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Darth Meanie

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  1. Darth Meanie

    Clinker Squadron

    Clinker 11: “White Noise” White. Avvery Vergescu, a novice pilot from Sullust, witnessed the brutality of the Empire first-hand during the Galactic Civil War in his childhood. Despite his inexperience as a warrior, he does not want to see the First Order become another oppressive authoritarian galactic power. A light sleeper, he uses noise-cancelling headphones and a white noise generator when possible, earning him his callsign and a paint job to match. Clinker 9: “Sidewinder” Sand and Armor Sand. Pasir Pantai is a Human from Soccoro. He was a speed-demon as a teen, and often raced swoops semi-professionally, eventually earning enough money to move off-planet. He dislikes oppressive governments and corporations, so he quickly signed up for the Resistance. Flying fast ships wasn’t a bad secondary benefit. Only 3 to go:
  2. Darth Meanie

    Clinker Squadron

    Clinker Squadron Based on the Mon Cal Cruiser Eventual Syzygy, Clinker Squadron has some of the last of the Resistance’s Incom-FreiTek T-85 X-Wings. Most were salvaged from spare parts after the loss of the factory in the Hosnian System, and given the rag-tag nature of the rebuilds, the pilots have been allowed to give each ship a personal livery all its own, resulting on one of the most colorful fighting units in the galaxy. This leads to the crew often being called the Pilots of Polychrome Squadron. Clinker 6: “Cinnamon Buns” Pink T-85. A female human from Alderaan, Lt. Grazik always seems to have something to prove and is known to “steal the shot,” acting on her own impulses and being a poor supporting wingman. She is not overly popular with her squadmates, but they have to grudgingly admit she’s still a pretty **** good pilot. Clinker 10: “Hookah” Purple. Gerritt Hayes is a Human male from Corulag. He always seems a bit sleepy and out of it, and says “bombad” a lot. On the other hand, he is slow to panic, cool on the stick, and the kind of wingman you want protecting your 6.
  3. Darth Meanie

    Ship Sizes

    Exactly. In 1969, "Mars is next."
  4. Darth Meanie

    The value of generics?

    ^This. Because either they would have made them cost effective, or they would finally come up with squad mechanics. And this is where a Squadron title might help. It could add that premium without needing to alter the base cost of the ship. Lastly, generics are best in Epic. So, someday they might be more useful.
  5. Darth Meanie

    Longest membership on a message board?

    I've been on SJGames GURPS site since 2005, so 14 years. I haven't been out there much since 2013. And half my life would put us almost at the Age Before The Internet, so there's that. . .
  6. Darth Meanie

    What is the point of double modifications on tie interceptors?

    IMHO, one decent option is to offer the old ships with (at a minimum) new livery. The TIE/ln could have easily come with Inferno Squadron markings, and some people (like me) would pick it up just for aesthetic reasons. I realize that does get a little tricky for the monochrome Empire, but even then, there are options. For example, I'd like to see the TIE Defender come with yellow prototype markings. I'll never have 0-0-0 because I'm not buying anything just for cardboard. Overall, as the game has already proven, the cardboard is disposable. If they want me to buy new stuff, the ship itself is critical.
  7. Darth Meanie

    If you were a pilot, Happy Friday?

    TIE Advanced Prototype. Add 2 Attack Dice if defender is from Second Edition.
  8. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    That's a cool notion. And only 1 Large base ship. Or pizza. Both Reinforce and Coordinate should have been left as Epic Only. Or, as you state, very gently sprinkled on low offense, command style ships.
  9. Darth Meanie

    Separatists or Republic

    I don't know. . . I think Rose is a probably a pretty fun mechanic to hang out with.
  10. A Lucrehulk-class battleship carries 1,500 Vultures. So I would go with that.
  11. Darth Meanie

