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Sileo

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  1. Like
    Sileo got a reaction from AustinKatan in Looking For A Group In Austin, TX   
    I'm yet another one hanging out in the Austin area here. I used to play multiple times a week before I made a couple of cross country moves, I've kept up on the books and online games but been a couple of years since I did a proper in person game.
     
    So definitely interested in seeing something pan out. During the week I usually can only get out of work at 1900 at the earliest, so weekends tend to work better in my day to day.
     
    Depending on how the wind blows and/or the timing, I could probably convince my wife to come to the game as well.
  2. Like
    Sileo reacted to kickgirl in Character Artwork Thread   
    Hey everyone! It's been awhile since I shared any arts with you guys, so I thought I would post some!!!   
    I've got some new fake comic covers from our current adventures:



    This was actually our original cast of PC characters. Look how young and sweet and alive they all are! *lol*



    And last (but certainly never least) a little love from Darth Syren for all of you. ♥

  3. Like
    Sileo reacted to Kyla in How to handle gray jedi?   
    I don't necessarily hold to the Guardian/Consular/Sentinel color schema, but rather I personally like how they correspond to the Chakra's:
     
    Blue represents the throat, and is our willingness to see solutions in everything. Our resources are made known, our expression are clarified like crystals, and we convey ourselves with a mix of playfulness and natural authority.
     
     
    Yellow represents the solar plexus and the beacon held under a magnifying glass. What we submit for contemplation is amplified by the solar plexus chakra. This is because we have entered the dawn of specialized perception. When yellow gently strokes its fingertips across your awareness, it's prompting focus. Focus into the core of inner being, inner intelligence. This yellowy core asks us to honor the fullness of who we are.
     
    Green represents the heart, and is connection and growth. It's a cue to get back in step with the beating rhythm of the pulse of all life. Place your awareness upon your neurological, and vascular networks - then translate these networks into externals like internet pathways, road grids, and relationships.
     
     
    Red represents the root chakra, Just like the core of the Earth, it pulses and swells with bright crimson radiant heat. It is a clear sign of visceral, primitive power. It's the sparking place for big blasts of raw creation.
     
    Depending on the attitudes any given Jedi has towards their duty, these colors flow into the crystals when they commune with them, tainting their hues into the crystal itself. At least, that's what makes my socks go up and down I suppose.
  4. Like
    Sileo reacted to Kyla in How to handle gray jedi?   
  5. Like
    Sileo reacted to Maelora in How to handle gray jedi?   
    "I love you, and I want to have your -"  - oh that upset people last time out, didn't it?
     
    *ahem*
     
    <said in deep, manly voice>  "I greatly agree with you, sirrah, and concede you have a very valid point!" 
     
    *MarcyVerse rambling*
     
    For my part, we play the Force as just that. It's mysterious and unknowable, even to the experts who find it comfortable.  It doesn't care how or why you use it.  Every PC with a Force-sensitive career has a 'light' Morality and a 'dark' Passion, representing the extremes of their personality. So 'light and dark' are a thing,  but they likely represent law and control, against chaos and emotion, and are not intended to be good or evil. The actual characters, of course, can be so! Just as anyone can.  Our system is built around that, being a little like a simplified version of 'cautious and reckless stance' in WHFRP3.
     
    Also, we have a lot of Sensitive traditions.  The Jedi are simply the expy for Christianity or Islam here - they are the most aggressive and widespread tradition, but certainly not the only game in town. They call it 'The Force' and are steeped in tradition and odd rituals. Other traditions may call it 'speaking to the spirits' 'magick' or 'Sith alchemy' or 'biotics' or whatever. Statistically, it's all the same thing.
     
    Our Sith are just a sect of the Jedi - rebellious, emotional, maverick, iconoclastic. The Jedi use them as a kind of holding pen for their outliers.  The Sith work with the Jedi when they have common cause (which is most of the time) and generally act as a nuisance in those rare times of peace. They are analogous to Protestant and Catholic Christians, or Sunni and Shia Muslims - they might fight at times (even often!) but are still sects with the same root.  
     
