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QorDaq

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  1. Like
    QorDaq got a reaction from player1994465 in Dead of Night To expensive!!!   
    I don't wish to "Pile on" here, so I'll approach this from my own perspective alone.
    For myself, $30-ish USD, does not seem unreasonable here--given the box design. My real quip, is that the economics of marketing in today's' amazingly prolific range of hobby games, makes it less attractive to make boxes/ containers that fit the contents. that is to say, that the push to establish a foot print on the shelves of retailers, in an effort to stand out and be noticed by consumers, is high. It may be, that this frequent disparity between the size of the box and the amount of content, can lead to feeling like we are purchasing as much air as game. And while I find it disappointing that FFG is particularly guilty of this, they are by no means operating in a vacuum--other publishers do this too.
    Now I don't have any working knowledge of what the difference might be, in price, were the packaging to be more size appropriate, but I'd be surprised if that does not play into the equation. I do, however, feel that this has a meaningful affect on our perceptions of value, as consumers.
    Far more of an impact on the MSRP, is the target profit margin on a given item. Before we can begin to know that, we'd need to first understand how much a given company budgets for the project, including; payroll, art, materials cost, warehousing, shipping, taxes, and so on, not to mention the impact of online retail, and whatever in-house decisions are made in terms of profit margin of a given product vs. the longevity of the core property when properly supported. Without those numbers, it's nearly impossible to know what FFG's expectations are for profit margin on an expansion like this (in the context of a $30 price point). I also think it's fair that FFG would expect to more than break even on their investment. 
    As consumers then, it's up to us to decide what the actual "Value" of a product is on a personal level. From the after market prices on hard to find items, it's clear that there are those out there that would likely pay much more than $30 bucks for the right expansion to a game. Anyone who has ever researched the cost of the Arkham Horror dice sets, will know this all too well.
    So in the end, I feel it's less about whether it's possible to argue that a company is being greedy, and becomes, with a little self-reflection, a matter of what we as gamers and consumers are willing to live with, how much enjoyment we expect to get out of a particular product, and then what we'd be willing to pay someone else to provide that for us.
    I'm quite certain, that were I to cobble together the components of the Dead of Night expansion, not to mention the time it would take to play-test and balance it, collect the art, and so on, then have it printed by a third party printing service, I would spend more, possibly a lot more, than $30 dollars for my trouble. So, in that light, Yeah, I'll drop the cash on DoT, because I want to flesh out my core game.
    For others, it may not be as cut and dry, and I respect that difference of opinion. These are hobby games, and as such, hardly worthy of getting stressed over things that are not, and will never be, within our control. Instead we make thoughtful decisions about what makes sense and what we can live with--choosing not to financially support a product that we don't believe in is absolutely a reasonable choice in my opinion.
     
  2. Like
    QorDaq got a reaction from AstroChicken in Dead of Night To expensive!!!   
    I don't wish to "Pile on" here, so I'll approach this from my own perspective alone.
    For myself, $30-ish USD, does not seem unreasonable here--given the box design. My real quip, is that the economics of marketing in today's' amazingly prolific range of hobby games, makes it less attractive to make boxes/ containers that fit the contents. that is to say, that the push to establish a foot print on the shelves of retailers, in an effort to stand out and be noticed by consumers, is high. It may be, that this frequent disparity between the size of the box and the amount of content, can lead to feeling like we are purchasing as much air as game. And while I find it disappointing that FFG is particularly guilty of this, they are by no means operating in a vacuum--other publishers do this too.
    Now I don't have any working knowledge of what the difference might be, in price, were the packaging to be more size appropriate, but I'd be surprised if that does not play into the equation. I do, however, feel that this has a meaningful affect on our perceptions of value, as consumers.
    Far more of an impact on the MSRP, is the target profit margin on a given item. Before we can begin to know that, we'd need to first understand how much a given company budgets for the project, including; payroll, art, materials cost, warehousing, shipping, taxes, and so on, not to mention the impact of online retail, and whatever in-house decisions are made in terms of profit margin of a given product vs. the longevity of the core property when properly supported. Without those numbers, it's nearly impossible to know what FFG's expectations are for profit margin on an expansion like this (in the context of a $30 price point). I also think it's fair that FFG would expect to more than break even on their investment. 
    As consumers then, it's up to us to decide what the actual "Value" of a product is on a personal level. From the after market prices on hard to find items, it's clear that there are those out there that would likely pay much more than $30 bucks for the right expansion to a game. Anyone who has ever researched the cost of the Arkham Horror dice sets, will know this all too well.
    So in the end, I feel it's less about whether it's possible to argue that a company is being greedy, and becomes, with a little self-reflection, a matter of what we as gamers and consumers are willing to live with, how much enjoyment we expect to get out of a particular product, and then what we'd be willing to pay someone else to provide that for us.
    I'm quite certain, that were I to cobble together the components of the Dead of Night expansion, not to mention the time it would take to play-test and balance it, collect the art, and so on, then have it printed by a third party printing service, I would spend more, possibly a lot more, than $30 dollars for my trouble. So, in that light, Yeah, I'll drop the cash on DoT, because I want to flesh out my core game.
    For others, it may not be as cut and dry, and I respect that difference of opinion. These are hobby games, and as such, hardly worthy of getting stressed over things that are not, and will never be, within our control. Instead we make thoughtful decisions about what makes sense and what we can live with--choosing not to financially support a product that we don't believe in is absolutely a reasonable choice in my opinion.
     
