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CaineHoA

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  1. I read in a Legion post that they added Legion to the dice app, yet my app (Android) neither features them nor gets an update. Any hints or updates on this?
  2. This is what random means. Maybe on the first point companies are generous and do it that way. The second point however is not possible to control. Even if FFG would try to have "sets of boxes" those would ge split up eventually. How could you (even if they wanted to, which i dont think they have a reason) make sure that there is a full set of legendaries within 6 boxes? That just doesn't work out.
  3. Yes it should also count when do focus icon is rolled.
  4. Copilot is very strong against some pilots who need their focus for defense. Trick shot can be combined with the never played Tactical Jammer.
  5. I can only agree to thatdave. Its what i wouldve said next as well. Its totally possible that his way of rolling the dice is influencing the roll more than a bubble in any of them.
  6. But we have CaineHoA feeling that everyhign is going to be fine. lol
  7. When you roll a die, it doesn't just flip once and slam down on a result. It rolls many times until the force dissipates to a level so low that it doesn't have enough to flip again. At that stage, or where a die is on the brink of flipping; an air bubble does have a big effect. You're not comparing the force of your arm to the air bubble. You're looking at the effect of major inclusions on a die that is on the brink of flipping on its final roll. If it's weighted away from blanks, you're not getting a blank. Even if the force goes down through bumbing on the table and in the situation you are describing the orientation of the die towards the surface is very random because of those bumps/jumps of the die before the force dissipates. So while you are correct that the force gets less and less i still doubt that little off balance at the end of a roll will do much about the overall roll. Of course i didnt calculate it. But the effect you describe is still very slim if you look at how many possible ways the die could have turned before that even coming into effect. Also i think it will effect only a tiny amount of rolls that if you take away everything else, like friction and all the other forces, exactly the amount of off weight will influence the die tipping over. Its still only one effect of many. Take weighted dice to Vegas, and then use your explanation to let them allow you to use them. If the weight only effects 1 dice per round or every 2 rounds or every 3 rounds that is huge, that could be as strong as palpatine. They are making money of of it so yes every little bit off statistics count. We are playing a game. and i still highly doublt it would be even one die each game. Excellent we have your highly doubt to counter the OP's experience of his dice rolling extremely hot every game for several months. I just state my opinion about how physics work out here. Everyone can read it or ignore it. His observation has nothing to do with the facts of if this minor difference in dice actually has any effect. You can believe it or and you can think about what i wrote or let it be. Saying that his observations even if its over several month is the better truth just isnt correct. What have you done to verify your theory on his dice? I believe taking his actual experience over your theory is indeed correct. While i was posting this he showed actual data showing the dice are indeed hot and would indeed effect the game. I would bet with you that if 100 random ppl would also note their dice results over the next 500 rolls that his actual results he posted above are indeed above avarage but a lot of ppl wuld have similar results while most would be closer to the average and several would be as much lower as he is above the average. Sry its not a prove of his theory. of course i also dont prove my theory because i cant prove it. I neither have the equipment nor the kowledge of the exact physical calculation. Thats why i said my theory is about my knowledge of physics, i didnt even claim to prove it. yes that is how variance works... thanks? The point is his dice are rolling above average, they should not be used. why are you against this? Your first part of the sentence explain why your second part still might be wrong. His stastistics could change back to avarage ober another 2000 rolls. Thats how variance works. Only because the first 500 oder 100 attemps are above avarage it doesnt mean that the next 500 will also be above average. Of course if he keeps writing it down its getting more and more clear if the dice roll consitently above average. But what is the consequence of this? Its still no prove that all the dice of the same manufacturer roll above average. Its also not a prove that the original dice roll average. Do you really want everyone taking part in a tournament roll their dice 500 times and all above average have to throw away their dice?
  8. When you roll a die, it doesn't just flip once and slam down on a result. It rolls many times until the force dissipates to a level so low that it doesn't have enough to flip again. At that stage, or where a die is on the brink of flipping; an air bubble does have a big effect. You're not comparing the force of your arm to the air bubble. You're looking at the effect of major inclusions on a die that is on the brink of flipping on its final roll. If it's weighted away from blanks, you're not getting a blank. Even if the force goes down through bumbing on the table and in the situation you are describing the orientation of the die towards the surface is very random because of those bumps/jumps of the die before the force dissipates. So while you are correct that the force gets less and less i still doubt that little off balance at the end of a roll will do much about the overall roll. Of course i didnt calculate it. But the effect you describe is still very slim if you look at how many possible ways the die could have turned before that even coming into effect. Also i think it will effect only a tiny amount of rolls that if you take away everything else, like friction and all the other forces, exactly the amount of off weight will influence the die tipping over. Its still only one effect of many. Take weighted dice to Vegas, and then use your explanation to let them allow you to use them. If the weight only effects 1 dice per round or every 2 rounds or every 3 rounds that is huge, that could be as strong as palpatine. They are making money of of it so yes every little bit off statistics count. We are playing a game. and i still highly doublt it would be even one die each game. Excellent we have your highly doubt to counter the OP's experience of his dice rolling extremely hot every game for several months. I just state my opinion about how physics work out here. Everyone can read it or ignore it. His observation has nothing to do with the facts of if this minor difference in dice actually has any effect. You can believe it or and you can think about what i wrote or let it be. Saying that his observations even if its over several month is the better truth just isnt correct. What have you done to verify your theory on his dice? I believe taking his actual experience over your theory is indeed correct. While i was posting this he showed actual data showing the dice are indeed hot and would indeed effect the game. I would bet with you that if 100 random ppl would also note their dice results over the next 500 rolls that his actual results he posted above are indeed above avarage but a lot of ppl wuld have similar results while most would be closer to the average and several would be as much lower as he is above the average. Sry its not a prove of his theory. of course i also dont prove my theory because i cant prove it. I neither have the equipment nor the kowledge of the exact physical calculation. Thats why i said my theory is about my knowledge of physics, i didnt even claim to prove it.
