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EdgeOfDreams

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  1. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from fingerzz in Strength of schedule   
    From the Tournament Rules:
     
    An easier way to explain it is that your Strength of Schedule (or SoS) is the average of the wins-per-round-played of your opponents. An opponent who played 3 rounds and won 2 of them has a wins-per-round of 2/3. Add up all your opponents' wins-per-round numbers and divide by the total number of opponents you had. (Part of the funky wording is to account correctly for players who drop from the tournament midway through.)
    So, if you played a 3-round tournament, and your opponents scored 1 win, 2 wins, and 2 wins respectively (and everyone played all three rounds), you'd have an SoS of (1/3 + 2/3 + 2/3 ) / 3 = 5/9 or about .55
    SoS is currently used as a secondary tiebreaker after MoV. It used to be a primary tiebreaker in an older version of the tournament rules, but it's subject to distortions due to players dropping after they lose a couple rounds early in the tournament, then dropping instead of going on to win some of their later, easier match-ups. Thus, MoV is considered preferable because it's primarily based on your own game results.
  2. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Izeeto in Snapshot - does it count as a secondary?   
    Yes, it does need to be in arc. The card doesn't need to say it because Secondary Weapons are restricted to in-arc only by default. Notice how every secondary weapon torpedo and missile card says nothing about needing to be in arc? Yet the general rule that secondary weapons must be in-arc applies to all of them. It applies the same way to Snap Shot.
     
    To put it another way - the default assumption for attacks is that they must be in arc. Every attack that lets you shoot at something not in your arc explicitly says so - Turret secondary weapons, turret primaries, and Hot Shot Blaster. Snap Shot doesn't give you permission to fire outside your arc, therefore it is restricted to in-arc.
  3. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from JJ48 in Question on the Clan Seal cards..   
    Directly, it does nothing. It only affects interactions with other cards that care which clan that character belongs to. Way of the Crab and Way of the Scorpion are two good examples. Right now, these "Seal of X" cards are not a big deal, but they might be in the future. As more cards appear that target characters of specific clans, being able to treat a neutral or cross-clan character as part of your main clan could be extremely useful.
  4. Like
    EdgeOfDreams reacted to Huzbek in New stronghold store kits   
    I need that borderland defender clan role card NOW! 
  5. Like
    EdgeOfDreams reacted to InquisitorM in Talisman of the Sun   
    People really need to stop trying to build facsimiles of reality when resolving card effects.
    When you activate Talisman of the Sun, you move the ring from one province to another. That's literally all there is to it. The conflict doesn't 'move' to the new province. It isn't a new conflict. No-one 'relocates'. Nobody 'teleports'.
    There are some pieces of card in your conflict zone, some pieces of card in your home zone, and a cardboard circle on the province of one of the two players. That cardboard circle moves.
    That is all.
    Anything else is people trying to make stuff up to explain things in a narrative sense.
    Don't do that; it's just game mechanics. I understand why people try to do that, but don't. You confuse yourself and you confuse other people.
    Just to be clear:
    You pick up the contested ring and you put it down somewhere else.
    Since the ring indicates which province is being attacked, the province that is being attacked has changed. The only possible side effect is that the new province might have to be turned face-up. Characters in the conflict zone are still in the conflict zone. The province that may get broken is still 'the one with the ring on it'.
    Think game mechanics, not fluff.
     