  3. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Soakman in Dead of Night To expensive!!!   
    ^Well said. Theoretically, there is an 'objective' value to every game, but ultimately it's each gamer's subjective value of that game/expansion that requires inspection. We'll never know the profit margins, but realistically we don't need to in order to come to terms with whether or not something is 'worth' purchasing.
  4. Like
    QorDaq got a reaction from Soakman in Dead of Night To expensive!!!   
    I don't wish to "Pile on" here, so I'll approach this from my own perspective alone.
    For myself, $30-ish USD, does not seem unreasonable here--given the box design. My real quip, is that the economics of marketing in today's' amazingly prolific range of hobby games, makes it less attractive to make boxes/ containers that fit the contents. that is to say, that the push to establish a foot print on the shelves of retailers, in an effort to stand out and be noticed by consumers, is high. It may be, that this frequent disparity between the size of the box and the amount of content, can lead to feeling like we are purchasing as much air as game. And while I find it disappointing that FFG is particularly guilty of this, they are by no means operating in a vacuum--other publishers do this too.
    Now I don't have any working knowledge of what the difference might be, in price, were the packaging to be more size appropriate, but I'd be surprised if that does not play into the equation. I do, however, feel that this has a meaningful affect on our perceptions of value, as consumers.
    Far more of an impact on the MSRP, is the target profit margin on a given item. Before we can begin to know that, we'd need to first understand how much a given company budgets for the project, including; payroll, art, materials cost, warehousing, shipping, taxes, and so on, not to mention the impact of online retail, and whatever in-house decisions are made in terms of profit margin of a given product vs. the longevity of the core property when properly supported. Without those numbers, it's nearly impossible to know what FFG's expectations are for profit margin on an expansion like this (in the context of a $30 price point). I also think it's fair that FFG would expect to more than break even on their investment. 
    As consumers then, it's up to us to decide what the actual "Value" of a product is on a personal level. From the after market prices on hard to find items, it's clear that there are those out there that would likely pay much more than $30 bucks for the right expansion to a game. Anyone who has ever researched the cost of the Arkham Horror dice sets, will know this all too well.
    So in the end, I feel it's less about whether it's possible to argue that a company is being greedy, and becomes, with a little self-reflection, a matter of what we as gamers and consumers are willing to live with, how much enjoyment we expect to get out of a particular product, and then what we'd be willing to pay someone else to provide that for us.
    I'm quite certain, that were I to cobble together the components of the Dead of Night expansion, not to mention the time it would take to play-test and balance it, collect the art, and so on, then have it printed by a third party printing service, I would spend more, possibly a lot more, than $30 dollars for my trouble. So, in that light, Yeah, I'll drop the cash on DoT, because I want to flesh out my core game.
    For others, it may not be as cut and dry, and I respect that difference of opinion. These are hobby games, and as such, hardly worthy of getting stressed over things that are not, and will never be, within our control. Instead we make thoughtful decisions about what makes sense and what we can live with--choosing not to financially support a product that we don't believe in is absolutely a reasonable choice in my opinion.
     
  5. Like
    QorDaq reacted to cheapmate in Expansion (Small-Box) #1: Dead of Night   
    It is the same art as on the Eldritch Horror Wanted Condition card, just cropped differently. This cropped version is actually better as it has more focus on the pursuit instead of The Red-Gloved Man behind the wheel

  6. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Duciris in Expansion (Small-Box) #1: Dead of Night   
    Starting card is "On the Lam" and choice of "Switchblade" or "Light Fingers"
    From the Live Stream:
    Roland Banks
    "Fight for the Truth - As part an attack action, you may add one to thr result of a number of dice equal to the number of clues in your neighborhood." Focus Limit: 2, Health:7, Sanity: 5; 2 Lore, 2 Influence, 3 Observation, 3 Strength, 3 Will Starting "0.38 Special" & choice of "Follow Up" or "Implacable"
    0.38 Special
    Item - Common Weapon "You get +2 Strength as part of an attack action.  If the monster you are attacking has a remnant icon, you get +3 Strength instead." Follow Up
    Talent - Innate "When you would gain a remnant, you may spawn a clue instead." Implacable
    Talent - Innate "When you would gain a remnant, you may regain 1 health and 1 sanity instead." ---
    There's a new condition card which I'm adding here not for the interesting bits of mechanic it has but rather the outstanding artwork on it.  Incredibly evocative.

