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PhilMetalJacket

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  1. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from mwknowles in Stormtrooper game ideas   
    The depiction of stormtroopers in the movies was always a failing in the same way adversary soldiers are in a lot of adventure movies. Just a crowd of guys in uniforms running with guns, shooting from the hip, not moving in any organized way. Still, the fiction characterizes Stormtroopers as basically being marines, so I always write them as being skilled professional soldiers, and I assume that they are, in fact, organized the way you would expect soldiers or marines are. Squad and fireteam members should have roles to play, even among stormtroopers. Marksmen, support gunners, medics, etc.
     
    I think it could be really interesting to takes some cues from Black Hawk Down, in scenarios and in characterization. Your team, since you say they're not the elite team of super-badass commandos, could be deployed as a element in a much larger operation. Maybe something in the operation goes wrong and the team's mission of securing the perimeter becomes some thing else, like chasing down an escaping target or rescuing the crew of a downed transport.
     
    Also, your team of tough professional soldiers could interact with, or at least see in action, a group of near-superhuman elite commandos. Say, your team is taking on some kind of armored vehicle. It's tough but they manage to bring it down with a little luck and a lot of firepower. Suddenly, a second one shows up. It looks bad, but one of the elite guys jumps in, plants a charge on the the enemy tank and boom. Just another day for one of those guys.
     
    I guess the other thing to think about in an Imperial military setting, is taking advantage of the overwhelming fire support offered by the Imperial Navy. Test communication skills or cool by accurately calling in fire missions or air strikes, or use beacons or target designators.
  2. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from GreyMatter in Reading recommendations for a noir-themed EotE campaign   
    It's not Star Wars, but the first novel in the Expanse series, Leviathan Wakes by James S.A. Corey, might serve you well. One of the main characters is a detective, working on an asteroid, investigating a missing-persons case amidst race tensions and interplanetary war. It's also a very fun read.
  3. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Josep Maria in Humorous Item Qualities   
    I sometimes like to include superficial quirks to items which can be amusing, but very occasionally useful. People tend to get pretty attached to their weird items. And sometimes you can work it into the game that, say, a ship flies past and the party recognizes the distinctive rattling sound of its engines.
     
    How about this:
     
    I Don't Even Hear It Anymore:
    Item emits a strange and distinctive noise when used, but with no apparent ill effects. "Your blaster makes a sort of quacking sound when fired. It's weird, and it draws some curious looks, but it seems to work just fine."
     
    It's a [species name] Thing:
    Item is designed to appeal to the aesthetic or cultural sensitivities of a specific species, at the cost of offending or disturbing most other species. "Taking a closer look, you notice the blaster's buttstock appears to be carved in the shape of a female wookiee doing... something. It's both distracting and highly disturbing."
     
    Permanent Marker:
    Item was tastelessly or incriminatingly decorated by the previous owner, and it is impossible to remove without destroying the item. "You wish you could remove the 'Hello Wompy' sticker the last owner applied to the fighter's canopy, but it's permanently fused to the transparisteel."
  4. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from GM Stark in Humorous Item Qualities   
    I sometimes like to include superficial quirks to items which can be amusing, but very occasionally useful. People tend to get pretty attached to their weird items. And sometimes you can work it into the game that, say, a ship flies past and the party recognizes the distinctive rattling sound of its engines.
     
    How about this:
     
    I Don't Even Hear It Anymore:
    Item emits a strange and distinctive noise when used, but with no apparent ill effects. "Your blaster makes a sort of quacking sound when fired. It's weird, and it draws some curious looks, but it seems to work just fine."
     
    It's a [species name] Thing:
    Item is designed to appeal to the aesthetic or cultural sensitivities of a specific species, at the cost of offending or disturbing most other species. "Taking a closer look, you notice the blaster's buttstock appears to be carved in the shape of a female wookiee doing... something. It's both distracting and highly disturbing."
     
    Permanent Marker:
    Item was tastelessly or incriminatingly decorated by the previous owner, and it is impossible to remove without destroying the item. "You wish you could remove the 'Hello Wompy' sticker the last owner applied to the fighter's canopy, but it's permanently fused to the transparisteel."
  5. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Metsys509 in Humorous Item Qualities   
    I sometimes like to include superficial quirks to items which can be amusing, but very occasionally useful. People tend to get pretty attached to their weird items. And sometimes you can work it into the game that, say, a ship flies past and the party recognizes the distinctive rattling sound of its engines.
     