    Our Jedi are both brave and committed protectors who would lay down their lives for their worlds, and intolerant, Force-supremacist jerks who believe the 'end justifies the means'.  Most are incredibly ruthless in doing their jobs. In some parts of the galaxy, they are utterly loathed; other parts see them as heroes and worthy protectors.  They are few in number but have armies of clones and droids as cannon fodder, led by veterans of the Clone Wars and the Exodus War against the Vong/Tyranids/whatever race they exterminated like vermin on the Far Rim.  The amoral members tend to do well. The really moral ones like Ben almost always end up leaving. They are anti-heroes and antagonists, rather than 'villains'.  Like the dying Empire, they are not a playable faction for PCs, though many PCs are ex-Jedi.  As the Empire has never used Sensitives outside of the Emperor's Hand (secret agents and assassins, very potent but not battlefield assets), the Imperials don't give a squibb's rear end about them.  The Jedi Inquisition, however, hunts down and tries to re-educate apostate Force adepts (or destroy them if they can't be educated...)  Lightsabers are quite rare, and holocrons all possess a horrifying secret...
     
    There are many other Traditions - the Followers of the Temple under Lucas Lars, who are recognisably 'good guys' (somewhere between the New Jedi Order and a 60's hippy cult). There are the various tribes of Dathomir, the militaristic initiates of the Emergent Project, who view the Alliance as their religion and are trained for the battlefield.  There are the Navigators, a mysterious sect who were once the Jedi Exploration Corps before they broke away.  And likely millions of other sects like Baran-Do, who keep a lower profile under the scrutiny of the Order.  
     
    The Jedi obsess over bloodlines and breeding. They are essentially Dune-style noble houses, who breed for Sensitives and desired traits. They cling to 'midichlorian theory', which posits that Sensitivity is a genetic factor, and has been derided as baseless quackery by every other tradition for thousands of years. Midichlorians exist, and they do... something. (Possibly measure diabetic blood sugars.)  What they definitely don't do is indicate the presence or power of Sensitivity, though the Order still puts them (and genetic superiority) at the centre of their spiritual beliefs.
     
    The Followers believe in personal responsibility and enlightenment.  Their 'leader', Lucas Lars (he hates the concept and sees himself as a teacher or guide) might be the most powerful Sensitive alive, but he's the son of moisture farmers with no Sensitivity in their history whatsoever. He teaches that Sensitivity can be learned through enlightenment, and that one day, every being might 'awaken' to their potential.
  6. Like
    Sileo reacted to Maelora in How to handle gray jedi?   
    Love the bit about crystals, Kyla!  I had a chat with Phee about this recently, about how a Sensitive's 'colour' really determines how they think, what their lightsabers look like, and why the three Jedi orders (or those taught by ex-Jedi) have the colours that they do.  
     
    In fact, consider your lovely descriptions of the colours 'stolen'!  (Apart from the fact that yellow represents something darker; our Sentinel Order is drawn from the most ruthless and amoral of the 'dark' Jedi...)
     
    Added to that, we decided that purple is the 'special snowflake' colour.  Revan and Mace Windu had this colour, and if you 'think in purple' you're either a super-confident person destined for greatness, or an arrogant grandstander who thinks he's better than everyone else.  Sometimes it's hard to tell the difference.
     
    White is favoured by non-Jedi, with connotations of balance, zen or purity.
     
    I suppose there are other colours like pink or orange.  We haven't decided if 'darksabers' are A Thing yet, but if they are, I'm betting the Sith would give their supplies of black eyeshadow and Bullet For My Valentine CDs to get hold of one! 
  7. Like
    Sileo got a reaction from Vestij Jai Galaar in How to handle gray jedi?   
    If we run with the assumption that signing up with the Imperial Navy makes you accountable for the actions of the people above you, then the people of Alderaan, who I am admittedly assuming here, who voted a rebellious Senator into office is accountable for his actions. Of course,there is only one penalty in the Empire for sedition against the Empire, so who can be surprised they blew up the world? One drawback to democracy is that everyone is held accountable for the decisions of the majority, one way or another. On principal, I am not arguing the point a battle station is a more valid(er) target than an entire world to most definitions and people, for the record; I very much agree with it.
     