  7. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Duciris in Expansion (Small-Box) #1: Dead of Night   
    https://www.fantasyflightgames.com/en/news/2019/6/11/dead-of-night/
    From the Live Stream:
    Double the size of ever encounter decks.
    4 New Investigators
    Rolands Banks The Fed (Guardian Seeker) "Skids" O'Toole The Ex-Convict Kate Winthrop The Scientist Diana Stanley The Redeemed Cultist 2 New Scenarios
    Shots in the Dark Silance of Tsathoggua New Monster Card Holder
     
  8. Like
    QorDaq reacted to drainsmith in Community Repository for DrainSmith's Dispensary of Genesys   
    As a community admin and moderator for Genesys on Facebook, Reddit, and Discord as well as being active on the FFG Forum, I see a lot of people asking for things that can be found easily on the other sites. Most people seem to only use one or maybe two of the community sites, so in an effort to help everyone find all the community content, I am making space available in my Dropbox. If you would like your content hosted and available in my Dispensary of Genesys send me an email (scott.zumwalt@gmail.com), message, comment, DM, PM, carrier pigeon (RFC1149), or however you like, with the file or files you want shared and what the name of your folder should be. They will stay right there until I die, Dropbox goes out of business, or you request they are removed. If you update your document, just send the new version to me and if you want the old one removed.
  9. Like
    QorDaq got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in Adventure modules for GMs with no time?   
    I am certainly a fan of converting a  module from one system to another, if it's a good scenario. But in my experience it's rarely any kind of time saver.
    On the other hand, one of the cool things about the GeneSys toolkit, in my opinion anyway, is that if a given group is relatively mature (as gamers), you can run an adventure fairly fast and loose. Set the scene, and let the Players guide the story to some degree. inevitably I find that the Players will inspire me in unexpected ways if I'm paying attention.
    But then, I've always preferred running sandbox games in almost any system. Taking 30 minutes the day before I run a game, and sort of sketching out loose beginning, middle, and end points, is often enough to get things going. I may know that I want A, B, and C to happen, but I'll allow the party to go where they want, and then I'll insert "A" in where it makes sense, same with "B" and "C". The random NPC's and situations the party encounters, will then inform the bigger story that evolves in my head for future sessions.
    I've had good success with that approach in the past, when I run out of time to prepare a deeper story. 
    So how does that apply to the OP? Well, given that you (Ceodryn), have experience GMing WHF and SW, I'd think that-that familiarity should help negotiate GeneSys on the mechanical side, which just leaves adventure hooks really. I saw a YouTube video with Chris Perkins on a panel discussion about adventure creation once, where he mentioned taking inspiration from real world current events, and then adapting them into his (D&D), game. I thought that was a fairly clever approach for doing initial story sketches.
    I don't know how useful any of that is within the context of finding solid pre-written adventures, but perhaps it offers you some ideas for how to let the game and story evolve organically? And thus, possibly relieve some of the stress of "Needing" a fully fleshed out adventure.
    The one thing I'd suggest though, is don't tell the players that- that's what you're doing. Let them fill in the missing pieces for themselves and feel clever for having solved your puzzle in their own way. And... Of course, take a ton of notes on what they do and with whom they end up interacting with--that'll help maintain continuity going forward.
    Success to you in finding a solution that makes sense for you and your group.
     
  10. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Watercolour Dragon in Nice one FFG   
    Good to see FFG's Genesys books doing really well on DriveThru in it's 100 hottest titles:
    Android Shadow of the Beanstalk is in top spot at number one
    Genesys at number 30
    and Realms of Terrinoth at number 41:
    https://www.drivethrurpg.com/top_100.php
    as of 00:26 BST 3 April '19
     
