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Twillera

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  1. Twillera

    You know you're playing Dark Heresy when....

    Okay I want to hear the story While on a planet, the party came across a strange vault like structure, made up of some form of crystal. The only way in was with a strange blue liquid. The blue liquid would melt the crystal for a short period of time. This allowed you to get inside. It was also the only way to get access to the items inside the vault, which were also protected. You were only given 2 viles, enough to get in and out, but not enough to get any of the treasures. The assassin we had in the party at the time had a tendency of getting in rather odd situations, and managed to fall into the deep bowels of this place. While down their she uncovered that they liquid was produced by a strange glowing blue flower. Which she shot and killed, and took the secret of this flower to her death. Jump forward several years, and the party returns to this planet. While searching the room of a figure of importance, they noticed several large potted plants, all containing a strange glowing blue flower. The players realized what it was instantly, however none of the characters had any remote reason to suspect them at all. Our one player was trying very hard to come up with a reason to take them, and inevitably tried to bribe the NPC guardsman with us to carry the potted planet (Far to large for any one person to carry) through a zombie infested planet while we were on mission to search for a heretical traitor psyker. Unfortunately the player was unable to come up with a good enough excuse as to why he would want it for me (the GM) to allow it. It was however, a very entertaining 30 minutes of trying to convince that a plotted plant was a valuable spoil of the inquisition.
  2. Twillera

    You know you're playing Dark Heresy when....

    - When bribing a planetary governor is a mundane side quest. - When you offer the party psyker the power "Summon spacehulk" If they kill the party in the name of chaos. - When a simple side quest ends with the purging of thousands of innocent civilians, and is considered a success. - When your party assumes every bad guy they face is terrifying enough to kill them all, and to be fair, they are probably right.
  3. Twillera

    How do you Suck as a GM

    I cannot have a conversation with myself to save my life. If a player talks to an NPC, that is easy for me, but when two NPC's are required to talk to each other, it is the hardest thing ever, even if I know exactly what each is supposed to say. I have two other problems, that often work together. The first is that I believe anything 40k should involve a lot of death. Especially player death. I know my players don't really want me killing of their characters every 2 sessions, but I cant help but feel that they probably should. The second is that I pull punches way to often. As soon as my players start to show any signs of dissatisfaction with a situation or combat, I pull back and nerf it to the ground. The problem these two is that it has ended up with the players ending up inches from death, but never dieing. Over, and over again. Even in situations where they really should have died by all accounts.
  4. I was reading the dual shot talent, and I noticed that it didn't mention anything about what happens when you jam/overheat (Unless I am being a derp and missed it, which is very possible). You are supposed to role a single test for both weapons, but what happens if: 1: You jam, do both weapons jam? 2: One has unreliable/overheat/was fired full or semi auto, while the other does not, do they both jam on a 91/94+ 3: Both have overheat, do they both overheat on a 91+ 4: If they do not both jam/overheat, how do you determine which does?
  5. To be fair, most inquisitors probably do go a little insane ordering exterminatus. Exterminatus, even for inquisitors, is an incredibly mentally and morally taxing act, and is pretty much the final option. I think it would be pretty fair to state that an inquisitor that does not feel anything about using exterminatus on innocent is probably the definition of insane. Also most times you use exterminatus you use it when the thing or things you are killing is worth the lives of billions. You also have to remember that these are acolytes, not inquisitors. Inquisitors have had to kill the innocent person in the crowd many times over, acolytes probably not. I personally see it as the inquisitor probably already HAS gained that insanity, and now is no longer fazed by that. For me one of the biggest way to gain insanity would be through knowledge. I am not use if it is in DH2, but in DH1 you could gain insanity simply from taking a forbidden lore test. Learning anything outside of what the character would naturally believe could cause insanity. Say a daemon pops out of the warp. You may pass the fear test, but if this is the first time you have ever seen a daemon, you might just get insanity from it anyways, as you have seen the impossible happen, and it wants to kill you.
  6. In my game, I give out xp through a system of questions. The first 10 or so are questions about the mission they are on, which I score secretly depending on how close they are. The second half are team questions based off what the party did, and they have to convince me that they achieved these. For example some would be: Did you eliminate a threat to the imperium Did you make a new ally Did you sacrifice anything irreplaceable for the imperium If they did these things and can convince me of it, I give them xp, usually between 20-30 xp. The question that I am having difficulty marking is this: "Did you Improve the lives of the citizens of the imperium in the area you where in." The answer that has been given is this: "Yes! Through our actions, the faithless dogs of the Hive of the Emperor’s Light, have been shown the error of their ways! Clearly, Cole’s psychic phenomena was no coincidence, and was meant as a sign of the almighty God Emperor’s displeasure with the lack of faith in the populace. Through his almighty will, using Cole as the messenger of his disappointment in his people, the people have paid the price for their sacrilege, and those that remain after the purge will remember the bloody rains that their heresy summoned. Having seen the price of their sacrilege they shall be more mindful of the Emperor’s holy designs and of his servants, and their piety shall improve as a direct result. And what life could be better spent than in service to the Emperor?" For reference on what happened, the parties psyker rolled a 9 on a test and summoned bloody rain, several events later this led to the ecclesiarchy purging the whole hive block, killing countless thousands. However it had been noted that prior to this there had been resentment by some of the citizens and general dislike of the church in the area. When the fighting purging broke out, some of the citizens fought back, which made the whole thing much worse. I am conflicted if I should give this to them, as on the one hand, they killed probably thousands of innocents because of their mistake, and have only helped reinforce tyranny. On the other hand though, its 40k, and those peasants did not worship the holy god emperor of mankind, who rules from holy terra with grace and supreme authority nearly as much as they should have! (Should be noted none of the characters are overly all that much of a zealot)
  7. Twillera

