Harlock999

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About Harlock999

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  • Birthday 10/15/1972

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  1. The first comic featuring Don-Wan Kihotay was released by Marvel in 1978. The first edition of the WEG RPG was released in 1987. (The Marvel Star Wars comicbook series ended with issue #107 in late '86. Just fyi.)
  2. Apologies to those who hate resurrecting a dead thread... But I just ran across this image during a Google search, and now I'm thoroughly intrigued. Where did this particular pic originate? I like it SO much more than the one Bill Hughes drew for the Essential Chronology that utterly shat upon the K-Wing described in the Black Fleet Crisis. (It's a crying shame his version has been the one to stick around...)
  3. Time to nerd out... As a huge DD fan, I can tell you the radioactive materials (that bounced into the sewers, creating four new teenage mutant heroes) actually just unlocked Matt Murdock's enhanced senses. While, yes, also blinding him. Stick, who's also blind, finds Matt and lets him know he basically got a free ride; the ninja masters of the Chaste and the Hand spend decades tapping into mystic chi-like energies that will eventually grant them access to these enhanced senses, including Daredevil's iconic 360-degree radar. (Yeah, that same iconic radar sense that is missing from the Netflix series. Sigh.) Stick and his ninja fighters Stone, Shaft, Star, Flame, and Claw do indeed possess the same "superhero abilities" as Daredevil. It's Stick's mission to recruit Matt into the Chaste. However, newly-"mutated" Matt is too impulsive, reckless, and driven to avenge his father's death. So Stick trains him the best he can, keeps an eye on him, and decides to revisit the recruitment angle years later when Elektra becomes a concern. Anyway, most all of this comes straight from Frank Miller's PHENOMENAL first run on DD, which is highly recommended. Morningwood is absolutely right, however, about the blind master who has amazing fighting skills being a common trope ... a la Zatoichi. My sense of Chirrut was that he'd managed to tap into the Force for guidance, but was not a true Force Sensitive.
  4. PS - As to Abrams' The Force Awakens? Well, I don't think it was nearly as good as the more imaginative and gritty Rogue One, but TFA was certainly an enjoyable (again) popcorn flick. It's the kind of movie in which you just don't want to think too much... "Hey, I see X-Wings! I see TIE Fighters! I see stormtroopers! Another Death Star!" So no high concept stuff there. Unlike the derided prequels that - despite featuring the franchise's most stilted writing, acting, and directing - were extremely high concept with the premise of societies that use either cloned people or droids/drones to do their fighting for them. (Yeah, not a stretch of the imagination to see that sort of thing in our future, despite the possible ethical/moral implications.) And exploring the Jedi further and their place in the galaxy decades before the original trilogy was quite a lot of fun. [Edit: Actually, these days, I tend to see the prequels as the companion pieces to the spectacular Clone Wars series.]
  5. As one of the few big Trek fans around here, I have to say I'm always astounded when people still throw Simon Pegg's "even numbered ones are better than the odd numbered ones" (from Spaced) argument out there. And, Ghost Mouse, you didn't even like Pegg's film in the new franchise! The Motion Picture, The Wrath of Khan, The Search for Spock, and The Voyage Home are hands down the best Trek films to date. They had the best production values, the most imagination, the best writing, the best directing, the best acting, and felt true to the spirit of the original series. The Final Frontier and The Undiscovered Country looked at the success of The Voyage Home (the comedic one with the whales) and started tying some kind of silly, self-aware vibe to the look/feel of the new (at that time) Next Generation series... And the results were abominable; Star Treks V and VI had simplistic plots full of hollow comedy and fanwank BS. Seriously, I'm always ready to provide a detailed list of reasons as to why The Undiscovered Country - a "fan favorite" - is actually a terrible, terrible, terrible Trek film. I would agree that First Contact was a really fun popcorn flick, but it cannot compare to the First Four. The Abrams-era Trek movies are also fun popcorn movies. But, honestly, they feel more like "Super Space Starmen in Space Shooting Lasers" than Star Trek... *two bits*
  6. It's true BioWare wanted more freedom to craft a roleplaying experience that wouldn't have to follow the "rules" and expectations set forth by the films... ...and picking a setting 4000(?) years in the past seemed a great way to avoid these issues. But, again, the developers did indeed borrow heavily from the TotJ stories and lore for their games. So, yeah, obviously they were planting KOTOR firmly in "EU canon;" BioWare just wanted to change the looks of the starships and tech as they believed the comicbook art was "ugly." That said? In the 90s and early 00s, the only people who truly worried about what was canonical or not were the minutia-driven, diehard fans. To most of us? If it didn't have George Lucas' fingerprints all over it, it was never truly canon. So who really cared if it all fit together seamlessly?
  7. I'll admit I quite like the looks of most of the KOTOR tech. That said, turning the truly unique Mandalorian Basilisk war droid into a f'ing Starviper (in KOTOR 2)?!? That was ... miserable. At least we got to see the return of the original design in the PS2, PSP, and Wii versions of The Force Unleashed.
  8. Ha. I've never read through that particular book so this was quite a shock to see... Guess you really do learn something new every day! Crazy!
  9. KOTOR 2 on Nar Shaddaa. It's filled with Gand.
  10. Goes without saying.
  11. The only things in these two books that were not shown in the original trilogy are the Z-95 Headhunter from "Han Solo at Star's End," the Imperial Customs Frigate (created by West End Games?), swoop bikes from "Han Solo's Revenge," vibroblades from Brian Daley's Han Solo book trilogy, and ... I think that's it. The Sourcebook also includes a lot of concept artwork that was later transformed into actual stuff for the EU. Oh, and the Quixotic Jedi template is CLEARLY a tribute to Don Wan-Kihotay, a character from the "Seven Samurai/Magnificent Seven" arc from the first year of Marvel's Star Wars comics.
  12. To be fair, the KOTOR games borrowed heavily from these Dark Horse Comics stories... The only thing that was truly changed were the tech, as the video game designers didn't like the looks of most of the ships from the Tales of the Jedi comics. But, yeah, anything from that time period is now labeled KOTOR or TOR. The Tales of the Jedi Companion is the only actual supplement I still own from WEG. (I still have the original RPG and sourcebook as well as the revised second edition RPG and its sourcebook.) And if I were to run a Tales of the Jedi campaign these days? I'd make sure to create a lot of stats for the incredible wealth of new material from KOTORs 1 and 2. Although I do believe some folks online may have already beaten me to the punch...
  13. So the Gunboats are much, much better than the stuff from Waves 1-7? Making the Aces/Veterans packs necessary for the other ships to compete? (This is my main concern.) Or are you simply making the general statement that I should get Imperial Veterans if I want to get into the tournament scene these days? (I'm less concerned with this issue.)
  14. HUGE fan of the old X-Wing/TIE Fighter PC games and I do believe I've posted in this thread in years past... However, I've been out of the X-Wing loop since the release of the Hound's Tooth so, as I only have ships from Waves 1-7, will I experience any power creep or unfair balancing issues if I purchase a couple of Gunboats? Or should I be OK? BTW, I only have the original X-Wing Miniatures Game, not the Force Awakens version with the new deck. Not sure if that matters, but just fyi.
  15. I'll remember you said this...