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edwardavern

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  1. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Mandalore of the Rings in One Shot Thoughts   
    Oooh... so I love the idea that there's someone else on the ship who's leaving a trail of dead stormtroopers in their wake!!  That's really cool.  Thanks!
     
    Nice, I like this.
  2. Like
    edwardavern reacted to Malashim in One Shot Thoughts   
    Combine it with elements from the movie Passengers and make the ship itself a deathtrap that is about to blow up anytime.
    So engineering crews panicking, trying their best to prevent the systems from collapsing. Doors and elevators are not only hindrances but break down or force the group to take another route. Malfunctioning terminals blow up and hurt PCs/kill NPCs.
    For the climax, you can even make the way they were boarding bugged, so they can't leave unless they find a way to bypass some of the malfunctions while the original crew has taken all escape pods. Although thats not too bad as some of them exploded...
    Maybe it is a bit much for a one-shot with PVP in mind but it can make things interesting 😄
  3. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Mandalore of the Rings in One Shot Thoughts   
    Hi all
    I've been out of the game for a couple of years, but what with quarantine and everything I'm running my first session in a while, as a one-shot.  The adventure is inspired by Chapter 6 of The Mandalorian, where the party (none of whom trusts each other) have to infiltrate a ship to recover... something.
    The ship is an Imperial transport ship, with a regiment of Stormtroopers on board, so that's one very obvious obstacle, but I was wondering what other obstacles might exist, other than the standard locked doors, elevator shafts, and so on.  Brain's a little rusty after too much time away from the dice, and I'm struggling to come up with original, exciting hazards.
    Also - because why walk if you can try to fly - I'm giving all the characters secret agendas that conflict with one another, and I'm anticipating some PvP, which I've never run before.  Does anyone have any tips on how to do that well?
    Thanks in advance.
  4. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from DurosSpacer in Player feels like a passenger   
    One of my players recently told me that, although she's enjoying the game, she feels a bit like a passenger - that she reacts to stuff, rather than ever making decisions.  She accepts that part of this is because she's never really taken the time to flesh out her character (so, in her own words, her character is "plot-driven" rather than "character-driven"), and also is aware that it's partly because her character is quite a quiet, sneaky sort of dug, who isn't instinctively at the forefront of what the party decides to do.
    I'm talking to her to see if we can find ways for her to feel more involved in the decision-making, but I just wondered if other GMs out there had had similar issues, and (if so) how did you address them?
    Thanks in advance.
  5. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from VadersMarchKazoo in How to: Chase   
    On a slightly different note, you can also apply the Chase mechanics to things that don't feel like chases, but actually are.  So, for example, tracking someone across the Jundland Wastes might require each party to roll Survival checks (or Perception, Skullduggery, Deception, Outer Rim, or something else if they can think of it) as the tracker gains on their quarry, or the quarry manages to conceal their tracks.  A very similar thing can be done with Streetwise (or Underworld, Charm, Coercion, Core Worlds) in the depths of Coruscant, as a bounty hunter tries to close in on their target by asking the right questions to the right people.
  6. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from jmlane in Resilience Checks   
    I use Resilience checks when PCs exceed their Wound Threshold.  Instead of instantly becoming incapacitated, I let them make a check to see if they can limp on to the end of the Encounter (although they still suffer the crit, of course).  Makes them slightly less glass cannon-y, and brings the skill into more prominence.
  7. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Archlyte in Cool alternative to Asteroid Field...   
    My players want more space encounters, and I've already used "ship graveyard".  I'm thinking space minefield could be fun, but it would be great to have some other cool space environments in which to set encounters.
     
  8. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Urbane Spaceman in Player feels like a passenger   
    This is a good point - I feel like she selected a motivation from the CR list (can't remember it off the top of my head), but hasn't really thought about it at all.  I'll push her on this and see what she says.
     
    Yes.  I'm working on this - it's definitely the most interesting aspect of the character so far.  Going to be building on that.
     
    I agree in principle, but in practice I can't seem to help making the effort.  #noyouredesperatetopleaseeveryone
     
    This is a great idea.  Totally going to do this.
     
    Yes, that's also a good idea.
     
