by 2 (to a minimum of 1) when using a force power*
    80+ - reduce strain by 1 (to a minimum of 1) when using a force power*
    *Does not apply if you spend morality on the power.
    21+ – no benefit
     
    <=20 - Reduce difficulty by 1 (to a minimum of 1) and remove 1 advantage (if applicable) when using a force power**
    <= 10 - Reduce difficulty by 2 (to a minimum of 1) and remove 2 advantage (if applicable) when using a force power**
    1 - Reduce difficulty by 3 (to a minimum of 1) and remove 3 advantage (if applicable) when using a force power**
    **Does NOT stack with effects of spending morality
     
    Hopefully the above changes will lead to a better play experience for our group. If they also help anyone else who isn't loving the current set up, great. If people love the way things are in the books that's awesome.
  15. Like
    jmoschner got a reaction from whafrog in Morality Problems   
    The core of the problem is that without GM intervention, the mechanics of the system are skewed to gaining morality even when doing bad things. That just doesn't seem like a good mechanic. It also appears this happens because of the way force pips are generated. It appears that the system assumes the players will have to use a few dark side pips every session and tries to compensate for that with the way conflict is turned into morality. The way the system handles this is clunky, abusable, and not fitting thematically with the setting.
     
    I get the power level the game is to played at. That is part of the appeal. However the mechanics for force powers don't fit well with the core mechanics.
     
    Right now using force powers is a separate mechanic* that is dependent on the roll of the force dice not the character's skill. That in my group's opinion is not good design and does not fit thematically with the setting. Having powers that are reliant on a randomly generated pool of force points that may or may not be evil in origin just doesn't sit right.
    (*well it really is more than one mechanic as sometimes you roll and sometimes you commit a die)
     
    We are almost done rewriting the entire set of mechanics for morality and force powers. The goal is to take the overly engineered mechanics in the book and streamline them into something more fitting and hopefully more enjoyable.
     
    We start by mostly removing force dice from the equation. We will use the Discipline skill to use force powers that currently require rolling a force die. The Characteristic used will vary based on the power being used. For example Willpower for Move and Enhance, or Cunning for Sense and Influence. Using the a basic power starts as a hard task, then upgrading the power would add more difficulty dice to the roll. A power cannot be upgraded past formidable. So at most a basic power by a force rank 1 user could do is 2 upgrades (but they would likely fail). Using a force power inflicts 1 strain plus 1 per upgrade plus any strain described by the power.
     
    When a character goes up in force rating, they reduce the difficulty of force rolls by (Force rank -1). So a rank 2 could use a basic power as an average task or add up to three upgrades making it a formidable task.
     
    By using a real dice pool it not only falls in line more with the core mechanics, but we get to do things like add boost and setback dice and create situations where there are good and bad side effects when using powers.
     
    Now we get to tapping into the darkside. Characters can spend morality to dip into the darkside and reduce the difficulty of a force roll . Every 2 points of Morality spent removes one difficulty die from the roll (to a minimum of one) and also removes/negates 1 advantage (if applicable).
     
    The above makes using the force based on skill while keeping what characters can achieve down to a lower power level. It also makes using the darkside feel more like a deliberate choice and a seductive one at that. Removing an advantage makes conditions more important and ups the risk of using the power. Sure you can move the datapad down the long dark hall, but you now risk setting off the alarm or cracking the screen. It would also make using the darkside more tempting as it would make things easier starting out. This also helps us remove the conflict currency from the system.
     
    Talents, Powers and Upgrades.
    For powers and talents that require a force die be committed, they now require 2 strain be committed instead. This strain cannot be recovered until it is no longer committed to the power/talent/effect.
     
    For right now we are going with you must have purchased an upgrade to try and up the difficulty to use it. Basically if it says to spend a force pip, you up the difficulty.
     
    Control and mastery are being handled per power, but typically if it says to spend a force pip we are just requiring spending 1 strain.
     
    This isn't a perfect fix, but it is working more or less for now. We will eventually rewrite and reprice the powers if we keep playing.
     
    Now onto Morality.
     
    The big changes are that we are removing the conflict currency and the random factors that go into morality. We are making it about character and character choices more than how the dice roll. We start by nixing the increase/decrease mortality at character creation option. Instead we are going with players and the GM talking it over and deciding where their morality falls.
     
    We are replacing the random roll to see which PC gets triggered and instead instituting that when faced with a moral choice and the player isn't sure what to do, they can roll a percentile. If the result is less than or equal to their morality, then they are inclined to do the right thing/play to their strength. If they roll above their morality they are inclined to do the wrong thing/play to their weakness. This is mostly a tool to help guide decisions, not to force them.
     
    Introducing a way to regain morality where when faced with a conflict and the character does the right thing they gain morality. This is a work in progress. The idea is that morality gain can only come from big story moments or as a reward for multiple games of doing good.
     
