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Underachiever599

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  1. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    Been working on it here and there, but I have a busy schedule and haven't been able to make as much time for it as I planned. Look for further updates (a list of races and careers, as well as an adversary list) hopefully in the first week or two of July. Sorry for the delay on this project, but I really want to get it done right!
  2. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    So you're straight up neglecting the fire that Tavi was throwing around in First Lord's Fury? Like, actual torrents of flame that he threw at the Vord Queen when she was attacking his camp? And I'd beg to differ on making plants grow being Earthcrafting, not Woodcrafting. Per The First Lord's Fury: "In Tavi's experience, though, very few people had sufficient respect for the destructive capacities of the gentler crafts. Wood and water." He then proceeds to bring down the wall of Riva with what is described as a use of both Watercrafting and Woodcrafting. Pages 436-442. It's repeatedly described as him reaching out to the plants, and to the seeds, and willing them to grow. Sounds a lot more like Woodcrafting to me. Look at the quote you posted again. "Internalized" crafting. In other words, the crafting he can turn inward. Implying there are types of crafting you can turn outward. Earthcrafting can be turned inward to gain strength, Metalcrafting can be turned inward to gain resilience, Aircrafting can be turned inward to gain enhanced perception, and Watercrafting can be turned inward to be able to sense the emotions of those around you. However, external crafting would encompass things like throwing around fire, or moving a river, or reshaping metal, or building walls out of the ground. Also, Captain's Fury is not Tavi at his peak. It's Tavi while he's still relatively new to the use of Furycrafting, so he hasn't even come close to mastering all of the abilities at his disposal. For a real look at what all types of Furycrafting Tavi is capable of, you have to pay attention to First Lord's Fury, and not just the books that came before. For Gaius, you're ignoring the fact that he was shown to turn his entire body into metal, which is the way Metalcrafters manifest their metal furies, and which is seemingly the most difficult performance of Metalcrafting possible, given that the only other character to ever do so was Araris. So at the very least, we know Gaius was a Metalcrafter of nearly the same caliber as Araris himself. As for the problem with the campaign through Kalare, it wasn't that he was incapable of Earthcrafting. Gaius specifically stated that he couldn't craft while they were in Kalare because if he did, they would immediately get noticed. It was supposed to be a stealth mission, and Kalarus seemingly had a way to detect Gaius the moment Gaius started to use Furycrafting. And when the time came, Gaius did use Earthcrafting just fine to get back on his feet, and also to set off the volcano that wiped out most of Kalare. Gaius was depicted throughout the entire series up until his death as being the best at all types of Furycrafting. He wouldn't be in charge of the entire country of Alera otherwise, given the emphasis on Furycrafting ability that the citizenry had. You saying Alera wasn't passed down to Tavi is factually incorrect. Tavi would not have been able to commune with Alera otherwise. Yes, Alera was also breaking down slowly due to the mosaic being lost, but it was a slow process. In the time between Gaius' death and Alera's demise, she had been passed down to assist Tavi in developing his Furycrafting. Yes, it's true that Alera is an amalgamation of other furies, but that seems to be the case for literally all furies. Thana Lilvia (the giant wind fury that is the wife of the mountain Garados), for example, is made up of countless windmanes. Garados itself is also apparently made up of several earth furies (and presumably fire furies as well, given that Garados turns out to be a volcano). An important thing to note about Alera, however, is that while she is passed down the Gaius bloodline, she is not actually the source of their personal power in Furycrafting. She's mostly a tutor who teaches them how to use all six types of Furycrafting they already have at their disposal. She also assists them in the large-scale grand manipulation of Furycrafting, but always at a terrible cost. Presumably, even with Alera gone, Tavi will still be able to do all the things he was capable of in First Lord's Fury. He just won't be able to ask her to do things for him, like creating a sudden winter storm with a constant eastward wind in the middle of summer. On top of all of this, it's worth pointing out that almost every Aleran has at least a minor talent in all types of Furycrafting. We learn this from Fidelious reminiscing on his time training to be a Cursor, and from snippets in Academ's Fury. They all have at least enough Firecrafting talent to turn on and off Furylamps, they all have at least enough Watercrafting to move around some water in a cup, enough Earthcrafting to be able to use the causeways, ect. So while not every character in the series has 6 furies that they can outwardly manifest, nearly every Aleran has at least a minor talent in all 6, with a particularly strong talent in 1 or 2. With all that being said, we don't know exactly how Furycrafting was changed by Tavi and Alera at the end of First Lord's Fury. All we know is that Furycrafting is now "merit-based" rather than based on bloodline. The way Tavi phrases it, "Those who want more of it should be able to work to get it. It's only fair." The way I interpret that is that anyone can work hard enough to grow talented at any type of Furycrafting. Which is reflected in the rules I came up with for my campaign, which is set several generations after the end of the last book. I back up this interpretation by the fact that Tavi is allowing Canim and Marat to start attending the Aleran academy, which mostly teaches Furycrafting. He mentions this in the same sentence where he talks about accepting the Icemen, who are already known to be Watercrafters. This seems to imply that the Canim and Marat may be beneficiaries of the "merit-based Furycrafting" change. So somehow, beings who have never had access to Furycrafting before might be able to work hard enough to gain it.
  3. Underachiever599