    How about this:
     
    I Don't Even Hear It Anymore:
    Item emits a strange and distinctive noise when used, but with no apparent ill effects. "Your blaster makes a sort of quacking sound when fired. It's weird, and it draws some curious looks, but it seems to work just fine."
     
    It's a [species name] Thing:
    Item is designed to appeal to the aesthetic or cultural sensitivities of a specific species, at the cost of offending or disturbing most other species. "Taking a closer look, you notice the blaster's buttstock appears to be carved in the shape of a female wookiee doing... something. It's both distracting and highly disturbing."
     
    Permanent Marker:
    Item was tastelessly or incriminatingly decorated by the previous owner, and it is impossible to remove without destroying the item. "You wish you could remove the 'Hello Wompy' sticker the last owner applied to the fighter's canopy, but it's permanently fused to the transparisteel."
  6. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Metsys509 in Finally played the one trick I've been waiting to for so long   
    So, tonight, I started a new game of Edge of the Empire with all first-time players. I'd managed to secure 3 RPG-experienced players a while ago with a total novice to RPGs as a 4th. The plan, the three experienced guys formed the core of the crew. They arrive at a space station run by a minor Hutt crime lord, so that they can recruit a new crewmember. They take a table at a dive bar to wait for their contact, a Rodian lawyer who found this new guy. 
     
    Here's the part I've been waiting to use: The lawyer slides a datapad in front of the new guy, a surprisingly bloodthirsty Gank assassin as it happens, and explains that it's his contract. To teach him rolling tests, I got this guy to test Education to see if he could find any clauses or things that would be bad for him. He failed, so as far as he knew, there was nothing hidden in the dense legalese of the document. He signed. I then, as the lawyer, congratulated him for taking on the post of Captain for this crew's ship, The Perfect Patsy. I went on to explain that, as Captain, he would be legally responsible and accountable for all the activities of the ship and its crew. The experienced guys were in on it, but the new guy was as surprised as I hoped. I dropped enough clues about the contract that he knew something was up, but not that he'd be captain. And a scapegoat. He said, "I'm going to insist that you guys call me 'Captain.'" I was ready for this, though. "Actually, it says in the contract that they don't. Very specifically."
     
    After that, I basically repurposed a few encounters from the Beginner Game for combat. The new guy proved to be a vengeful, trophy-taking murder machine with a chip on his shoulder about being tricked. The rest was basically a breeze. A hilarious game of clumsy thugs and very gullible Gamorreans. Also, the party has now captured a master bounty hunter and his useless apprentice and is preparing to question them. The Gank assassin is really looking forward to this.
     
    And these guys are all hooked, now.
  7. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Jaspor in Finally played the one trick I've been waiting to for so long   
    So, tonight, I started a new game of Edge of the Empire with all first-time players. I'd managed to secure 3 RPG-experienced players a while ago with a total novice to RPGs as a 4th. The plan, the three experienced guys formed the core of the crew. They arrive at a space station run by a minor Hutt crime lord, so that they can recruit a new crewmember. They take a table at a dive bar to wait for their contact, a Rodian lawyer who found this new guy. 
     
    Here's the part I've been waiting to use: The lawyer slides a datapad in front of the new guy, a surprisingly bloodthirsty Gank assassin as it happens, and explains that it's his contract. To teach him rolling tests, I got this guy to test Education to see if he could find any clauses or things that would be bad for him. He failed, so as far as he knew, there was nothing hidden in the dense legalese of the document. He signed. I then, as the lawyer, congratulated him for taking on the post of Captain for this crew's ship, The Perfect Patsy. I went on to explain that, as Captain, he would be legally responsible and accountable for all the activities of the ship and its crew. The experienced guys were in on it, but the new guy was as surprised as I hoped. I dropped enough clues about the contract that he knew something was up, but not that he'd be captain. And a scapegoat. He said, "I'm going to insist that you guys call me 'Captain.'" I was ready for this, though. "Actually, it says in the contract that they don't. Very specifically."
     
    After that, I basically repurposed a few encounters from the Beginner Game for combat. The new guy proved to be a vengeful, trophy-taking murder machine with a chip on his shoulder about being tricked. The rest was basically a breeze. A hilarious game of clumsy thugs and very gullible Gamorreans. Also, the party has now captured a master bounty hunter and his useless apprentice and is preparing to question them. The Gank assassin is really looking forward to this.
     