    The Common Conflict Penalties have been turned into direct morality point loss. Continue with the general rule that morality is adjusted at the end of session, unless it is dramatically appropriate for it change mid session.
     
    Once a character is down to 1 morality, they cannot spend it. They are consumed by the darkside, but there is still that 1 point of humanity left in there.
     
    Characters at or below the darkside threshold can no longer directly benefit from light side destiny pips. They can however benefit from those spent on the group as a whole. They can directly benefit from darkside pips and can spend them to benefit the group as a whole, but must have a good motivation for doing so. The GM may use light side pips against darkside characters directly and still use darkside pips against neutral or light side characters and the group as a whole. Light side pips cannot be used against neutral or light side characters.
     
    Once a character has fallen to the darkside, the road back is hard. When trying to do the right thing, they must roll a percentile against their morality. If the result is less than or equal to their morality, they can act of their accord. If the result is higher than their morality, they must flip a darkside destiny pip (i.e make it light side) to act of their own accord. Otherwise they cannot overcome the darkness.
     
    The light and dark side threshold benefits are changed as follows:
     
    100 - reduce strain by 3 (to a minimum of 1) when using a force power*
    90+ - reduce strain by 2 (to a minimum of 1) when using a force power*
    80+ - reduce strain by 1 (to a minimum of 1) when using a force power*
    *Does not apply if you spend morality on the power.
    21+ – no benefit
     
    <=20 - Reduce difficulty by 1 (to a minimum of 1) and remove 1 advantage (if applicable) when using a force power**
    <= 10 - Reduce difficulty by 2 (to a minimum of 1) and remove 2 advantage (if applicable) when using a force power**
    1 - Reduce difficulty by 3 (to a minimum of 1) and remove 3 advantage (if applicable) when using a force power**
    **Does NOT stack with effects of spending morality
     
    Hopefully the above changes will lead to a better play experience for our group. If they also help anyone else who isn't loving the current set up, great. If people love the way things are in the books that's awesome.
  16. Like
    jmoschner reacted to FatPob in Finding an Ancient Sith Lord Skull... What powers could it have?   
    I would have the skull do exactly nothing. However when people handle the skull, have a random con-incidence.  When the players start using skills and force powers they will obviously detect nothing.
    The players will assume it is somehow hiding itself and make wild and make specious assumptions.
     
    Perhaps stuff a roll of not paper in the skull (physically if possible) like a message in a bottle, that leads them to the next part of the adventure, in effect making it a sort of MacGuffin.
  17. Like
    jmoschner reacted to derroehre in I find your lack of strain disturbing...   
    Remember Rivals get to play with Talents!
     
    I seperate them from a story point of view in the campaign:
     
    Minions: Individually unimportant.
    The name of every thug in the minion group is completely unimportant. Cantina Thugs, Stormtrooper, etc.
     
    Rivals: Individually interesting.
    Has a name, some relevance in the story/scene. Might be the biggest thug in the room, the barkeeper or some sort of dealer that is somewhat relevant at the moment. Possibly disposable or made up on the fly.
     
    Nemesises: Personally very interesting.
    Will leave a lasting impression on the players or has been built up for some time. The swoop gang leader, system crime lord or moff/governor.
     
    But sometimes the players don't know if someone is a Rival or a Nemesis or he/she/it will be "upgraded" during the campaign.
  18. Like
    jmoschner reacted to FCastor in How to increase Force Rating?   
    I am thinking a better analogy to how a Force user starts and then progresses in FaD/EotE/AoR would be Luke in the OT and eventually beyond, rather than how, say, Anakin or Obi-Wan were in the PT and/or TCW. Force users are not the powerhouses of the PT and the Old Republic, though they may well get there eventually and after they have gained a considerable amount of XP to spend on Specializations, Talents, Skills and Force Powers.
  19. Like
    jmoschner reacted to Garran in Reducing conflict   
    Rather than 'random good deeds' - which usually don't make much sense anyway - reducing the conflict created by an action would best be dealt with by taking responsibility/making amends for the action that generated it. This is mostly a thematic thing, although it could have mechanical costs of some sort as well. IE: if you destroyed someone's property without good cause, you're going to have to (meaningfully) apologize, replace it, perhaps deal with legal ramifications, etc. Essentially, a smaller-scale version of what someone has to do when they've gone fully dark side. Of course, this only works if the character is actually learning something from the experience - if they're routinely smashing stuff up and apologizing afterward, it's not going to be effective anymore.
  20. Like
    jmoschner reacted to tinkerghost in Reducing conflict   
    I think the point Jegergryte is making is that there are certain events in the official games that increase conflict outside of the normal scope of actions - therefore it should be ok to have certain events set up to offer a chance to reduce conflict.
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