    Silly Thought: Godzilla Genesys

    Thanks for the suggestions, FangGrip! Really helpful I'm currently thinking of three possibilities here. Option 1: Mechagodzilla The players are vanilla humans fighting against a giant kaiju attacking their city, possibly more than one. However, the players have access to a giant fighting robot to combat the kaiju. Option 2: H.E.A.T. The players are vanilla humans with an allied Kaiju NPC. The players are effectively the brains of the operation, finding weaknesses in enemy kaiju and supporting the kaiju on their side through various means. Inspired by the 1999 Godzilla animated series. Option 3: Battle Royale All the players are playing as a kaiju, but each of them has different stats, abilities, and objectives. For the first two options, I'd probably be using vehicle-scale stats for the various kaiju. And of course, coming up with all sorts of fun collateral damage rules. For option 3, I'd have players stat out their monsters like regular player characters, and would give wound thresholds to buildings, cliffsides, ect. I'd also probably use the exploding dice option for 'super' stats. More to come as I think of it.
  4. Underachiever599

    Silly Thought: Godzilla Genesys

    Been rewatching some of the old Godzilla movies lately with a friend who has never seen them, and had a silly idea for a Godzilla Genesys one-off. Leaving this topic here so I can revisit it once I've thought it out some more. If anyone else has ideas to suggest for how to run a Kaiju game, by all means, post away!
  5. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    To address your concerns, the way a I have furycrafting set up currently does make it progressively more expensive to have more furies. An Aleran starts with 1 fury at base level. Then there is a "furycrafting type" tiered talent that grants another fury. So the first time you take it, it's only 5 XP for a 2nd fury. But then if you want a third, it's 10 XP, plus you need another tier 1 talent first. So on and so forth. To get all six furycrafting types, you would have to spend 175 XP, and that's not even touching any of the furycrafting-specific talents. As for Tavi and Gaius having all six, I'm certain they did. We see Tavi utilize Fire fairly often, windcrafting to fly, watercrafting to send messages, metalcrafting and earthcrafting in combat against the Queens, and woodcrafting to bring down the gate at Riva. Alera herself, a great fury passed from Gaius to Tavi, had all elements represented in her. And finally, yes, I do plan on having the campaign set over 100 years after the events of First Lord's Fury. I'll be releasing a document in the next couple weeks detailing the setting I have in mind, as well as a couple adventures that I think may be fun. It's taking me a bit of time to compile and format properly, but hopefully the end results will be worth it.
  6. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    I put the different manifestations of furies on different levels for two reasons. Judging from how common some manifestations are in the books, some just seemed like they may be easier to manifest than others. The second reason is, as you guessed, due to their combat effectiveness. I'm working on statting out furies as adversaries, and some are simply stronger than others, due to the nature of their element. And of course, the manifestation of a metal fury takes a wildly different form, as the crafter's body becomes coated in metal. As for things like Harden and Soften Earth being different talents, it was partly as a way of just increasing the number of Earthcrafting talents. I wanted 20 of each type of talent. 6 Teir 1, 5 Tier 2, 4 Tier 3, 3 Tier 4, and 2 Tier 5. This gave a bit of flexibility within the individual Furycrafting talent pools, so two Earthcrafters with the same XP might still have radically different builds. I also made them separate talents purely because of the amount of uses I could think of off the top of my head for each. With a creative enough mind, either power individually could be quite useful, so I figured it was worth it to keep the two separate and make the players pay the little bit of extra XP for both. You'll notice I did something similar with Brighten Flame and Snuff Flame for Firecrafting.
  7. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    I'm working on compiling other assorted notes on the player races (Aleran, Marat, amd Canim), careers, and an adversary list (including some fun new Vord variants). Expect them sometime next week, if I can find the time.
  8. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    I agree 100% about the Amara/Bernard story. Those characters honestly bored me to tears until the final book.
  9. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    The first book is really hard to get into. But once you're about 70 pages into book 2, the series flies by just like the Dresden Files does.
  10. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    Revisiting this project that I started on a few months back. Over the next few weeks, I'll post some links to documents with my assorted ideas. First off, here's my complete list of custom skills for the various Furycrafting types. Much like how Force use in the Star Wars RPG line is deliberately an experience point sink, I designed Furycrafting to have a wide array of different abilities that would be a heavy tax on characters. Each type of Furycrafting has its own set of 20 talents specific to it, resulting in 120 different talents for Furycrafting alone. On top of that, I included eight setting specific general talents. From my interpretation of the ending of the final book, Furycrafting in the Codex Alera world is now "merit-based," which I take to mean that anyone who puts the time and effort in can become proficient in any type of Furycrafting, rather than it being determined by the circumstances of one's birth. As a result, any Aleran in my campaign will be able to train in any Furycrafting type by taking a ranked talent, much like how the Force Rating talent in the Star Wars RPG could increase one's abilities in the Force. Each Aleran starts with only one type of Furycrafting at character creation, but each purchase of the Furycrafting Type talent will allow them to unlock additional types of Furycrafting. To go with the new mechanic of Furycrafting, and the many talents that come with it, I'm going to be adding Furycrafting as a Skill on the character sheet. Different types of Furycrafting will key off of different attributes, as I laid out in my post above. There's one last detail about Furycrafting to bring up before diving into the talents themselves. In this campaign, I plan on having at least 7 different types of talents. General talents, which are all the ones you can find in the Genesys core book and Realms of Terrinoth that are applicable to this fantasy setting, and then a different set of talents for each type of Furycrafting. Your number of general talents don't count toward your number of Furycrafting talents, and vice versa. For example, you could have three tier 1 general talents, and two tier 2 general talents, but this does not mean that you can go buy a tier 3 Furycrafting talent. If you want a tier 2 Firecrafting talent, for example, you will first have to have purchased two tier 1 Firecrafting talents. Each type of Furycrafting effectively has its own talent pyramid that is kept separate from the other Furycrafting types, and from general talents. This is much like how Strength or Range upgrades in one particular Force power in the Star Wars RPG do not carry over to any other Force powers. Some of the talents I've tossed in here are relatively powerful for their experience cost. However, I tried to base XP costs not just on the power of the talents, but also on the talents' prevalence in the Codex Alera series. For example, let's look at Earthen Might. "Earthen Might: Tier 1 Activation: Active (Incidental) Ranked: No Before Making a Brawl or Melee skill check, the character may suffer 1 strain to add damage to the attack equal to their ranks in Furycrafting. 5 XP" On the surface, that sounds like a really powerful talent, considering how low its XP cost is. However, enhanced physical strength like this is one of the defining features of Earthcrafters in the Codex Alera series, so it would hardly make sense for the talent to be costed around 15-20 XP. I did my best to mitigate this by throwing in additional thematic limits to the talent. For instance, the strain caused by this talent is suffered before attacking, so even if you miss, the strain is still suffered. Thematically, this is because the Earthcrafter is investing the same amount of effort into the swing, regardless of whether or not it hits. In addition, in order to add any extra damage at all, you have to have at least one rank in Furycrafting, which would cost an additional 5 XP. Only when you've invested 35-55 XP into both getting this talent and getting Furycrafting up to rank 3-4 does this talent really start feeling powerful. Thematically, this is explained simply. The more skilled you are at Furycrafting in general, the more you're able to enhance your physical might with Earthcrafting. All of that being said, there's 128 custom talents here. So for any Codex Alera fans out there, please feel free to peruse through this document and tell me what you think. Just remember that some of these talents are pretty much designed to be broken, to fit with how powerful Furycrafters are in the Codex Alera series. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Dt19DJqkySVoUkY-A0ELEwUgn9W0nxGF/view?usp=sharing
  11. At my table, 90% of Destiny Point flips were for upgrading checks. We did a few really fun narrative things with Destiny Points, but most of their uses were purely for dice upgrades of one type or another.
  12. Underachiever599