    Bloodying Nurgle's Nose

    Although I disagree with giving him stats altogether, if you are, you 100% have to give him 777 wounds.
  8. In the current campaign which I am GMing, I have come accross the situation of having to handle requisitioning forces. Sounds simple enough, except for the slight detail of the inquisitor our acolytes work for being dead. Long story short, our inquisitor was betrayed by his right hand man, a powerful psyker, and the party has decided to stick together to get revenge. Everything is going pretty well and everyone is having fun. To not totally mess up the party, I said that the inquisitors ship and some of its crew have stuck around, and are willing to help them out (they also want revenge). A fair number of the crew and acolytes died with the inquisitor, or have just left, so right now the ship is pretty undermaned, but still works. Our parties psyker got the cool idea of trying to recrew the ship, and has even gone through the work of coming up with a decent and pretty cool way of getting our hands on enough gelt to pay the salaries. I have figured out what most things would cost, and which ones would be paid for by the inquisition (it is after all an inquisition ship, so it does have some sway) and which ones we would have to pay for. The problem I am having is when the idea of getting some members of the imperial guard to join our crew. With the party in a guardsman (commander) who has recently acquired a decent promotion. The idea that has been thrown around is getting her to use her position to get some guards to come and join us. It is a cool idea I want to let happen. As a commander in the imperial guard, getting troops under our command does not seem impossible, but taking them off and keeping them is a little bit more complicated. My questions are this: 1: Would a commander in the guard be able to take soldiers without having to flash the inquisitorial seal/bribe someone/or some other form of major action to get access to the soldiers. 2: If they are taken, who pays for them? Would we have to take on that burden, or would the imperial guard continue to pay them, or some other option 3: How often would imperial guards even get paid? They are often deployed for months/years at a time, so I can't think they would be holding all their money with them.
  9. Twillera

    Your campaigns running jokes.

    After asking my players what they thought happened to a former member of the team who disappeared, the terrifying, and totally real disease, space AIDS, is now an acceptable explanation for any death. I once had a servitor aid the party, who was most well known for the noise he made, a soft "ahhhhh" sound that I had a lot of fun doing (I would just sit there going "ahhhh" for a good minute whenever anyone tried to converse with the servitor). Ever since then any mention of a servitor would have the whole group whispering "ahhhh".
  10. Twillera

    Should I warn my players?