  11. Like
    QorDaq reacted to TheLonelySandPerson in Some facts about bioroids and clones   
    Shadow also mentions these clones:
    Desai (teacher)
    Tenma (pilot)
    Omoi (security)
    Molloy (restauranteur*)
    Nisei (psychic?)
    It's unclear if K8 police dogs, teacup giraffes, and so on are cloned or bred, if you want to count non-humans. My money is on "cloned", for what it's worth.
    In Worlds of Android, a rogue Tenma (of unspecified age) indicates that he doesn't know his own expected lifespan, but guesstimates 10 to 25 more years. No idea what a lack of, uh, manufacturer maintenance might do to that.
    *Worlds describes the Molloy series as proprietary to the Mother Molloy's Irish Pub chain.
  12. Thanks
    QorDaq reacted to Aazlain in Some facts about bioroids and clones   
    The core book did a decent enough job of packing as much information as it could in its limited page count, but I think it is a little light on information about bioroids and clones, two playable archetypes. 
    I have gathered below some information on bioroids for GMs and players who intend to play androids or clones.
    For the purpose of this guide, I'm sticking to 'Canon' information only (Games, RPG, Novels) as opposed to player created content.
    Feel free to contribute below. I'll update this first post with your input. Whenever possible, please cite your sources (such as novel or book title, page, chapter, card name).
    -----

    DID YOU KNOW?
    ON ANDROIDS IN GENERAL (Bioroids and Clones)
    Androids and the Law 
    Because they are manufactured synthetically, androids are classified as property, not people, so any violence inflicted on them is mere vandalism, not assault or murder. While completely organic, clones are classified as machines and accordingly have no rights. Androids can be impounded without a warrant if suspected of criminal activity, or inaction could lead to further damage to people or property. An officer can also seize a bioroid that appears tampered with, modified, or illegally obtained.
    ON BIOROIDS
    The Three Directives
    'All' bioroids are bound by the Three Directives*, rules which form the core of a bioroid's programming,  but in theory a bioroid could have any number of core directives. Even zero. The Directives are inspired by Isaac Asimov's "Three Laws of Robotics".
    The First Directive forbids a bioroid from harming, or through inaction allowing harm to befall, a human being. The Second Directive requires a bioroid to complete its primary function above all other considerations, save the First Directive. The Third Directive requires a bioroid to preserve its ability to function and report frequently to Haas-Bioroid for repairs and updates. * If you play a bioroid, you need to decide whether they are still beholden to their directives.
    Regular Maintenance
    The Third Directive states that the bioroid must report to Haas-Bioroid for regular maintenance (weekly) when doing so would not violate the First or Second Directives. Often this is a simple visit to the nearest HB showroom, but in the case of the more sophisticated or prototype models, this can entail a journey up the Beanstalk to HB’s R&D facility on Luna.
    This maintenance might take the form of a simple shutdown and repair, tightening loose joints, replacing worn seals or synthskin, refitting errant wiring, and recharging internal batteries. The entire process can take less than an hour, thereby minimizing the unit’s downtime. Sometimes the process is more involved; replacing a damaged limb or overhauling a power source can take days to complete. Thankfully, due to a bioroid’s extreme durability, these occasions are rare.
    Weekly maintenance is important not only for the bioroid’s physical shell but for its quantum brain as well. Shutdown can help break any algorithmic recursions or other infinite loops that may be draining a bioroid’s processing power. [Worlds of Android - Page 40]
    Artificial Appearance
    Although many bioroid models possess a covering of synthetic skin, common features like silver eyes and cabling at joints mean no one would ever confuse a bioroid for an actual person. Many humans are discomfited by the semblance of humanity presented by synthskin bioroids, so Haas-Bioroid takes great pains to mitigate this so-called “uncanny valley” effect. 
    Aim for the chest!
    Some bioroid models have their brains located into their torso rather than their head for better protection. (Confirmed for Drake and Frank models)
    Bioroid compensation
    Bioroid units contracted to corps by Haas-Bioroid are given a weekly credit allowance from HB. Bioroids choose how to spend it. They spend their credits in places so they can socialize with humans and learn from those encounters.
    Falling off the grid
    Haas-Bioroid has a policy of destroying any unit that has fallen off their grid for any significant time. They don’t want to chance letting any kind of software corruption loose in their facilities.
    Most bioroids have a locator beacon installed that can be activated to track down “misplaced units”. [Night on the town adventure - Part 2 - On the Run]
    Known models and primary Functions
    Adam (Industrial Labor) Alix (Investors and financiers) Adonis and Eve (Pleasure) Ash (Office productivity)  Ben (Multipurpose executive assistant) Drake (Detective) Elsa (?) Florence (Nurse) Floyd (Detective) Frank (Heavy labor. Limited social interaction capabilities) James (Clerical unit) Janice Line (Corporate and office work) Brad (Finance) Sally (Overseer) Grey (Customer Service) Kevin and Lisa (Pleasure) Mc-Dreamy (Medical)  Rex (Search and Rescue) Seth (Barista) Steiger (Miner) Welby (Medical)  
    ON CLONES
    Fingerprints
    Clones have unique (albeit similar) fingerprints, so clones of the same line have fingerprints similar enough to be distinctive. Even a Henry who has never been fingerprinted will likely be identified as a Henry based on his fingerprints alone.
    Identifying a clone
    Clones are identified by a distinctive tattoo on the back of their necks coupled with a sub-dermal ID chip. Each code is unique to the individual, so law enforcement organizations use the tags to identify ownership.
    Housing your clone
    If your home is large enough to have a spare bedroom—even a small one—then this is often the best option. In cases were sufficient living space is not available, the best option is to house a clone at either a nearby clonetel or to ship it off to an austere but large clone barrack.
    Reproduction
    Clones are sterile and can't reproduce. [Exodus - Chapter 5]
    End of Lifespan
    Clones who have exceeded their product lifespan are taken to a Jinteki recycling facility for 'recycling'. Damaged or defective clones can also be disposed in this fashion.
    Clone models and primary functions
    Desai (Teacher) Florence (Caretaker and personal nurse) Henry (Labor) Molloy (Restaurateur*) Nisei (?) Omoi (Security) Steven (Caretaker and personal nurse) Tenma (Pilot) * Proprietary to the Mother Molloy's Irish Pub chain.
     