    I'd have to be a lunatic to try and defend the Empire from a morality standpoint, I like to think I'm sane so I'll avoid that. If you hold an entire group accountable for one action, it becomes problematic to then not allow that logic to reach fruition with another because the general consensus is they are morally correct. The Empire is harsh and despotic, but to hold every individual accountable for the actions of a couple of megalomaniacs is difficult to hold all the way through. Many people on the Death Star no doubt questioned what happened on Alderaan. Blowing up the Death Star and killing two million some odd people, only served to galvanize the people who were reeling from Alderaan with a sizable sense of loss. Officers who were wavering in their loyalty had friends, lovers and classmates exploded by a dirt farmer who rolled a bunch of Triumphs. Many of them would be subjectively good people. As a valid military target, it certainly made sense to blow it up, but you got rid of enough people who were just following orders and trusting that their chain of command had an "ultimate good" in mind that yes, you should reflect on all the lives lost and feel terrible about it. 
     
    Star Wars as a series of movies tries very hard to skirt these moral grey areas, but there is a perspective where people see the good the Empire has done, especially if they are from one of the "hundred" that didn't get blown up, subjugated and worse to make a point. Rational people can argue over the finer points of that, but we loop back around to the notion that there are lots of grey in the setting they try overly hard to distill to black and white, light side and dark side. Luke Skywalker killed over two million people. End statement. Everything else is justifying why that was the only action he could have taken, and that's fine, but he has a sizable weight to carry for the rest of his life because it's a fair guess that not all of them deserved a disintegration. Doesn't mean he did anything wrong in the grand scheme, but only someone with an extreme manifestation of an anti-social personality disorder wouldn't be kept up at night by that action and the body count that follows.
  8. Like
    Sileo got a reaction from Vestij Jai Galaar in How to handle gray jedi?   
    I'd say you had innocents in both incidents. There are certainly rational reasons why the Death Star had to be destroyed, but the same can be said of Tarkin's Fear Doctrine (Is that even canon anymore) leading to the conclusion that blowing up one planet would spare a hundred more the same fate. The Empire seemed big on the kill/imprison one to warn a hundred technique.
     
    I'm pretty sure the guys cleaning the toilets and cooking food on the Death Star would be categorized as innocent by most. They blew up the Death Star to get at the few people willing to make the decision to use it, and Alderaan was destroyed for the few people who founded and pushed for the creation of the Alliance. Arguably both disproportionate responses with unnecessarily high body counts. Have to give it for Alderaan for the most involved folks killed for being on the wrong planet. Imagine being that poor sap just picking up a load of Nerf meat for a chain of restaurants and going "Huh, that's a new moon... what's that green light.."
     
    To add to the actual thread, and the above kind of hints at it, I always have to divide intention from outcome to really weigh "morality", with or without impact of the Force. Tarkin destroyed Alderaan to make a point. Luke destroyed the Death Star to spare another world the same fate. Both killed a significant number of people, or more accurately, were responsible for their demise in Tarkin's case, but one had a more goodly reason when judged by common conventions of morality in most societies. I'd award less Conflict to Mr. Skywalker for that reason, but he'd get some. Even when you justify it and accept you had to do it, it'd still weigh on you.
     
    And that's honestly as far as I take it. Some powers have inherent drawbacks to using one pip color versus another. If a character exists on the Paragon side of Light/Dark, I'll expect Strain expended to go so strongly against what is the best representation of your "philosophy of the Force" the system provides. I don't typically flip the Destiny Point unless it's drastically out of character. Otherwise, I tend to rule it based on intention/outcome. Using the Force to terrorize a Stormtrooper into fleeing a scene to avoid killing him wouldn't generate Conflict. Using it to inspire his sense of compassion to act aggressively and kill his superior who just summarily executed someone, would generate Conflict in my opinion. So far it hasn't caused many problems in my groups balance wise, but I have certainly played with folks who would find some way to exploit it.
  9. Like
    Sileo reacted to Blackbird888 in Career Adventure Seeds (Force and Destiny Edition)   
    Decided to throw together some adventure seeds, much like this thread. Also so these ideas don't just disappear into the void of my mind.*
     