    Separatists or Republic

    I have been playing bad guys since I started, so as I finally get into 2.0 I'm going good guys: Republic. I have always liked the sleek look of the N1, and I like the idea of flying Jedi more than drones. Now, when I play XWM, it seems I will be faced with the age-old Roman question: Empire or Republic??
  12. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    Huh. So, I'm surprised at this Unpopular Opinion seems pretty popular with 5 Likes. Spoiler Alert: I like listbuilding, and having it be irrelevant would actually make me unhappy. Moreover, if it is actually irrelevant, then the whole set up of the game is sorta BS. (A.) It tricks players into buying a game where they might think that upgrades and customization are a part of the game; to then have that be meaningless is deceptive advertising. (B.) It really dumbs the game down into just "peg and play," which now makes it an even more vanilla tactical game. (C.) It means that all of the balance issues are uselessly self-inflicted by the designers. Every pilot should simply exist as a QuickBuild card and be done. This would make balance easier, and be true to the real nature of the game. (D.) The notion of separating the pilot from the ship becomes an extremely bad idea, as it adds a meaningless level of complexity to a game where pre-play player design is unimportant.
  13. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    I miss-read that sentence, and actually repaired your quote before I saw this, so my bad. I still think it's a good analogy, however. Well, I don't propose to do anything about it, since I'm free to be creative on my own. As for the latter, I suppose it depends on what you do with "5 Ys are really good." Do you sit down with 5 Ys as a base and then create your own list? Or do you copy down his list verbatum and then run it as if it was your idea? The former is still fairly creative; the latter, meh. . . Well, we'll have to agree to disagree on that one. I have never liked how much this game has revolved around meta, math-analysis, and queries of "I want to fly Kylo. Somebody tell me how."
  14. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    Ah, well, I thought it was pretty good. "Cheat codes" allow a player to get to the resolution of the game faster, so yeah, I think they fall in the same category. @Dr Moneypants wasn't discussing efficiency, he was discussing creativity. And again, it doesn't seem to me that you've refuted his original statement that all of this "efficiency" isn't dumbing down the game's creativity.
  15. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    IMHO, everything you just said is an affirmation of @Dr Moneypants's position. The long road to finding optimal choices is what creativity is about, and if an unbalanced element remains undiscovered, then there is no imbalance. The game only becomes imbalanced once someone begins exploiting a bad mechanic. Solving the puzzle is what listbuilding and play should be about; finding that solution online is not gameplay, it's using "cheat codes." You're basically saying that more legitimate way to play Hide And Seek is calling out "I'm going to hide in the closet" because you'll be found anyways, you can save the rest of the players a bunch of time, and then FFG can decide if the closet is really the best place to hide.
  16. Darth Meanie

    Less is More

    Man, if you lose X-Wing to the dog. . .
  17. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    I am beginning to miss the discontent that was the end of 1.0. . .it was making players very creative in addressing the situation. I was doing some XWM organization this weekend, and ran into my printout of this: Players were putting a lot of energy into "reinventing" XWM, getting out of the grind, and make the game fun. With the advent of 2.0, it seems like everyone is willing to just let FFG fluff out factions without demanding more from the game than Standard. Because for me this happened after about 5 games. 2.0 has essentially killed any approach to the game but the fishbowl again--and I think this is the biggest danger that 2.0 faces. At some point, without play-style diversity (missions, scenarios, or well-supported Epic), the game will die because it never became anything different than what it was in August of 2012.
  18. Darth Meanie

    Less is More

    Nah. I just like complexity. . .and in X-Wing much of the complexity can be optional. IIRC, many have lauded 2.0 as allowing "naked pilots" to be viable, so you can easily discard any complexity that bothers you. IHMO, 2.0 is a much simpler game. There are far less options overall, and many of the them are faction-locked, and thus able to be ignored by players outside that faction. I liked ships that needed various upgrades to be viable and/or variable--that made list-building part of the game. For example, I really don't like that most of the Titles have been stapled to the chassis, preventing you from deciding x7 vs. /D for the Defender as one case-in-point, or from using the TIE Bomber as a shuttle.
  19. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    Hmm. Maybe it should be.
  20. Darth Meanie

    Less is More

    Way better than keeping up with errata, no? One tactic is to just not play that stuff. Like @PanchoX1 said, just know your stuff and let the other guy deal with his own complexity. Personally, I avoided Harpoon Missiles not because it was broken, but because I didn't want to deal with latent effects. I mean, isn't each "development of a core mechanic" a special rule? Each of which immediately doubles the current rules/game mechanics. I would argue the opposite. Faction-locked special abilities means you can ignore them (for the most part} if you don't play that faction.
  21. Darth Meanie

    X-wing or something about Friday

    Pshaaa, amateurs. I still haven't even played with the new edition, yet! EPIC^10000.
  22. Darth Meanie

    A fix for epic?