    And these guys are all hooked, now.
  8. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from knasserII in Finally played the one trick I've been waiting to for so long   
    So, tonight, I started a new game of Edge of the Empire with all first-time players. I'd managed to secure 3 RPG-experienced players a while ago with a total novice to RPGs as a 4th. The plan, the three experienced guys formed the core of the crew. They arrive at a space station run by a minor Hutt crime lord, so that they can recruit a new crewmember. They take a table at a dive bar to wait for their contact, a Rodian lawyer who found this new guy. 
     
    Here's the part I've been waiting to use: The lawyer slides a datapad in front of the new guy, a surprisingly bloodthirsty Gank assassin as it happens, and explains that it's his contract. To teach him rolling tests, I got this guy to test Education to see if he could find any clauses or things that would be bad for him. He failed, so as far as he knew, there was nothing hidden in the dense legalese of the document. He signed. I then, as the lawyer, congratulated him for taking on the post of Captain for this crew's ship, The Perfect Patsy. I went on to explain that, as Captain, he would be legally responsible and accountable for all the activities of the ship and its crew. The experienced guys were in on it, but the new guy was as surprised as I hoped. I dropped enough clues about the contract that he knew something was up, but not that he'd be captain. And a scapegoat. He said, "I'm going to insist that you guys call me 'Captain.'" I was ready for this, though. "Actually, it says in the contract that they don't. Very specifically."
     
    After that, I basically repurposed a few encounters from the Beginner Game for combat. The new guy proved to be a vengeful, trophy-taking murder machine with a chip on his shoulder about being tricked. The rest was basically a breeze. A hilarious game of clumsy thugs and very gullible Gamorreans. Also, the party has now captured a master bounty hunter and his useless apprentice and is preparing to question them. The Gank assassin is really looking forward to this.
     
    And these guys are all hooked, now.
  9. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Andres Vorstal in Humorous Item Qualities   
    I sometimes like to include superficial quirks to items which can be amusing, but very occasionally useful. People tend to get pretty attached to their weird items. And sometimes you can work it into the game that, say, a ship flies past and the party recognizes the distinctive rattling sound of its engines.
     
    How about this:
     
    I Don't Even Hear It Anymore:
    Item emits a strange and distinctive noise when used, but with no apparent ill effects. "Your blaster makes a sort of quacking sound when fired. It's weird, and it draws some curious looks, but it seems to work just fine."
     
    It's a [species name] Thing:
    Item is designed to appeal to the aesthetic or cultural sensitivities of a specific species, at the cost of offending or disturbing most other species. "Taking a closer look, you notice the blaster's buttstock appears to be carved in the shape of a female wookiee doing... something. It's both distracting and highly disturbing."
     
    Permanent Marker:
    Item was tastelessly or incriminatingly decorated by the previous owner, and it is impossible to remove without destroying the item. "You wish you could remove the 'Hello Wompy' sticker the last owner applied to the fighter's canopy, but it's permanently fused to the transparisteel."
  10. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Braendig in Humorous Item Qualities   
    I sometimes like to include superficial quirks to items which can be amusing, but very occasionally useful. People tend to get pretty attached to their weird items. And sometimes you can work it into the game that, say, a ship flies past and the party recognizes the distinctive rattling sound of its engines.
     
    How about this:
     
    I Don't Even Hear It Anymore:
    Item emits a strange and distinctive noise when used, but with no apparent ill effects. "Your blaster makes a sort of quacking sound when fired. It's weird, and it draws some curious looks, but it seems to work just fine."
     
    It's a [species name] Thing:
    Item is designed to appeal to the aesthetic or cultural sensitivities of a specific species, at the cost of offending or disturbing most other species. "Taking a closer look, you notice the blaster's buttstock appears to be carved in the shape of a female wookiee doing... something. It's both distracting and highly disturbing."
     
    Permanent Marker:
    Item was tastelessly or incriminatingly decorated by the previous owner, and it is impossible to remove without destroying the item. "You wish you could remove the 'Hello Wompy' sticker the last owner applied to the fighter's canopy, but it's permanently fused to the transparisteel."
  11. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Comrade Cosmonaut in Humorous Item Qualities   
    I sometimes like to include superficial quirks to items which can be amusing, but very occasionally useful. People tend to get pretty attached to their weird items. And sometimes you can work it into the game that, say, a ship flies past and the party recognizes the distinctive rattling sound of its engines.
     