    Thanks all.  Really helpful stuff.
  9. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from SavageBob in Player feels like a passenger   
    This is a good point - I feel like she selected a motivation from the CR list (can't remember it off the top of my head), but hasn't really thought about it at all.  I'll push her on this and see what she says.
     
    Yes.  I'm working on this - it's definitely the most interesting aspect of the character so far.  Going to be building on that.
     
    I agree in principle, but in practice I can't seem to help making the effort.  #noyouredesperatetopleaseeveryone
     
    This is a great idea.  Totally going to do this.
     
    Yes, that's also a good idea.
     
    Thanks all.  Really helpful stuff.
  10. Haha
    edwardavern got a reaction from Rimsen in Lightsaber Colours   
    One of my PCs was blinded, so I gave him an invisible lightsaber crystal - now he can't see the blade, but neither can anyone else...
  11. Confused
    edwardavern got a reaction from Kilcannon in Lightsaber Colours   
    One of my PCs was blinded, so I gave him an invisible lightsaber crystal - now he can't see the blade, but neither can anyone else...
  12. Like
    edwardavern reacted to kaosoe in Lightsaber Colours   
    I typically just let my players pick their color. It's just flavor text, after all.
  13. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from DurosSpacer in System Strain House Rule   
    Been working on sprucing up ship combat with a load of house rules, including plenty of stuff from these forums (thanks to all, BTW).
    One of the things I want to do is to bring the party mechanic into space combat a bit more.  I'm thinking of Han Solo running around the Millennium Falcon trying to fix the hyperdrive while dodging TIE fighter blasts, or Kaylee setting Serenity up for a crazy ivan - trying to capture that slightly mad feeling of being down in engineering, rewiring things and putting out fires and staggering around in a Star Trek way when the ship gets hit.
    I was playing Captain Sonar recently, and one thing I quite liked was the way different components went offline and had to be repaired in order to be used (albeit in a somewhat abstract way).  I was thinking that instead of each ship having System Strain, each system (e.g. shields, hyperdrive, sublight engines, etc.) would have System Strain.  Over the course of a combat, the ship's mechanic would have to work to keep different systems operational, either by repairing the System Strain or simply redistributing it, deciding which system was most important.  If a system exceeded its threshold, it would go offline; maybe if it exceeded its threshold, it would suffer a Component Critical hit.  This would give the mechanic some actual decisions to make, rather than simply "make a generic Mechanics check".
    Anyone have any thoughts on how that might work/not work?
  14. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Lukey84 in Resilience Checks   
    I use Resilience checks when PCs exceed their Wound Threshold.  Instead of instantly becoming incapacitated, I let them make a check to see if they can limp on to the end of the Encounter (although they still suffer the crit, of course).  Makes them slightly less glass cannon-y, and brings the skill into more prominence.
  15. Like
    edwardavern reacted to penpenpen in Snipers in combat?   
    Ok, Trampy? You are being overly literal and narrow-minded again.
    If hide in the bushes and shoot at people, eg snipe at them, I am a sniper. Of course, in the army I wouldn't be called a sniper, because they use it as an official term and thus add additional meaning to the word, as in "someone we have recognized as fulfilling our skill requirements for the job of being a sniper". Then again, if I hide in the bushes and shoot at the army, you know what they're going to shout?
    "Take cover! It's a sniper!"
    I've been the army too (well, an army) and learned one of the most important lessons of all; what something means in the military is not always what it means in the real world. 
    And just so you don't have to bother:
    I know you love your dictionary definitions.
    And that's not getting into you completely neglecting my point about giving minions talents in lieu of skills, if you want a skilled sniper minion, but hey, that's par for the course, so I'm not mad. Nor surprised.
    ...
    Also, didn't you bring up your experience from the Air Force to prove you were a qualified expert on nap-of-the-earth-flying a while back? You were an Army sniper too? I didn't think it'd be possible to find the time with all the low-level flying. That's impressive, man.
  16. Like
    edwardavern reacted to Cael in Snipers in combat?   
    I ran a session that was all about hunting a sniper that was devastating a Rebel force on a jungle planet. I gave the players a topographic map of the area, and they used that to help them triangulate the sniper’s position based on the holes his sniper rifle left in soldiers and equipment. They had a Rebel artillery team drop smoke rounds on the sniper and then they stormed his position and took him out in a hand to hand fight. Good time!
  17. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Benjan Meruna in XP for Missing Players?   
    I award a small amount of XP to players who miss sessions.
    As other people have mentioned, disparity between XP in this system is not really a problem - because XP doesn't generally affect things like wounds, strain, or even characteristics, the fact is that a 25XP Marauder is still going to be more effective in combat than a 600XP Scholar, and a 25XP Charmer is always going to be better in social situations than a 600XP Heavy.  So one character having less XP is not a big deal.
    In addition, a lot of my players are inexperienced roleplayers.  So I like to make sure that if they get new talents or Force Powers or skills, they have a chance to get used to them.  If they miss a session or two, spend it on talents and suddenly have a load of extra stuff to think about, I feel it can be a bit overwhelming for them.  But that's just my take.
  18. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Rimsen in System Strain House Rule   
    Hmm. I don’t mind a little bit extra book-keeping, and I don’t anticipate the “only worried about Main body”’problem with the way I’m going to break it down. However, you’re right that I haven’t thought about how I’m going to extend this to NPCs, or multiple PC ships. Good point. Will think.
     