    ----
    Below are some topics for which need more information or confirmation. Feel free to contribute.
    Clone and Bioroid Lifespans?
    Clones (and Bioroids?) are designed with a reduced lifespan, at the end of which, they are 'retired'. How long is this lifespan? Would a clone naturally cease to function at the end of that lifespan or does it need to be 'forcibly retired' by Jinteki?
    Bioroid naming convention.
    Bioroids have a name that starts with their model name, followed by a serial number (?) Are there any reference about this naming convention? Number of digits? Is it just random numbers and letters?
    Some examples: Alix 75H2LW, Ash 4L1KD5PS, Elsa 5K71R, Floyd 2X3A7C’s, Drake 3GI2RC, Frank 5DE7CE, James AK49I27, Welby 4AR9KA.
     
     
  13. Thanks
    QorDaq reacted to pocket-contents in Shadow of the Beanstalk one-sheet adventure: 'The Clone Flu'   
    Hi all,
    I wrote up a one-sheet adventure for Shadow of the Beanstalk. It's called 'The Clone Flu'.
    Plot hook: Jinteki’s clones are dying to a never-before-seen strain of influenza. They believe they know who’s behind the outbreak, but they need some freelancers to prove it.
    Could be a fun intro adventure.
    Enjoy,
  14. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Cantriped in Combat/Skill checks in low/microgravity   
    'Zero Gravity' is treated as Difficult Terrain, which significantly hinders movement. 'In/Decreased Gravity' affect Athletics, Brawl, Coordination, and Melee checks. That's basically it per RAW, and is already pretty severe IMO. Unusual gravity can make it very difficult to engage close-combat.
    So I wouldn't go so far as to penalize ranged combat too; because it just isn't cinematic to make combat in a given environment a no-win-situation. Most Ranged weapons in SotB are "Smart", and use caseless ammunition. That they're usually smart-guns is a good enough justification (IMO) for these futuristic weapons to work just as well in any gravity.
    Penetrating the hull would still be a very real danger (especially in an unarmored Passenger Dropship)... As such, security personnel on a spacecraft would be more likely to use Synap Pistols or Masers over any slugthrower or mass driver.
  15. Thanks
    QorDaq reacted to pocket-contents in Paranormal/mystery one-shot: 'DEATH at Gardner House!'   
    Hi all,
    I recently finished making another mystery one-shot.
    Plot hook: May 14th, 1910: During the passage of Halley’s Comet, an informal society of “gifted” individuals investigates the murder of a reclusive millionaire.
    I believe I levelled up my InDesign skills making the PDF to look like a period-appropriate newspaper. For best results, print in 'tabloid' size and fold horizontally. Each 'node' of the adventure takes up one half of a page, so the folding works well.
    Enjoy,
  16. Like
    QorDaq reacted to c__beck in GenCon Adventure Now Available!   
    Both the GenCon adventure and it's sequel are now available as one module!
    Check it out.
  17. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Zsig in Icebreaker Limits Confusion   
    At first I thought I understood the rules, but the more I read it, the more confused I get. I can't seem to get what's the intended way to play with the limits on how many programs a runner can have active at any given time (or, for that matter, what "active" means).
    I gathered all sources I could find on the book regarding the subject:
    Equipment
    From pages 98 to 99 (and 106), the computers entries each describe how many ice/icebreakers the device can have "active" at once.
    PAD: can have 1 icebreaker and 1 ice active at once; Spinal Modem: can have 2 icebreakers and 1 ice active at once; Portable Rig: can have 2 icebreakers and 2 ice active at once; Big Rig: can have 4 icebreakers and 6 ice active at once. All descriptions also include a "(for the purposes of network encounters)". Whatever that means (more on that later).
    Finally, the Custom Rig talent (page 44) allows the device to store (own) one extra program (or, number of programs the device can own is increased by one).
    Curiously, on the starting gear for the runner career (page 39), it includes an option to have a pad with 2 icebreakers, which shouldn't be possible since the PAD can only hold 1 icebreaker, so, maybe they are assuming your character has the Custom Rig talent, or...
    There's something missing...
     