    Consular
     
    Guardian
     
    Seeker
     
    *And don't say that would be a good thing.
  10. Like
    Sileo reacted to Absol197 in All Technicians? New GM + New (Teen) Players   
    NEVER!!!1! You can't control me! My 1,000th post will be in the place I want it to be, not in...
    Wait...
    ...DANGIT >_< !!!
  11. Like
    Sileo got a reaction from SFC Snuffy in How to handle gray jedi?   
    Thanks for that, I now have something to correct on that framework. Explains quite a bit about how the rolls have seemed unfairly dark biased, too.
  12. Like
    Sileo reacted to Absol197 in Trends, Statistics, and Predictions!   
    *sigh*
  13. Like
    Sileo reacted to whafrog in "Help me Obi-Wan, I've been accused of GM Meta-Gaming"   
    In addition to the "Like" button, there should be a LOL button...
  14. Like
    Sileo got a reaction from Shlambate in Trends, Statistics, and Predictions!   
    Wouldn't that be the computational equivalent of being your own grandpa? May explain why No Disintegrations hasn't been posted yet, lack of delta algorithms can't do swell things to that first computer's ability to process.
  15. Like
    Sileo reacted to Absol197 in Trends, Statistics, and Predictions!   
    ...But then how...oh, wait, I have a feeling I know the answer already...
  16. Like
    Sileo reacted to Desslok in Trends, Statistics, and Predictions!   
    You have the third computer tell the second computer. Duh.
  17. Like
    Sileo reacted to Desslok in Trends, Statistics, and Predictions!   
    What - you mean a fourth computer? Don't be ridiculous! That would be silly. No, the first computer simply pushes the third computers button!
  18. Like
    Sileo got a reaction from pi3orionis in House Rules additions to Crafting   
    I haven't really thought there were many issues with the crafting rules myself, but I do like the notion underlying this that someone will set out with a goal to build a piece of equipment with a specific quality. Someone may well set out to design an amphibious piece of armor. The potential outcome of them successfully making something that isn't amphibious would be a bit odd. (Don't quote me on the hard points working out here, it was just the quick and dirty example that sprang to mind).
     
    I'd be more inclined to go with Upgrading the skill check, or Upgrading the difficulty than adding Setback/Boost die. It also prevents someone with sufficiently high ranks of Gearhead from gaming the system.
  19. Like
    Sileo got a reaction from A7T in How to handle gray jedi?   
    I'd say you had innocents in both incidents. There are certainly rational reasons why the Death Star had to be destroyed, but the same can be said of Tarkin's Fear Doctrine (Is that even canon anymore) leading to the conclusion that blowing up one planet would spare a hundred more the same fate. The Empire seemed big on the kill/imprison one to warn a hundred technique.
     
    I'm pretty sure the guys cleaning the toilets and cooking food on the Death Star would be categorized as innocent by most. They blew up the Death Star to get at the few people willing to make the decision to use it, and Alderaan was destroyed for the few people who founded and pushed for the creation of the Alliance. Arguably both disproportionate responses with unnecessarily high body counts. Have to give it for Alderaan for the most involved folks killed for being on the wrong planet. Imagine being that poor sap just picking up a load of Nerf meat for a chain of restaurants and going "Huh, that's a new moon... what's that green light.."
     
    To add to the actual thread, and the above kind of hints at it, I always have to divide intention from outcome to really weigh "morality", with or without impact of the Force. Tarkin destroyed Alderaan to make a point. Luke destroyed the Death Star to spare another world the same fate. Both killed a significant number of people, or more accurately, were responsible for their demise in Tarkin's case, but one had a more goodly reason when judged by common conventions of morality in most societies. I'd award less Conflict to Mr. Skywalker for that reason, but he'd get some. Even when you justify it and accept you had to do it, it'd still weigh on you.
     
    And that's honestly as far as I take it. Some powers have inherent drawbacks to using one pip color versus another. If a character exists on the Paragon side of Light/Dark, I'll expect Strain expended to go so strongly against what is the best representation of your "philosophy of the Force" the system provides. I don't typically flip the Destiny Point unless it's drastically out of character. Otherwise, I tend to rule it based on intention/outcome. Using the Force to terrorize a Stormtrooper into fleeing a scene to avoid killing him wouldn't generate Conflict. Using it to inspire his sense of compassion to act aggressively and kill his superior who just summarily executed someone, would generate Conflict in my opinion. So far it hasn't caused many problems in my groups balance wise, but I have certainly played with folks who would find some way to exploit it.
  20. Like
    Sileo reacted to 2P51 in Brace talent cancel cover?   
    But they aren't disruptive, to me it needs to be something that is directly acting on the PC, not just around them. I think that's the reason for the rationale of why it doesn't apply to defense provided by armor and cover.
     