    I only play Epic. And I pretty much agree with 99% of what heychadwick said. But I would add a few additional comments. 1. The game is not cumbersome or slow, unless you are placing your expectations for Standard on it. Yes, it will take longer. But a lot of Heychadwick's suggestions can help speed up the game. But people need simply accept that a game of Epic is the night's entertainment. You won't get 3 games in during a single sitting. 2. Yeah, this is true. And this is why the official app really needs to print out viable play sheets. 3. With this, I have often found the reverse. TLT spam could be an issue, but imbalanced pilots and combos are one-hit-wonders that get lost in the larger pool of generic ships that can bring them down wolf-pack-style. Absolutely not this. Epic at its core should play exactly like X-Wing, which the exception of Huge ship mechanics. As was noted above, listbuilding should feature a different emphasis, but actual gameplay should be the same for S/M/L ships. Changing all the small ship mechanics will be confusing to players who might move back and forth between Epic and Standard, and having Epic be a significantly different variant will only further marginalize players who prefer Epic from the XWM community as a whole. It's already bad enough that we have to put up with this **** in every Epic thread: One main change I would like to see for Epic is a Huge Ship Damage Deck that applies to any Huge ship, rather than the 1.0 each-ship-needs-its-own system.
  23. Darth Meanie

    Unpopular Opinion Thread

    Don't get cocky, kid.
  24. Darth Meanie

    Picutorion Campaign Log

    The Battle for Picutorion A 1st Edition X-Wing Miniatures Epic Campaign Picutorion is a little known planet in the Kwymar Sector of the Outer Rim Territories. As the Empire grew in power, this world (and a handful of others in the Kwymar Sector) allied itself with the Alliance to Restore the Republic in defiance of the new Empire. Seeking to quell rebellion (and make an example of rebellious worlds), the Empire invaded the region in a series of battles that became known as the Kwymar Suppressions. Will Picutorion succumb to the Empire, or can a band of Rebels emerge to take the fight to the Empire? This campaign was created with 6 linear, “mandatory” encounters that recreate the struggles of the Picutorian rebels against the Imperial Navy. Both players may opt to engage in Diversion battles, which would be launched in the hopes that the player choosing the diversion will gain an advantage in future encounters. Since the campaign is set in the beginnings of the Galactic Civil War, it will emphasize ships from that era. On the other hand, if agreeable, players could also select from First Order and Resistance ships. Lastly, while this is mostly an Imperial vs. Rebels conflict, the aid of Scum and Villainy can be had--for the right price--on both sides. Play begins with a minimum of assets. Picutorion must defend itself with its Planetary Defense Force, and initially the Empire doesn’t think much of Picutorian’s pitiful little band. However, as the conflict lengthens, both sides begin to commit more to the fray. The first encounter lists the ships available to both sides. With the winnings of that battle, each player can begin to expand the options available for future engagements, while needing to balance this commitment with having the reserves to win the war. This will be described more below in Asset Points. Pilot Mortality For the duration of the campaign, if a pilot is destroyed in a mission, that pilot can no longer be used in list building by that player for any future missions (with some exceptions listed below). In this way, the campaign emphasizes the use of generics (who are always replaceable), and can sometimes make a battle loss a bit of a victory if the foe’s favorite hero is eliminated. On the other hand, to prevent generic-only “safety fleets,” each mission or diversion must contain one unique pilot or crew per 100 points of ships deployed. Still, use your aces with caution: If he dies, he no longer flies. If a player is required to field a unique pilot or crew but cannot due to heavy losses, he has 4 choices: (a.) he can hire a unique S&V pilot to stand in; (b.) he can recover a hero for 2 Asset Points; (c.) he can run the mission with less uniques than are required at the cost of 1 Asset Point off the total of Asset Points he would have won per AWOL hero (thus this means he is more likely to lose the scenario), or (d.) if he has no heroes at all, he forfeits the mission and the “winner” automatically gains ½ the possible awarded assets for the mission. The same “mortality” rule applies to all other unique Title, Astromech, and other Upgrade cards. If Han Solo is destroyed in the Millennium Falcon with Luke and C-3PO on board, all four Uniques are lost--including access to Luke Skywalker in an X-Wing--for the duration of the campaign. Pilots and Upgrades should also be considered an asset to be managed; players may need to plan for