    The Sidebar
    Back at page 99, there's a sidebar with the title "What Can a PAD Hold", and it states that (as I understand it) the limitations above are only valid while the runner is making a run (a network encounter). Outside of those encounters, any device can hold as many programs as their owners wish (credits not being a problem).
    But then, comes the final culprit...
     
    Network Encounter Rules
    On page 132, there's a maneuver named Activate Program, and there it is stated that if a runner activates an icebreaker, all other icebreakers automatically deactivate. Also, it says a runner may only have one icebreaker "active" at a time. (The Codeslinger talent, page 48, allows 2 icebreakers active at once).
    Which contradicts the whole thing!
    Unless the term "active" is being used for two distinct purposes and are not to be treated as the same thing, basicly I have the following interpretation.
     
    Current Interpretation
    Each device can host as many programs as you wish, but when an encounter starts, the runner gets to choose which programs he/she is bringing to the run, limited by the device's storage space (I think of this as a warrior readying to go out on a journey who owns several weapons but can only bring so many on his body, leaving all other weapons back at home).
    While on the run, from those programs brought in, the runner can actively be "wielding" a single icebreaker (I think of this as a warrior in combat with several weapons stored on him, but that can only wield a single weapon). The codeslinger talent effectively works as a "dual wielding" (as in, you can wield one weapon in each hand in combat).
     
    If this interpretation is not correct (maybe because the term "active" on both the equipment descriptions and the activate program maneuver), then the rules get a bit wonky and everything falls apart as one section will contradict another.
     
    Anyway, I just wanted to throw this at the community and see what everyone thinks are the rules as intended.
    BTW, I sent the question to FFG and still haven't got an answer.
     
  18. Like
    QorDaq reacted to drainsmith in Character Folios   
    I built the GenCon pre-gen characters into character folios in the style of the SWRPG starter sets.
    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/x6fxdpfdqwomhdp/AACJqUun185Yplls-flxxhuna?dl=0
  19. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Deadborder in Fallout Genesys   
    This is a little pet project of mine that I've been belting away at on and off for the last six or so months. It started as an expansion of the excellent Fallout Genesys theme by GM Phil, but quickly grew to something much, much bigger. While I did build from the core of Phil's work, I have considerably expanded on it in a number of ways. The result was that I wound up splitting it into three different files.
    Fallout Genesys
    The "core" file which should be everything you need to play. This covers the following areas:
    World Background (As a guide to newcomers to the series) Character Creation New Rules (Radiation, Power Armour and Chems) Basic equipment, including weapons, armour, chems and more. This is intended to be a stand-alone file; all you need to play is this and the Genesys core rulebook. The other two files are optional but can be used to give your game more options and flavour.
     
    Fallout Genesys Armoury
    The first "spin off" file, this one is an attempt to create a reasonably definitive collection of equipment from across the Fallout universe (without cluttering up the main file too much). It includes:
    Weapons Armour Power Armour Weapon and other Equipment Modification This file is still a work in progress. While it is largely complete, there are still a few items that I haven't yet written up (largely because I haven't figured values for them or haven't yet figured the mechanics).
     