    How about this:
     
    I Don't Even Hear It Anymore:
    Item emits a strange and distinctive noise when used, but with no apparent ill effects. "Your blaster makes a sort of quacking sound when fired. It's weird, and it draws some curious looks, but it seems to work just fine."
     
    It's a [species name] Thing:
    Item is designed to appeal to the aesthetic or cultural sensitivities of a specific species, at the cost of offending or disturbing most other species. "Taking a closer look, you notice the blaster's buttstock appears to be carved in the shape of a female wookiee doing... something. It's both distracting and highly disturbing."
     
    Permanent Marker:
    Item was tastelessly or incriminatingly decorated by the previous owner, and it is impossible to remove without destroying the item. "You wish you could remove the 'Hello Wompy' sticker the last owner applied to the fighter's canopy, but it's permanently fused to the transparisteel."
  12. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from bradknowles in Finally played the one trick I've been waiting to for so long   
    So, tonight, I started a new game of Edge of the Empire with all first-time players. I'd managed to secure 3 RPG-experienced players a while ago with a total novice to RPGs as a 4th. The plan, the three experienced guys formed the core of the crew. They arrive at a space station run by a minor Hutt crime lord, so that they can recruit a new crewmember. They take a table at a dive bar to wait for their contact, a Rodian lawyer who found this new guy. 
     
    Here's the part I've been waiting to use: The lawyer slides a datapad in front of the new guy, a surprisingly bloodthirsty Gank assassin as it happens, and explains that it's his contract. To teach him rolling tests, I got this guy to test Education to see if he could find any clauses or things that would be bad for him. He failed, so as far as he knew, there was nothing hidden in the dense legalese of the document. He signed. I then, as the lawyer, congratulated him for taking on the post of Captain for this crew's ship, The Perfect Patsy. I went on to explain that, as Captain, he would be legally responsible and accountable for all the activities of the ship and its crew. The experienced guys were in on it, but the new guy was as surprised as I hoped. I dropped enough clues about the contract that he knew something was up, but not that he'd be captain. And a scapegoat. He said, "I'm going to insist that you guys call me 'Captain.'" I was ready for this, though. "Actually, it says in the contract that they don't. Very specifically."
     
    After that, I basically repurposed a few encounters from the Beginner Game for combat. The new guy proved to be a vengeful, trophy-taking murder machine with a chip on his shoulder about being tricked. The rest was basically a breeze. A hilarious game of clumsy thugs and very gullible Gamorreans. Also, the party has now captured a master bounty hunter and his useless apprentice and is preparing to question them. The Gank assassin is really looking forward to this.
     
    And these guys are all hooked, now.
  13. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Chxckmate in Finally played the one trick I've been waiting to for so long   
    So, tonight, I started a new game of Edge of the Empire with all first-time players. I'd managed to secure 3 RPG-experienced players a while ago with a total novice to RPGs as a 4th. The plan, the three experienced guys formed the core of the crew. They arrive at a space station run by a minor Hutt crime lord, so that they can recruit a new crewmember. They take a table at a dive bar to wait for their contact, a Rodian lawyer who found this new guy. 
     
    Here's the part I've been waiting to use: The lawyer slides a datapad in front of the new guy, a surprisingly bloodthirsty Gank assassin as it happens, and explains that it's his contract. To teach him rolling tests, I got this guy to test Education to see if he could find any clauses or things that would be bad for him. He failed, so as far as he knew, there was nothing hidden in the dense legalese of the document. He signed. I then, as the lawyer, congratulated him for taking on the post of Captain for this crew's ship, The Perfect Patsy. I went on to explain that, as Captain, he would be legally responsible and accountable for all the activities of the ship and its crew. The experienced guys were in on it, but the new guy was as surprised as I hoped. I dropped enough clues about the contract that he knew something was up, but not that he'd be captain. And a scapegoat. He said, "I'm going to insist that you guys call me 'Captain.'" I was ready for this, though. "Actually, it says in the contract that they don't. Very specifically."
     
    After that, I basically repurposed a few encounters from the Beginner Game for combat. The new guy proved to be a vengeful, trophy-taking murder machine with a chip on his shoulder about being tricked. The rest was basically a breeze. A hilarious game of clumsy thugs and very gullible Gamorreans. Also, the party has now captured a master bounty hunter and his useless apprentice and is preparing to question them. The Gank assassin is really looking forward to this.
     