the long haul. Imperial Chassis Tiers Tier 1 (1 Asset Point each) Tier 2 (2 Asset Points each) Tier 3 (3 Asset points each) (TIE/ln) TAP TIE/fo TIE Bomber TIE Defender TIE/sf TIE Advanced TIE Aggressor TIE Silencer TIE Interceptor Alpha StarWing Upsilon Shuttle (Lambda Shuttle) TIE Striker TIE Phantom TIE Punisher VT-49 Decimator Firespray-31 TIE Reaper Rebel Chassis Tiers Tier 1 (1 Asset Point each) Tier 2 (2 Asset Points each) Tier 3 (3 Asset Point each) (Z-95) VCX-100 T-70 A-Wing YT-2400 ARC-170 (YT-1300) B-Wing Auzituck Gunship Attack Shuttle Phantom II K-Wing E-Wing X-Wing Scurrg HWK-290 Sabine’s TIE Resistance Bomber U-Wing Y-Wing Scum and Villainy Chassis Tiers Tier 1 (1 Asset Point each) Tier 2 (2 Asset Points each) Tier 3 (3 Asset Point each) Z-95 Kimogila Protectorate Starfighter Scyk StarViper JumpMaster 5000 Kihraxz Y-Wing Scurrg H-6 G1-A Starfighter Firespray-31 Aggressor Quadjumper Lancer-class HWK-290 YV-666 Assets Assets are the victory points awarded at the end of each mission, as described in each mission. They are the currency by which the player can influence future parts in the game. Be careful though: the player at the end of the campaign with the most Assets wins: spend too much, and you may lose it all! 1 point per Tier: Gain access to a new chassis type. Tier 1 chassis may be purchased at any time, and as many as desired. Tier 3 ships may be banned for flavor, or if players agree, may be purchased as per a Type 2 chassis. Only one Type 2 chassis type may be selected between main missions. Once a chassis is purchased, the player has unlimited access to that chassis for the rest of the campaign. 2 points: Recover a MIA/KIA hero. Death. It’s such an ephemeral thing in Star Wars. On the other hand, this may only be used once per campaign for a given character. On a second loss, the hero is permanently out of the campaign. 1 point: Well-Equipped. The player may spend 3 more points (per 100 points in the list, thus 3/6/9) on squadron building than is allowed for the scenario. Up to 2 Asset Points may be spent, maximum (allowing for an extra 6/12/18 points in a 100/200/300 point scenario). 1 point: Derelict Ship. The player replaces 3 asteroids with a single Huge ship. This ship does not move, and functions strictly as an obstacle. Up to 4 points can be spent, converting the battlefield in a ship graveyard! 2 points: **** the Torpedoes! The player replaces up to 3 asteroids with Static Minefields. He can spend 2 more points to change 3 more. Treat these as obstacles, with the same rules as asteroids except damage inflicted. If a ship’s template crosses a minefield, roll 3 dice and suffer all hits and criticals. If a ship’s base ends on a minefield, roll 5 dice and suffer all hits and criticals. Each minefield can be represented with a Cluster Mine token set. While all 3 pieces of the token must touch, the player does not have to lay them in a row! 1 point: Mine! Mine!! Mine!!! The player replaces 6 asteroids with static mines. For a second point, he can replace all 12 asteroids. For the mines, take a small ship base, and use it to replace 1 asteroid as an obstacle. Use the rules for Proximity Mine rules and damage (despite the smaller base size). The mine is not able to be targeted by ship attacks. 1 point: Asteroids Do Not Concern Me. After asteroid set up, the player may add 6 more asteroids. 1 point: This One Goes Here, That One Goes There. Got It? After asteroid set up, the player may remove and redeploy 2 of the asteroids. 1 point: Static Defenses: After asteroid set up, the player may add 3 minefields. 1 point: Battle in the Clouds. After asteroid set up, the player may change 2 of them to ion clouds. 1 point: Slug Fest. After asteroid set up, the player may add a Space Slug to one asteroid. 1 point: Benched. The player may deny the use of a Unique pilot in the next game. 1 point per Tier: Hired Help. The player gains access to a S&V pilot. If that pilot is Unique, the opposing player no longer has the option of taking that pilot. If, during a mission, both players arrive with the same Unique Scum pilot, they are both played that game. If one player’s copy of that pilot is killed, he loses control of that pilot and it now belongs to the other player. If both copies are killed, that pilot is lost for the rest of the campaign. If both copies survive, the player who won the scenario gains control of the pilot and the other player may no longer access him. 2 points: Plot Diversion: The player choses a mission not in the line of the campaign to foil the other player. Each player may purchase a Diversion one time only, and only 1 Diversion between each Episode. The Six Campaign Episodes The following six missions will be played by any players participating in the campaign. The form the core of the campaign’s story arc in the battle for Picutorion. In between each mission, each player may choose a single Diversion Mission. These Diversions are not mandatory, and in fact cost the player Asset Points to engage (see below). Thus, the campaign