    Zero G doesn't add Boost dice to Agility tests, just Coordination checks, and that's in weak gravity not zero G. Their examples are poor using zero G in Brace and then more or less ruling it out as useful in the environmental description.  I'd say do what feels good and take the type of weapon into account in regards to whether it requires two hands or generates recoil.
  21. Like
    Sileo reacted to Richardbuxton in Looking To Make A Sleazy Lawyer   
    And Neimoidian is definitely the sleaze bag of Star Wars!
  22. Like
    Sileo reacted to 2P51 in NPCs...PCs...Monsters...n stuff...art   
  23. Like
    Sileo reacted to The Grand Falloon in How to handle gray jedi?   
    Uggghhh... the Grey Jedi thing.  Seriously, the way I always see this approached is just... bad.

       People are not True Neutral (and by the way, thank you D&D for giving us that obnoxious old alignment axis.  It was one of the few things improved in 4th edition, and then they went right back with 5th).  Nobody really thinks there's some sort of balance point between Good and Evil.  There are different arguments about "what is right?"  Those who seek "balance" don't seek a balance between Good and Evil.  Good comes from balance, Evil comes from imbalance.

        In the case of a "Grey Jedi,"  the people who would be called that are going to fall into two groups.  First will be those who aspire to the Jedi principles, but when push comes to shove, they just can't maintain it.  Whether out of fear or anger they just can't live up to their own ideals.  These guys probably have a lot of therapy sessions back at the Jedi temple.
     
       The others would be the "heretics."  Folks who disagree with certain aspects of Jedi teachings.  Depending on the points in question, these guys might be Light Side Paragons, or Dark Siders who still call themselves Jedi.  Considering the size of the Galaxy, and how often the Jedi Council had their heads in the (AHEM!) sand, I can't help but think that countless small Jedi heresies existed throughout the Republic and survived into the Imperial era.  For those that "skirt the Dark Side," you need to ask yourself "how and why?"  Probably the easiest approach is to have them reject the "Ends Do Not Justify The Means" philosophy that The Force works under.  Most days, doing the right thing leads to good results.  Jedi are tested when doing the "right thing" leads to bad results.  A "Grey Jedi" may be one who fully recognizes that an action will lead him to the Dark Side, but decides that it's more evil to put his own spiritual well being ahead of the results. Murdering warlords and things like that.

      I fully support players that want to have their characters get dangerously close to the Dark Side.  One of mine is saying, "Oh I want him to be a Jedi, just, you know, not the best Jedi."  That's great.  It's fun.  But the character should have some reason other than "seeking a balance between balance and imbalance."  What's his flaw that tempts him to the Dark Side?  Is it a moral flaw?  Philosophical flaw?  Emotional flaw?  Does he tout the wisdom and temperance of the Jedi, and then Unleash when he's in danger?  Or does he just think he's strong-willed enough to get away with doing what he wants?
  24. Like
    Sileo reacted to 2P51 in How Triumph Works   
    Read the write up for Bola, it's awesome to get a Triumph when you're successful.  Improved Stunning Blow, they're awesome. When you roll Vigilance, they're awesome.
  25. Like
    Sileo reacted to The Grand Falloon in "Help me Obi-Wan, I've been accused of GM Meta-Gaming"   
    The standard TIE fighter is one of the fastest, most maneuverable starfighters in the galaxy.  The Interceptor even moreso, and I presume these prototypes have something going on that makes a test pilot giggle like a child on Christmas morning.  Now, imagine you're out with your friends, and Mazda has given you a set of concept Miatas, with engines more powerful than a car that small has any right to have.  It corners like it's on rails, it accelerates like Thor himself just smacked it in the rear with his hammer.  Also it has laser guns.
      Suddenly some schmuck in a Winnebago busts through the gates into the experimental test track, with his redneck buddies hanging out the side firing shotguns at you.  Eager to see what this thing can really do, you say, "Alright, boys, let's light these turkeys up!"   You start driving crazy circles around this thing, blasting at it with your hood lasers, when suddenly the Winnebago flips a 180 degree turn, somehow gets back up to speed almost instantly, rams into a pile of tires, launching himself into the air, flipping over you while the rednecks fire gleefully at the ground through the sunroof, lands like some kind of graceful hippopotamus behind you, and carries on driving as if nothing happened.
     
       Now, perhaps you don't realize you're mechanically unable to attack, but I'm pretty sure you're gonna realize something crazy just happened, and maybe you should take a step back and observe this situation for a minute from a distance.
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