    And these guys are all hooked, now.
  14. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Icosiel in Finally played the one trick I've been waiting to for so long   
    So, tonight, I started a new game of Edge of the Empire with all first-time players. I'd managed to secure 3 RPG-experienced players a while ago with a total novice to RPGs as a 4th. The plan, the three experienced guys formed the core of the crew. They arrive at a space station run by a minor Hutt crime lord, so that they can recruit a new crewmember. They take a table at a dive bar to wait for their contact, a Rodian lawyer who found this new guy. 
     
    Here's the part I've been waiting to use: The lawyer slides a datapad in front of the new guy, a surprisingly bloodthirsty Gank assassin as it happens, and explains that it's his contract. To teach him rolling tests, I got this guy to test Education to see if he could find any clauses or things that would be bad for him. He failed, so as far as he knew, there was nothing hidden in the dense legalese of the document. He signed. I then, as the lawyer, congratulated him for taking on the post of Captain for this crew's ship, The Perfect Patsy. I went on to explain that, as Captain, he would be legally responsible and accountable for all the activities of the ship and its crew. The experienced guys were in on it, but the new guy was as surprised as I hoped. I dropped enough clues about the contract that he knew something was up, but not that he'd be captain. And a scapegoat. He said, "I'm going to insist that you guys call me 'Captain.'" I was ready for this, though. "Actually, it says in the contract that they don't. Very specifically."
     
    After that, I basically repurposed a few encounters from the Beginner Game for combat. The new guy proved to be a vengeful, trophy-taking murder machine with a chip on his shoulder about being tricked. The rest was basically a breeze. A hilarious game of clumsy thugs and very gullible Gamorreans. Also, the party has now captured a master bounty hunter and his useless apprentice and is preparing to question them. The Gank assassin is really looking forward to this.
     
    And these guys are all hooked, now.
  15. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from TitchFender in R2 PC   
    One of my players really wanted to do an R2 droid, but with some modifications. Basically, I determined that some of the modifications that make him a viable character required pulling some stock equipment. For example, his former owner installed a simulacrum of his own personality, including a module that lets him speak normally. Also, he's an exceptional pilot. I didn't require credits for this, but I did say he lacks the standard level of slicing ability because of how much processing power the simulated personality and enhanced piloting function requires. He wanted to carry a blaster, so I said it's installed where the standard holo-projector would have been.
  16. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Sarone in Stormtrooper game ideas   
    The depiction of stormtroopers in the movies was always a failing in the same way adversary soldiers are in a lot of adventure movies. Just a crowd of guys in uniforms running with guns, shooting from the hip, not moving in any organized way. Still, the fiction characterizes Stormtroopers as basically being marines, so I always write them as being skilled professional soldiers, and I assume that they are, in fact, organized the way you would expect soldiers or marines are. Squad and fireteam members should have roles to play, even among stormtroopers. Marksmen, support gunners, medics, etc.
     
    I think it could be really interesting to takes some cues from Black Hawk Down, in scenarios and in characterization. Your team, since you say they're not the elite team of super-badass commandos, could be deployed as a element in a much larger operation. Maybe something in the operation goes wrong and the team's mission of securing the perimeter becomes some thing else, like chasing down an escaping target or rescuing the crew of a downed transport.
     
    Also, your team of tough professional soldiers could interact with, or at least see in action, a group of near-superhuman elite commandos. Say, your team is taking on some kind of armored vehicle. It's tough but they manage to bring it down with a little luck and a lot of firepower. Suddenly, a second one shows up. It looks bad, but one of the elite guys jumps in, plants a charge on the the enemy tank and boom. Just another day for one of those guys.
     
    I guess the other thing to think about in an Imperial military setting, is taking advantage of the overwhelming fire support offered by the Imperial Navy. Test communication skills or cool by accurately calling in fire missions or air strikes, or use beacons or target designators.
  17. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from awayputurwpn in Boost and Setback Dice vs. Difficulty   
    I guess my perspective with this example is that I would compare an outdoor cliff face that is a bit treacherous to an indoor climbing surface that has man-made hazards, and call them equal difficulty. Say, compare running an indoor obstacle course with running through a tricky jungle with a similar array of challenges. So, it's particularly if, or maybe even only if, this was a prepared event. 
     