will be at minimum 6 engagements, and may consist of as many as 10 more engagements, if both players select a Diversion at every opportunity. Regardless of the outcome of an Episode, a player earns a minimum of 2 Asset Points. Episode I: Assault on Picutorion The Imperial have arrived to conquer Picutorion. In accordance with the Tarkin Doctrine, the Imperial want to cut off Picutorion’s ability to effectively communicate with the outside galaxy. To this end, they must destroy its communications network. The Picutorion Planetary Defense Force has mustered what ships they can to repel the attack. Episode II: Rebel Restock The Rebels make a daring raid with 3 GR-75s to steal supplies from the Imperials. Episode III: Blockade Run Having failed to completely quell Picutorion, the Imperial Navy has established a blockade of the planet to prevent further strengthening of the rebellion there. This blockade is slowly choking the Rebels ability to fight. . .they need more supplies. In a daring run, with a new secret weapon prototype, the Rebels attempt to bust the blockade and sent supplies to Picutorion. Episode IV: Scramble the Fighters! Imperial ambush! The Rebels are caught off guard while having a secret meeting on a remote space station. A VIP vital to the Picutorion resistance is present and must get away. Rebel fighters are scrambled to buy time as the VIP is rushed to an available shuttle for an escape to hyperspace. Episode V: The Rebellion Strikes Back The Rebels have finally decided to take the fight to the Empire. (If they are winning, they are emboldened. If they are losing, they are getting desperate.) Spies have located an Imperial refueling facility. If they can destroy Imperial resources, they can finally begin to gain some ground in repelling the Imperial incursions in the Kwymar Sector. Unfortunately, the facility is well-guarded. . . Episode VI: The Last of the Leaders The enemy is nearly defeated!! The player with the most Assets after Episode V and any Diversions launches an attack against the leaders of the opposition. A secret meeting in a remote sector of space has been discovered by the agents of the ascendant player, and an attack is launched in hopes of finishing the enemy once and for all. On the other hand, if the ambush is unsuccessful, it may only mean that defeat is inevitable. . . [Whoever with the most Asset points is the Attacker. Every leader killed is worth 2 Asset points to the Attacker, every leader that survives is worth 4 points to the underdog. If the margin is close, the loser might just become the winner!! Also, if the Defending player does not have enough unique pilots left, see the section on Pilot Mortality (above) for his options.] Diversion Missions These missions are completely optional. A player choosing a Diversion will spend Asset Points to “purchase” the Diversion, essentially choosing to divert resources in an attempt to gain the upper hand later in the campaign. A player may purchase a Diversion only once, but each Diversion is available to both players so a single Diversion may be played twice during the course of the campaign if the players seek the same advantages during the campaign. The player spending Assets to select the mission is the “Purchasing Player;” his opponent is the “Defending Player.” The Purchasing Player has Initiative for the Diversion Mission. At the end of each Campaign Mission, each player must announce whether they are selecting a Diversion, and if so, which Diversion they have chosen. The player who lost the Campaign Mission then selects the order in which the Diversions are played. (If the Campaign Mission was a tie, use a coin toss to determine Diversion Mission order.) Any results of a Diversion Mission are applied immediately, and thus may affect the choices and resources of the next Diversion (and the rest of the campaign). When all selected Diversion Missions have been played, the players then play the next Campaign Mission. Diversion (300 points): Factory Strike Purchasing player chooses a chassis the other player currently does not have access to. The defending player cannot spend more than 150 points of his list fielding the chosen chassis. If the Attacking player destroys all the ships of the chosen chassis, the defender loses access to that chassis for the rest of the campaign. If the Defending player wins, he gains access to that chassis for the rest of the campaign. The Attacking player may flee the board after destroying all pilots of the chosen chassis. Diversion (300 points): Unplanned Obsolescence Purchasing player chooses a chassis the other player currently has access to. The defending player builds a list that is 1/3 the targeted chassis, 1/3 generic and unmodified TIE/lns or Z-95s, and 1/3 player’s choice. When destroyed, the defender’s TIEs or Z-95s respawn from the corners of the battle field. On the turn after the ship is destroyed, before dials are set, the player replaces the ship within Range 1 of both table edges, and sets a dial for it. It may then move