  6. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Huzbek in Cards that extend characters longevity and attachments.   
    On the flip side, Crab is supposed to be the clan that wins on defense, but we didn't get anything nearly as defensively good as Mirumoto's Fury.
  7. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Waywardpaladin in Cards that extend characters longevity and attachments.   
    On the flip side, Crab is supposed to be the clan that wins on defense, but we didn't get anything nearly as defensively good as Mirumoto's Fury.
  8. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from OokamiGauru in Clan Packs - What Do You Want to See?   
    I like this idea. It provides a lot of potential variety without quite the combinatoric explosion that having 8+ full factions would lead to. The really cool part is you could print a bunch of Mantis conflict deck cards with influence costs now, and then later if/when Mantis finally becomes a great clan, you introduce a Mantis stronghold and dynasty cards, while leveraging the conflict cards that already exist. That could cut down on the problems late-to-the-table factions always seem to have (e.g. Scum in X-Wing playing catch-up for years).
  9. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from JolOfNar in Clan Packs - What Do You Want to See?   
    Ideas for Crab themes or cards:
    More berserkers, scouts, skirmishers, ambushers, etc. (Hida/Haruma families) More Kuni shugenja More Yasuki traders and courtiers (economic engine cards, with the potential for Mantis splashing someday) More holdings and Kaiu cards that interact with them Siege engines Characters tainted by the shadowlands An event or attachment that lets you accuse an enemy of being tainted
  10. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Zura in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  11. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Mandalore525 in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  12. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Vlad3theImpaler in Disciples of the Void - New Clan Pack   
    Ooh, yes. "Purity of the Phoenix. - Phoenix Clan Only - Your influence is set to 0 and cannot be changed.  - <some crazy good/fun benefit>"
  13. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from dewbie420 in Potential New Player: What to Get   
    Both!
    Start with a single core set. That's basically the demo game. See how you like it.
    To play the full standard tournament game, you either need a second core set or one core plus a bunch of the expansion packs. Most players will recommend a second core set, because the core just has so many good cards.
    To play competitively, you probably want a third core set and most or all of the expansions.
    Two or three cores is enough to let two players each make their own full tournament-legal deck and play a game against each other. With only two cores, your options will be limited, though.
    Because this is a game that depends on deck building, if you're supplying all the cards for two players, you're going to have to rebuild decks every time someone decides they want to try a different clan.
    Fortunately, because this is an LCG, not a CCG, the expansions are not randomized. Everyone who buys "Tears of Ameterasu" gets the same cards as everyone else who bought it. That means, in the long run, this game is much cheaper to keep up with than games like Magic where you are relying on randomized boosters or buying singles on the secondary market to build a competitive deck.
     