    Fallout Genesys Factions
    The third file, this one provides summaries of a number of factions within the Fallout world as a tool for both GMs and players. For each faction it includes:
    A brief history and background of that faction Character creation for that faction, including new character options where applicable New equipment where applicable So far this file is very incomplete. In future I plan to add a few sample NPCs/Adversaries for each faction.
    As said, this is very much a work in progress. I appreciate any feedback and constructive criticism.
  20. Like
    QorDaq reacted to SavageBob in Some Weapon Attachments for Modern Settings (Feedback Welcome!)   
    My setting is essentially what you describe, just advanced up a decade. Not everything will be Lovecraftian, but it's basically The X-Files in the '30s. I'm happy to share other things I come up with as I develop them.
  21. Like
    QorDaq got a reaction from SavageBob in Some Weapon Attachments for Modern Settings (Feedback Welcome!)   
    You have some nice ideas here. My own home-brewed setting (still evolving in it's hard-boiled noir meets light Lovcraftian mystery), has a base setting of 1920's, Gangland Chicago. I'll definitely be taking a closer look at these. Thank you.
  22. Like
    QorDaq reacted to SavageBob in Some Weapon Attachments for Modern Settings (Feedback Welcome!)   
    I'm working on a 1930s noir-detective setting, so I've been doing some research on the kinds of weapons available at that time. I've come across several weapon customizations that I think would make fun weapon attachments, but I'd love feedback on their game effects, required hard points, etc. I still haven't put price tags on these things yet, but that will come.
    Brass Catcher
    Gun enthusiasts sometimes attach a simple bag or receptacle to the ejection port of a firearm to collect spent casings. At the shooting range, this practice speeds cleanup and allows casings to be refilled. However, at a crime scene, using a brass catcher makes the work of forensic ballistics analysis harder by keeping the crime scene clear of what would otherwise be evidence that could identify the weapon that committed a crime.
    Use With: This attachment can be used with any ranged weapon that expels spent casings (most pistols, rifles, shotguns, submachine guns, and machine guns).
    Modifiers: When your character uses a weapon fitted with a brass catcher in a scene, other characters add Setback Setback to Perception and Knowledge (Science) checks made to both locate and analyze ballistic evidence related to the use of the weapon during that scene.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [Essentially, same game effects as a silencer, but applies after the fact.]
     
    Elegant Customization
    In some circles, a handgun inlaid with pearl, ivory, or other precious materials can turn heads, and a rifle with a stock made from polished wood can leave an impression.
    Use With: This attachment is available for any weapon.
    Modifiers: Your character adds Boost to all Charm, Deception, Leadership, and Negotiation checks they make when the weapon is visible to the target. This bonus only applies in situations where having the weapon visible would be socially acceptable (e.g., on a hunt, at a card game with mobsters, at a shooting range). Otherwise, flaunting the weapon has the same negative effect on social interactions as it would without the elegant customization.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [Inspiration here from the various diplomat's robes and so on in Star Wars. Would it be better if it added an auto-success or auto-advantage to the social check?]
     
    Extended Magazine
    In a firefight, the last thing a gunman wants is to run out of ammo. Extended magazines provide more bullets but also add to overall bulk. These magazines come in different shapes and sizes depending on the weapon they attach to, from a longer magazine for a pistol or machine gun, to a large drum for a Tommy gun. 
    Use With: This attachment is available for pistols, submachine guns, machine guns, and rifles.
    Modifiers: While your character is using this weapon, the GM must spend at least Despair Despair to cause it to run out of ammunition. The attachment also increases the weapon's Encumbrance by 1. Anyone searching your character adds 1 boost to Perception checks they make to find a weapon with this attachment.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [Essentially an extra clip that is always engaged with your weapon, hence the double Despair requirement.]
     
    Forearm Grip
    By adding a handgrip under the barrel of a rifle, the user can better handle the weapon in tight quarters.
    Use With: Any rifle weapon can have a forearm grip.
    Modifiers: Decreases the additional difficulty added to Ranged (Heavy) checks at engaged range with the weapon from (PP) to (P).
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [This is a direct port from Star Wars. Can other guns have forearm grips added in this way?]
     
    Lanyard
    Dropping a weapon can spell disaster in a combat situation. Fortunately, by attaching a cord to the weapon and to the user's belt or neck, the wearer can quickly retrieve a dropped weapon and continue the fight.
    Use With: You can use this attachment with any weapon.
    Modifiers: During your character's turn, you may retrieve a dropped weapon as an incidental as long as you are engaged with it.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [Adaptation of the magnetic weapon tether in Star Wars.]
     
    Pintle Mount
    When gunplay and high-speed chases come together, mounting a large weapon directly onto a vehicle offers more stability. Police departments often use such mounts to attach guns to motorcycle sidecars, for instance.
    Use With: A pintle mount may be used with any weapon that is fired with the Ranged (Heavy) or Gunnery skill.
    Modifiers: A weapon on a pintle mount reduces its Cumbersome or Unwieldy rating by 3, to a minimum of 0. It reduces its encumbrance by 4, to a minimum of 0. The weapon may not be moved except to pivot on its pintle after it has been attached. When firing a pintle-mounted weapon from a moving vehicle, your character suffers no penalties due to the vehicle's speed, but the GM may still impose Setbacks for environmental factors, such as poor road conditions. Removing a weapon from a pintle mount requires two Preparation maneuvers.
    Hard Points Required: 2.
    [Mechanically, this is a tripod mount that attaches the weapon to a vehicle instead of a separate tripod.]
     