    Yeah, it could slow things down a bit, but I want to give the engineer some actual decisions - I would keep it simple enough that “puzzling out” wouldn’t necessarily take too long, but while I really like your narrative suggestions, they don’t actually give the engineer any decision to make: it’s just the GM saying what happens, and the engineer having no real choice but to fix it. Does that make sense?
  19. Like
    edwardavern reacted to HappyDaze in System Strain House Rule   
    That's going to be a lot of extra bookkeeping. It reminds me of some of the Palladium games where every location of a ship/vehicle/mecha had MDC capacity but 90% of the time nobody cared about anything but the "Main Body" anyway. Also, are you intending to do the same for NPC ships? Either way, it's going to get really cumbersome as soon as the PCs are using 2+ ships (which is something that starts to make starship/vehicle combat more interesting--and survivable).
  20. Like
    edwardavern reacted to Kualan in System Strain House Rule   
    My initial gut feeling is that it would risk slowing down the action if during a high-energy space battle the Mechanic is spending his turn trying to puzzle out the optimal distribution of their remaining System Strain between the different components.
    An easier way to capture the frenetic craziness of trying to keep a ship together whilst under attack is to make creative use of Threat/Advantage and GM/player description. For example, his first "generic Mechanics check" could be focused on keeping the turrets from overheating but - oh no! - that Threat he generated means the engines are now at risk of combustion and he's going to have to spend a manuever sprinting to the other end of the ship and he has to blindly navigate his way through the now smoke-filled engine room before he can make his next Mechanics check to get the situation under control again.
  21. Like
    edwardavern reacted to kaosoe in System Strain House Rule   
    Sounds interesting. I like where your head is at, it just needs some refinement. Kualan has some great advice. This is beginning to sound similar to the Critical Hit chart. Perhaps you could leverage that in some way. Or come up with a chart of your own to roll on.
  22. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Underachiever599 in Narrative Money   
    Hi all
    I'm preparing to revamp my campaign a bit.  I've played this system long enough now to know what works well and what annoys the crap out of me.  And among other things, that means stepping back from some of the really nitty-gritty book-keeping stuff that - I can only assume - was designed to appeal to D&D fans.  Do we need the specs for a million types of blaster pistol?  Or attachments that can only be fixed to blaster rifles, meaning you can't (RAW) give certain effects to slugthrowers or blaster pistols?  I like the fluff around a lot of this stuff - that's all cool lore - but I find the mechanics seem at odds with the core "narrative" concept of the game.  It's unnecessarily fiddly.  (The 'Genesys' CR, which obviously doesn't have space for all this stuff, is actually much more streamlined in this area as a result.  But I digress.)
    This brings me on to money.
    Take a show like Firefly.  Because, let's not kid ourselves, 90% of us are basing our EotE campaigns on that vibe.  That's literally what the vibe was built around.  Find a crew.  Keep flying.  All that jazz.  And in that show, they're always struggling for money.  Except for the episode when they aren't.  But we are very, very rarely told how much money.  We're just given a general sense that, for example, River's bounty could buy a better ship than Serenity, or that a compression coil is expensive enough that Mal won't fork out on a new one even when his mechanic tells him he should (fool).  In fact, I think the only time that explicit amounts of platinum/credits are discussed, it's when Simon tells the crew how much medicine costs.
    Even in Star Wars, amounts of money aren't really discussed.  I mean, sure, we know that Obi-Wan offers Han 17,000cr to travel to Alderaan, but the number isn't really important: what's important is that it's a lot of money, enough to get Solo out of a bit of trouble.  Even in the prequels, which opens with a Trade War, the only mention we get of money is that 20,000 Republic Credits are not considered a suitable currency on Alderaan.  That's it.  Because what matters narratively is that they don't have enough money to buy the parts they need ("No money, no parts, no deal"), so that Qui-Gon can come up with some hairbrained scheme involving illegal gambling, risking the life of an underage slave, and an enjoyable but unnecessarily long race sequence.  The amounts are not important.  All this fiddling with 25cr for a medpac, or 500cr for a blaster pistol, or whatever, seems folly - and is, I suspect, partly a hangover from D&D and partly something borrowed from computer games, where keeping track of lots of tiny numbers is extremely easy because... well, because that's basically what computers do.
    So, I'm thinking of developing a system where money is just handwaved.  The party either has enough money, or they don't.  If they've recently done a job, they can afford cooler stuff than if they hadn't recently done a job; if it's been a while since they had any success, maybe they aren't able to afford fuel and the tanks are nearly dry.  Narrative play.
    But I'm sure there are some massive holes in this kind of thinking.  Most significantly, I can see that not having credits to reward players with might make them feel a bit futile.  I'm going to discuss it with them, and see what they think, but in the meantime I figured I'd ask the wise and benevolent community of the FFG forums to point out all the ways in which this is a terrible idea, and why I should just give up GMing and go and herd nerfs for the rest of my life.
    Thanks in advance.
  23. Like
    edwardavern got a reaction from Mark Caliber in Narrative Money   
    I obviously meant Tatooine.  No idea what happened there...!
     