  14. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Smythetech in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  15. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Yogo Gohei in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  16. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Tonbo Karasu in Disciples of the Void - New Clan Pack   
    Ooh, yes. "Purity of the Phoenix. - Phoenix Clan Only - Your influence is set to 0 and cannot be changed.  - <some crazy good/fun benefit>"
  17. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from OsramTaleka in Disciples of the Void - New Clan Pack   
    Ooh, yes. "Purity of the Phoenix. - Phoenix Clan Only - Your influence is set to 0 and cannot be changed.  - <some crazy good/fun benefit>"
  18. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Brekekekiwi in Disciples of the Void - New Clan Pack   
    Ooh, yes. "Purity of the Phoenix. - Phoenix Clan Only - Your influence is set to 0 and cannot be changed.  - <some crazy good/fun benefit>"
  19. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from HirumaShigure in Disciples of the Void - New Clan Pack   
    Ooh, yes. "Purity of the Phoenix. - Phoenix Clan Only - Your influence is set to 0 and cannot be changed.  - <some crazy good/fun benefit>"
  20. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from theninthguardian in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  21. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from ichaos1985 in Is this game like magic the gathering?   
    Here are some comparisons between Magic and L5R:
    Resource generation: Magic: you start out with no mana. You play lands and other cards which generate mana. As the game goes on, the amount of mana you can generate each turn ramps up, so you can play bigger and bigger cards. Every deck has to dedicate a large number of cards just to generating mana. L5R: you start out with 7 fate. You gain 7 more fate every round. So you can play big cards right away and don't have to worry about ramp up. There are cards that can generate extra fate, but not a lot of them. There are other game mechanics that reward you with Fate for various choices you can make. Your deck is mostly cards that actually do something. Win conditions: Magic: you start with 20 life. You lose if you run out of life or cards in your deck. There are some other cards that provide alternate win conditions, but they're rare and hard to use. L5R: you start with 10 to 12 Honor and 5 provinces, one of which is your stronghold. You win if you break 3 of your opponent's normal provinces and their one stronghold. You lose if you run out of honor. You win if you gain enough honor to hit 25 total. Honor/dishonor wins are rare-ish, but a valid strategy. Running out of cards in a deck makes you lose 5 honor and reshuffle your discards into a new deck. Alternate win condition cards don't exist yet. Decks: Magic: one deck, made up of creatures, lands, spells, and artifacts. L5R: two decks. Your Dynasty deck is made up mostly of characters, but can also have Holdings, which are defensive buffs to your provinces that also have triggered effects. Your Conflict deck is mostly made up of events and attachments, but can contain a limited number of characters as well. Creatures/characters: Magic: creatures have offensive and defensive stats. They stay in play until destroyed by combat or other card effects. Most creatures have one set cost. L5R: characters have military and political stats, which act as both offensive and defensive numbers depending on what type of conflict you're in. They only stay in play for one round by default. Every character has a base cost. For each Fate you pay beyond that base cost, the character stays in play for 1 additional round. Cards that destroy enemy characters are rare and often have steep costs or drawbacks. Turn order: Magic: one player takes their full turn, casting spells, summoning creatures, and declaring combat, then the other player takes their full turn. L5R: The round proceeds in phases, and both players act in each phase. First, players take turns summoning characters. Then both players draw cards. Then both players take turns declaring conflicts. Then both players do cleanup. There is a "first player" token that determines who acts first in each phase. At the end of each round, the first player token is passed to the other player. Card draw and hands: Magic: One hand. Draw one card per turn. Cards that let you draw extra cards or search for other cards are common. L5R: One hand of conflict cards and one pseudo-hand of Dynasty cards that are face-up on your provinces. Each round, the Dynasty cards you played the round before are replaced, so you always have a "hand" of 4 Dynasty cards. For Conflict cards, you get to choose how many cards to draw each round, from 1 to 5. If you draw more than your opponent does, you have to pay the difference to them in Honor, which can push one player closer to an Honor win or a Dishonor loss. Cards that let you draw extra cards are less common than in Magic. Cards that let you search for specific other cards are rare. Insta-win Combos: Magic: insta-win combos are fairly common. Many decks are built around surviving until you get your big combo, then suddenly winning if your opponent can't stop you. L5R: insta-win combos do not exist. Most decks are based around either attacking aggressively to try to win the game early with strong attacks, or playing defensively to build up long-term resource advantages before attacking. Combat: Magic: you attack the other player to do damage to them. Their creatures can intervene by blocking your creatures. When creatures fight each other, the losers are often destroyed. Each player gets one chance to attack per turn. L5R: you attack the other player's provinces to break them. Their characters can defend. Losing a fight does not do anything directly negative to your characters. Even if you didn't break a province, you still get a special action called a "ring effect" if you win an attack. Each round, there is the potential for up to 4 conflicts (2 attacks per player). Characters are bowed (tapped) after they participate in a conflict, so choosing which characters to use in each conflict is critical. I could probably write more, but this should give you a good starting idea of just how different they are.
     
  22. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Vlad3theImpaler in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  23. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Doji Tori in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  24. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Mangod in Wait! Dragons to come???!!!   
    Phoenix clan got a huge mythical phoenix, with an oversized fate cost and a powerful special ability.
    If Crab clan doesn't get a giant enemy crab with a glowing red weak spot you can strike for massive damage, I will be very disappointed.
  25. Like
    EdgeOfDreams got a reaction from Notorious I.D.E. in Potential New Player: What to Get   
    Both!
    Start with a single core set. That's basically the demo game. See how you like it.
    To play the full standard tournament game, you either need a second core set or one core plus a bunch of the expansion packs. Most players will recommend a second core set, because the core just has so many good cards.
    To play competitively, you probably want a third core set and most or all of the expansions.
    Two or three cores is enough to let two players each make their own full tournament-legal deck and play a game against each other. With only two cores, your options will be limited, though.
    Because this is a game that depends on deck building, if you're supplying all the cards for two players, you're going to have to rebuild decks every time someone decides they want to try a different clan.
    Fortunately, because this is an LCG, not a CCG, the expansions are not randomized. Everyone who buys "Tears of Ameterasu" gets the same cards as everyone else who bought it. That means, in the long run, this game is much cheaper to keep up with than games like Magic where you are relying on randomized boosters or buying singles on the secondary market to build a competitive deck.
     
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