    This is where I think GM discretion comes in. If the party says, "let's climb that wall," then the I as GM say, "It's this kind of wall, but these are the environmental conditions." That's definitely optimal conditions plus modifiers. But if you write your scenario with a part that says, "The party must scale a cliff face, difficult because of the environment, to continue," then it's all difficulty. In either case I would consider gear and foreknowledge (of terrain or hazards, for example) to be boosts. Unexpectedly bad environmental conditions, because I feel the group needs more challenge than they've been getting, is setback then.
     
    I guess any formula for challenge can be subverted if you plan it that way. Which, I'll admit, is less helpful to someone looking for rule clarification. So, maybe I'm a little wrong anyway.
  18. Like
    PhilMetalJacket reacted to GM Stark in Boost and Setback Dice vs. Difficulty   
    And if your GM is a hipster, he might even make it a PBR. 
    (that might be a regional reference)
  19. Like
    PhilMetalJacket reacted to GM Stark in Boost and Setback Dice vs. Difficulty   
    For a third perspective: If a regular, dry cliff with no wind is 2 purples, the wetness and risk of falling into jagged rocks below is an upgrade. Add a setback for wind making it more difficult, and one for being shot at, now you are at 1 Challenge, 1 Difficulty and 2 setback. 
  20. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from What in Sourcebook speculation and hopes   
    I wonder, will Mandalore really get its own sourcebook, or will Mandalorian humans just be something in the Bounty Hunter book? Mandalorians are certainly at least as idiosyncratic as Corellians and feature prominently in a lot of recent lore. But the region doesn't have the same significance as the Corellian Sector or Hutt Space, I don't think. And I have trouble imagining the Bounty Hunter sourcebook not having Boba Fett on almost every page.
  21. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from Robin Graves in ghost stories   
    Speaking of out of control droids, systems that are strangely out of control can be really creepy. In particular, turning things off only to have the spontaneously re-activate later. See, things refusing to stay on can be simple decrepitude, but things not staying off, now that's just not right. Your party disables the music playing over the ship-wide PA only to have come back on later. Or an automated recording on loop, same story. Maybe a droid you de-activated a while ago has just appeared again, running around and bleeping away.
     
    I guess it's particularly akin to a haunted amusement park atmosphere.
  22. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from miishelle in ghost stories   
    Speaking of out of control droids, systems that are strangely out of control can be really creepy. In particular, turning things off only to have the spontaneously re-activate later. See, things refusing to stay on can be simple decrepitude, but things not staying off, now that's just not right. Your party disables the music playing over the ship-wide PA only to have come back on later. Or an automated recording on loop, same story. Maybe a droid you de-activated a while ago has just appeared again, running around and bleeping away.
     
    I guess it's particularly akin to a haunted amusement park atmosphere.
  23. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from LibrariaNPC in ghost stories   
    Speaking of out of control droids, systems that are strangely out of control can be really creepy. In particular, turning things off only to have the spontaneously re-activate later. See, things refusing to stay on can be simple decrepitude, but things not staying off, now that's just not right. Your party disables the music playing over the ship-wide PA only to have come back on later. Or an automated recording on loop, same story. Maybe a droid you de-activated a while ago has just appeared again, running around and bleeping away.
     
    I guess it's particularly akin to a haunted amusement park atmosphere.
  24. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from FangGrip in Sourcebook speculation and hopes   
    I wonder, will Mandalore really get its own sourcebook, or will Mandalorian humans just be something in the Bounty Hunter book? Mandalorians are certainly at least as idiosyncratic as Corellians and feature prominently in a lot of recent lore. But the region doesn't have the same significance as the Corellian Sector or Hutt Space, I don't think. And I have trouble imagining the Bounty Hunter sourcebook not having Boba Fett on almost every page.
  25. Like
    PhilMetalJacket got a reaction from dougansf in Sourcebook speculation and hopes   
    I wonder, will Mandalore really get its own sourcebook, or will Mandalorian humans just be something in the Bounty Hunter book? Mandalorians are certainly at least as idiosyncratic as Corellians and feature prominently in a lot of recent lore. But the region doesn't have the same significance as the Corellian Sector or Hutt Space, I don't think. And I have trouble imagining the Bounty Hunter sourcebook not having Boba Fett on almost every page.
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