    Pistol Grip
    This modification changes the way a gun is held to better match smaller arms, such as pistols and revolvers. When applied to shotguns and other large weapons, this modification allows the gun to be fired one handed.
    Use With: Any Ranged (Heavy) weapon that does not have the Cumbersome quality.
    Modifiers: Your character must now use the Ranged (Light) skill to fire the weapon instead of Ranged (Heavy). However, they must add Setback to combat checks with this weapon, and the weapon's range is reduced to medium if it was longer before.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [Direct port from Star Wars.]
     
    Shoulder Stock
    Attaching a stock to the rear of a handgun allows the firer to brace the weapon against a shoulder and stabilizes the weapon. This modification makes the weapon more accurate, but also bulkier and harder to carry.
    Modifiers: Grants the weapon the Accurate 1 quality, or increases the Accurate quality by 1. The weapon's Encumbrance goes up by 1, as well. A shoulder stock removes any bonuses to hide the weapon and adds Boost to Perception checks to spot it instead.
    Use With: This attachment can be used with pistols, revolvers, and submachine guns.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
     
    Sleeve Holster
    This mechanism lets the user hide a small weapon up their sleeve at the end of a spring-loaded bar. By activating a lever at the elbow, the user sends the weapon forward and into their hand.
    Use With: This attachment can be used with any weapon of Encumbrance 1 or less except for weapons that must be thrown.
    Modifiers: Your character may ready the weapon as an incidental rather than a maneuver. However, anyone searching you adds Boost to their Perception check to find the weapon while this attachment is in use.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [Think Taxi Driver, although they had these in the Old West, as well.]
     
    Sound Suppressor
    Sound suppressors, also known as silencers, make firearms more difficult to detect when fired. However, they slow the speed of the bullets and reduce the damage dealt.
    Use With: Any weapon that fires bullets can use a sound suppressor.
    Modifiers: When you fire your weapon, other character add Setback Setback to Perception and Vigilance checks to locate you based on the sound of your weapon.
    Hard Points Required: 1.
    [Direct port from Star Wars.]
  23. Like
    QorDaq reacted to Watercolour Dragon in Digital Versions - check for updates!   
    Just got the digital version of the CRB from Drive Thru RPG (so now have this and ROT as digital and printed copies)
     
    A useful tip if you have the digital copies is to check for updates every so often - I found out both have updates so I now have the latest copies, something I'd missed until now so thought I'd share the info.
     
    Guessing it's a few corrections such as typos.
     
    If anyone finds there's been an update after today maybe share that here so people know- thanks.
  24. Like
    QorDaq reacted to CaptainRaspberry in Best way to learn the differences quickly?   
    There's no substitute for reading the rules, certainly. But if you're already familiar with the Star Wars RPG, you already know most of it. There's no change to what the symbols mean, and the dice even have the same distribution. You'll know the hardest parts of the system, including using advantages, threats, triumphs, and despairs. Instead, here's a list of areas where you can focus on the few key differences:
    You'll need to learn how Story Points are different from Destiny Points. Read up on how archetypes and careers work. Archetypes aren't necessarily the same as species, and while careers are similar to how they are in Star Wars, there are a few important changes. You'll need to familiarize yourself with how players buy talents, i.e., build a talent pyramid. Most of the skills are the same or similar, but there are a few handy sidebars in the book that describe why some skills might get simplified and grouped together while others are split up into new skills. ("Computers" becoming "Hacking" and "Sysops" is one example.) One of the major changes I actually really like and have incorporated into my Star Wars games is the beefed-up social encounter rules. You'll want to read those. And of course, if your planned setting uses magic, you'll want to read that part and decide how you want magic to work in your game. Otherwise, you're pretty much ready to go.
  25. Like
    QorDaq reacted to SavageBob in Best way to learn the differences quickly?   
    This thread has a very good list of all the changes and might help you immensely: 
    Focus specifically on Farnir's post and then my reply to it. That's the laundry list of differences from the Star Wars system.
    If you need an even more TL;DR list of differences so that you can just jump right in, I'd say the only real thing to get your head around is the Talent Pyramid, as that has replaced Specializations in Star Wars. The idea is that you take Talents à la carte instead of as part of a tree. You have to progress down the pyramid in tiers, starting with Tier 1 [5 XP] and on to Tier 5 [25 XP]. You can only take a Talent in a new tier if you have at least one more Talent of the previous level (e.g., Tier 2 only after you've gotten two Tier 1's; Tier 3 only after you've gotten two Tier 2's, etc.].
    Everything else, what you know about Star Wars should serve you quite well.
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