    I somehow missed the post originally.  That's awesome.  I mean, it's literally the exact opposite of what I'm trying to do... but it's still awesome.
     
    Oooh, wow, I somehow missed this one as well.  That's... interesting!  I have no idea if it would work, or if I even like it - why is there a random element, after all? - but it's a really interesting way of thinking about it.
     
    Fuel and docking fees are two things I started doing and then instantly regretted.  It became so unnecessarily fiddly, and I never could get the amounts to work - either they were too harsh, or just not large enough to be interesting.  It was fun crunching the numbers as an exercise, but in-game it just became a chore.
     
    I'm kind of intrigued by an idea where players have an abstract amount of resources (X units), but those resources have to be committed to things.  Maybe ship maintenance/fuel requires 4 units to be committed, for example; the players can take resources out of that pot, but as soon as they go below the threshold the starts to break down.  Maybe, as with VtM, players can commit X units to lifestyle, or to weapon maintenance, or something.  Buying small things is handwaved; larger things maybe reduce the player's available pool...
    ...although TBH, now that I write that down, it doesn't feel like it's going to be any less book-keepy.  Hmm.
  24. Like
    edwardavern reacted to Mark Caliber in Narrative Money   
    Cotangentially . . .
    I acquired a Star Wars Monopoly box and realized that the money in there is star wars money.
    So at the beginning of the session, I ask the players how much dough their characters are hauling around and each time we have a transaction we are passing actual notes around.
    Taking a taxi ride?  How far?  30 - 40 credits.  What about the tip?  Getting a bite to eat?  that's 20 credits.
    Need to buy a replacement blaster?  Do you have enough cash on hand?  
    I'm also an accountant so keeping gaming ledgers is a breeze.
  25. Haha
    edwardavern got a reaction from Tramp Graphics in Narrative Money   
    Hmm, yes, removing a fiddly system to replace it with a fiddly system is a bit pointless.
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