  9. When you roll a die, it doesn't just flip once and slam down on a result. It rolls many times until the force dissipates to a level so low that it doesn't have enough to flip again. At that stage, or where a die is on the brink of flipping; an air bubble does have a big effect. You're not comparing the force of your arm to the air bubble. You're looking at the effect of major inclusions on a die that is on the brink of flipping on its final roll. If it's weighted away from blanks, you're not getting a blank. Even if the force goes down through bumbing on the table and in the situation you are describing the orientation of the die towards the surface is very random because of those bumps/jumps of the die before the force dissipates. So while you are correct that the force gets less and less i still doubt that little off balance at the end of a roll will do much about the overall roll. Of course i didnt calculate it. But the effect you describe is still very slim if you look at how many possible ways the die could have turned before that even coming into effect. Also i think it will effect only a tiny amount of rolls that if you take away everything else, like friction and all the other forces, exactly the amount of off weight will influence the die tipping over. Its still only one effect of many. Take weighted dice to Vegas, and then use your explanation to let them allow you to use them. If the weight only effects 1 dice per round or every 2 rounds or every 3 rounds that is huge, that could be as strong as palpatine. They are making money of of it so yes every little bit off statistics count. We are playing a game. and i still highly doublt it would be even one die each game. Excellent we have your highly doubt to counter the OP's experience of his dice rolling extremely hot every game for several months. I just state my opinion about how physics work out here. Everyone can read it or ignore it. His observation has nothing to do with the facts of if this minor difference in dice actually has any effect. You can believe it or and you can think about what i wrote or let it be. Saying that his observations even if its over several month is the better truth just isnt correct.
  10. When you roll a die, it doesn't just flip once and slam down on a result. It rolls many times until the force dissipates to a level so low that it doesn't have enough to flip again. At that stage, or where a die is on the brink of flipping; an air bubble does have a big effect. You're not comparing the force of your arm to the air bubble. You're looking at the effect of major inclusions on a die that is on the brink of flipping on its final roll. If it's weighted away from blanks, you're not getting a blank. Even if the force goes down through bumbing on the table and in the situation you are describing the orientation of the die towards the surface is very random because of those bumps/jumps of the die before the force dissipates. So while you are correct that the force gets less and less i still doubt that little off balance at the end of a roll will do much about the overall roll. Of course i didnt calculate it. But the effect you describe is still very slim if you look at how many possible ways the die could have turned before that even coming into effect. Also i think it will effect only a tiny amount of rolls that if you take away everything else, like friction and all the other forces, exactly the amount of off weight will influence the die tipping over. Its still only one effect of many. Take weighted dice to Vegas, and then use your explanation to let them allow you to use them. If the weight only effects 1 dice per round or every 2 rounds or every 3 rounds that is huge, that could be as strong as palpatine. They are making money of of it so yes every little bit off statistics count. We are playing a game. and i still highly doublt it would be even one die each game.
  11. When you roll a die, it doesn't just flip once and slam down on a result. It rolls many times until the force dissipates to a level so low that it doesn't have enough to flip again. At that stage, or where a die is on the brink of flipping; an air bubble does have a big effect. You're not comparing the force of your arm to the air bubble. You're looking at the effect of major inclusions on a die that is on the brink of flipping on its final roll. If it's weighted away from blanks, you're not getting a blank. Even if the force goes down through bumbing on the table and in the situation you are describing the orientation of the die towards the surface is very random because of those bumps/jumps of the die before the force dissipates. So while you are correct that the force gets less and less i still doubt that little off balance at the end of a roll will do much about the overall roll. Of course i didnt calculate it. But the effect you describe is still very slim if you look at how many possible ways the die could have turned before that even coming into effect. Also i think it will effect only a tiny amount of rolls that if you take away everything else, like friction and all the other forces, exactly the amount of off weight will influence the die tipping over. Its still only one effect of many.
  12. Now pls calculate the force with which dice are rolled and then think about the weight difference on one of the sides with 0.0001 gramm less.
  13. Upsilon wont just replace Lambdas role because its more expensive i doubt you can easily fit 2 aces and Palpatine into a list with it.
  14. Boba works better, you only need 7 dmg to get rid of him instead of 11.
  15. CaineHoA

    FINAL SALVO!!!

    Not sure if we use the rule for our league (we are discussing at the moment if we instantly take over such changes in a running league). However I just played a game today were noone shot down a ship within time. So it was a 0:0. Just in case we rolled a Final Salvo. It went 4:5 against me. Playing a HWK suddenly has another disadvantage... I mean i pay 6 Points to get a 3 attack card and then it doesnt count for the Final Salvo... support ship nerfs were so needed :-(
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