    What makes a Jedi?

    Minimum Jedi for me: FR 2, at least one rank in Parry and Reflect, and the base powers of Enhance, Sense, and Move. Virtually every youngling in Star Wars should be capable of that much, at least. Anything more is entirely dependent on the character.
  13. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    I hadn't even considered incorporating Force dice into it! I might take a second look at all the stuff I have fleshed out and see whether or not Force dice would be better. Right now, I have a Furycrafting skill, but it pulls from different attributes depending on the type of crafting. Brawn=Earth Agility=Wind Intellect=Water Cunning=Wood Willpower=Metal Presence=Fire And each different Furycrafting type has a wide array of talents that let you do cool and interesting things, like manifesting a fury, tunneling through the earth, increasing the range of your arrows, ect.
  14. Underachiever599

    Codex Alera Genesys

    Has anyone here read the Codex Alera series by Jim Butcher? A few gaming buddies and I are all fans of Butcher's work, and I was recently inspired to do a Codex Alera Genesys game. Probably going to be a one-off, but might become a full campaign if my players dig it enough. With that in mind, I've been working on a massive variety of talents, careers, and races that I plan on posting to this thread as I find the time to do so. For the record, I have made Furycrafting a deliberate experience-sink, much like the Force is in F&D, to balance out Furycrafting with the Canim and Marat, who will not be able to Furycraft in my game (Kitai is an exception, not the rule.) Anyone here have any particular ideas about Codex Alera in Genesys? I'm all ears when it comes to suggestions.
  15. Underachiever599

    3 spec jedi

    Sage/Niman Disciple/Soresu Defender. FR4, plenty of Parry and Reflect, and some cool talent. It's my go-to 'generic Jedi build'
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