and attack as normal. (The Purchasing player’s TIE/lns or Z-95s do not respawn!) If the Attacking player destroys all the ships of the chosen chassis, the defender loses access to that chassis for the rest of the campaign. The Attacking player may flee the board after destroying all pilots of the chosen chassis. Diversion (300 points): Scientia and Sapientia The Purchasing player attacks an enemy Transport carrying technical parts and crew. The defending player must field as least one Transport Huge ship. If the Transport is destroyed, the Purchasing player selects 3 upgrades cards that cannot be used by the Defending player for the rest of the campaign. The Attacking player may flee the board when the Transport is destroyed. Diversion (300 points): Hostage Situation Purchasing player creates a S&V list. This list has not been hired by the purchasing player, so that player does not retain control of unique pilots at the end of the mission, but any unique pilots killed are lost in the campaign. The opposing player must field at least 5 unique crew and/or pilots. Any uniques destroyed are actually taken hostage by the pirates. The defending player may ransom each unique for 2 Asset points. If the ransom is not paid, the uniques are lost from the campaign. This battle is to the death. Diversion (300 points): Capital Gains Purchasing Player launches a strike against a Huge ship to destroy it. The Defending player must use one of the Titles for the Raider or CR-90. If the corvette is destroyed, the Title is lost for future missions (as per losing a Unique Pilot) and the Purchasing player earns 4 Asset Points. The Attacking player may flee the board after the Huge ship is destroyed. Diversion (200 points): Kessel Run Can you make the Kessel Run in 12 f/s? Even when someone is trying to kill you? Each player must use a large base ship as their racer; the rest of the list must be small base ships. Both players alternate playing 24 Asteroids!! Each player wagers any number of Asset points. Both large Racer ships deploy along the same short edge of the board; the small ships deploy along the long edges across from each other. Each player must race his large Racer ship from the starting edge to within R2 of the opposite edge, and then back off the starting edge. The first ship off the board has crossed the finish line, and that player wins Asset points equal to double their wager. The loser loses all of his wager. Either player can hire a large based S&V pilot to fly (at normal costs to hire S&V; if the pilot is not destroyed, that pilot can be added to the player’s list of available pilots). Diversion (200 points): The Extraction Purchasing player chooses 1 enemy Unique Crew to be the target. The Defending player must build a 200 point list that includes that crew upgrade. During play, the Purchasing player may attempt an extraction of the traitorous crew. To accomplish this: (A): the enemy ship carrying the crew to defect must be fully ionized; (B): the Purchasing player must bump the ship containing the chosen enemy unique crew while that ship is fully Ionized; (C): the bumping ship must contain an available Crew Upgrade slot, and (D): the Purchasing player’s ship with the defector must flee the board edge. If the Purchasing player is successful, that enemy crew card may be used in as a friendly crew future missions! The battle is to the death or until the Defecting Crew escapes the board edge. Diversion (200 points): A Hero Reborn Purchasing player chooses on of his KIA unique pilots to use in the scenario. If the unique pilot survives the Diversion, the purchasing player may again use that pilot (until destroyed again). The purchasing player also gains 4 Asset points. If the KIA pilot is destroyed again, defending player gains 3 Asset Points. player. The battle is to the death. Diversion (200 points): Munitions Dump Purchasing player attacks the foe’s supply dump. The Purchasing player deploys 6 asteroids on his side; the Defending Player deploys 6 Cargo Containers on his half of the board. For each Crate destroyed, purchasing player can deny 1 type of torpedo, missile, or bomb for the rest of the campaign. The Purchasing player can flee off table edge at any time to end the scenario. The Crates have Hull 4, 0 Agility, 0 Attack, and 0 Shields. A critical hit on a crate is considered 2 damage. When destroyed, the crates explode for 2d damage to any ship at Range 1. Diversion (100 points): Two Ships Enter, One Ship Leaves Each player must bring a 2 ship list, with both ships being unique pilots. Either player may flee the table edge when one of their ships is destroyed. Diversion (100 points): Never Tell Me the Odds The Purchasing player builds a 100 point squad. The Defending player builds a 110 point squad. If the purchasing player wins, he gains 4 Asset Points. The engagement is to the death. Diversion (100 points): All Squadrons Reporting In Each player choses 1 chassis. All ships in the list must be of the same type, and at least 1 unique Squad Leader is required. If the purchasing player wins, he gains 4 Asset points. If the opponent wins, he gains 2 Asset points. The engagement is to the death. Diversion (100 points): The Hit Besides purchasing the Diversion, the Purchasing player also purchases 100 points of S&V (which he may add to his roster after this encounter). He chooses 1 enemy Pilot to be the target. The Defending player must build a 100 point list that includes that pilot. An easy chance to remove an annoying target. The engagement is to the death. Diversion (100 points): Personnel Transfer Purchasing player chooses 1 enemy Unique Crew to be the target. The Defending player must build a 100 point list that includes that crew upgrade. An easy chance to remove an annoying target. The battle is to the death. Diversion (100 points): I Want That Ship, Not Excuses Purchasing player chooses 1 enemy Unique Ship Title to be the target. The Defending player must build a 100 point list that includes that chassis with the Title upgrade equipped. The battle is to the death. Diversion (100 points): Look, Sir. Droids! Purchasing player chooses 1 enemy Unique Astromech, Droid Crew, or Droid Pilot to be the target. The Defending player must build a 100 point list that includes that chassis with the Title upgrade equipped. The battle is to the death. Diversion (100 points): The Prototype If Tier 3 chassis have been banned, purchasing player chooses 1 ship from that roster and builds a 100 point list including 1 pilot in that ship. If the pilot in the chosen ship type survives the Diversion, that pilot may be used in the rest of the campaign (until killed). Alternatively, if Tier 3 chassis are not available in the campaign, no players may select this Diversion. Players may flee the board once the prototype is destroyed. Diversion (100 points): Not This Ship, Sister The Purchasing player chooses 1 ship with a Unique Pilot. If the unique pilot survives the Diversion, that pilot may be used in any mission the rest of the campaign (that is, the pilot is never struck from available pilots even if destroyed). This engagement is to the death. Diversion (100 points): The Force is With Me, and I Am One With The Force If the purchasing wins this encounter, he gains 1 Force Asset token. He may spend this Force Asset at any time in any future game to choose the result of a die roll. This engagement is to the death. Diversion (100 points): Cloak and Dagger If the purchasing player wins this encounter, he gains 1 Counterintelligence Asset token. He may spend this Counterintelligence Asset at any time to require his opponent to choose a different Diversion. Alternatively, that player may spend an additional 3 Asset Points to continue with the chosen Diversion. This battle is to the death. Diversion (100 points): I Can Fly Anything The purchasing player chooses any chassis he has access to, and assigns any Pilot Ability currently in the game (even across factions) to that chassis. The resulting pilot is PS 6 and has an EPT slot. If this homebrew pilot survives this encounter, the player may use this pilot in future missions. If killed, the Pilot is permanently lost. This Diversion costs 2 asset points to the purchasing player. Players may flee the board if the homebrew pilot is killed. Diversion (100 points): An Army of (Pilot Skill) One Each player must build a 100 point list with all PS 1 Pilots save for a single unique Squad Leader. The winner of the mission gains a number of Asset Points in proportion to the PS of the Squadron Leader. If the Squadron Leader was PS 1-3, the winner gains 4 Asset Points. If the Leader was PS 4-6, the winner gains 3 Asset Points. If the Leader was PS 7-9, the winner gains 2 Asset Points. If the winner was not the Purchasing player, deduct 2 points from these totals. This engagement is to the death.
  25. Darth Meanie

    Picutorion Campaign Log

    Rough night for the Imperials. It is likely I simply flew really bad, but it does make me want to test this scenario a little more for balance. I set up with most of the creates deep in Imperial territory. I wonder if I should have had a few out front, so that I could shoot Rebels while they were shooting sacrificial crates. Initially, it looks good. The Imperial get off alpha strikes with plasma torpedoes, and down 1 X-wing. Still looking good. The lines mesh, and Wedge dies from close-range attacks by the star-wings. Disaster. Reinforcements arrive. I really want to have them flank the Rebels, but I only have a narrow shelf of "Imperial side" to deploy them on. "Imperial Entanglements" ensue; I bump every ship that was supposed to K-turn and the Rebels fly right on by, scooping up another row of crates. Game over. Only one lonely Defender can get his **** sorted, while the Rebel fleet destroys all remaining Imperial supplies and makes the jump to hyperspace. KIA: Wedge and R2-D2. 12 Asset points for the Rebels, 2 Asset points for the Imperials. I'm pretty sure the Imps just lost control of the Sector.
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