    The Imperial guard is very gun happy when dealing with there own non penal soldiers. If an officer even THINKS you disrespected them, they can shoot you. Penal legions are probably held on an even tighter leash. I don't think the commanders would have any regrets about ending a whole legion if they even suspected an uprising. A penal legion is far less equipped then a regular regiment, they don't get fancy things like air support, or tanks. They are given the most basic equipment and sent in. The penal legions are only sent into the worst of situations, often as a last ditch effort. I would think it would actually be very hard for a penal legion to pull off an uprising. When they are put on the planet they are given two options. Face the enemy and have a small chance of surviving, or turn against their masters and get shot down.
  11. Twillera

    Dodging bullets?!

    Sorry, these are objectively incorrect. 'A miss from the start' when you dodge a Vindicare's natural 1? No. The shot hit armour against a lascannon? No. The shooter didn't aim where you were going to be? Maybe, but that's what 'miss' rolls are for. 'A miss from the start' doesn't mean you're good at dodging, it means the other guy sucks. And if that's the case, why have Dodge at all? If it 'hits armour', why have Dodge at all? A Dodge is a Dodge on the part of the character Dodging. It isn't an indication of the armour worn by the Dodging character, and it isn't indicative of the skill of the shooter. At all. I never used a lascannon in any example though, and that is not the point. The point is that you can describe the outcome in other ways than simple dodging bullets, such as making it hit the armour or something else. In the example of the lascannon, maybe the las cannon takes longer to aim and so you have a higher chance of getting out of the way or w/e. I am not trying to argue that every single case out there has a reason for dodge, some won't, I am trying to say that there are multiple ways of explaining a dodge role then dodging bullets.
  12. Twillera

    Dodging bullets?!

    How you explain that situation does not have to be that you simply dodge one of the enemies attacks. In that situation, it could be easily explained as you attempt to dodge all of their shots, but due to the massive quantity of attacks being thrown at you, your attempt at getting out of the way only helped you dodge a few of the shots (equal to one attack). Also in a situation where you have a large number of guys points guns at you, it would be fair to say that they CANT dodge the shots, as there is simply to many shots, with no where to hide. As the GM you can determine when a player is allowed to do something and when they are not. If you come up with a situation where you can see no reason why the player would be able to do anything but dodge the bullets, then it makes total sense they should not be able to dodge, but that does not mean that there are not countless situations where they could still attempt it, at whatever modifier you wish to give them. As a GM, you have the power to describe the results how ever you want. A shot that is dodged does not have to have the character dodging the bullet. The bullet could simple miss from the start, or the shooter did not aim where you were going to be, or the shot hit armour. As long as the end description of the event results with the player taking the appropriate amount of damage or lack there of, the rules and rolls that got you there are of no importance. A player who rolls a 01 to hit someone with a gun didnt role a 01 to hit someone, they pulled of an amazing shot, quickly ending the heretical cultist life. That player which dodged 3 laser shots didn't dodge 3 beams of light, she narrowly managed to avoid getting hit when the foul eldar used its xeno tech against her, her armour smoking from where the shot almost took her life.
  13. Twillera

    Dodging bullets?!

    Dark heresy is not based of the table top game. It is based of the same universe that the table top exists in. Almost every rule in the table top is drastically different, and so comparing the two makes no sense. Both forms of combat, be it ranged or melee, use a totally different system for resolving the combat, as well as the psychic phase, interactions with cover, healing, taking damage, and countless other things. There is also a huge amount of things that are not in the tabletop which are in dark heresy, such as dodge, hiding (not counting simply being in cover), ammo, jumping and on and on. I have played the tabletop for years and can't think of a single rule in 40k which translates over to the RPG (maybe leadership? But if that were the case you would have to take a willpower test every time you lost a fight, and fear would impose a -30 to all tests, not the chart it uses). The two games use totally different systems for pretty much every single thing. Dark heresy is not inspired by the tabletop game, it is inspired by the warhammer 40000 universe, and the systems have no connection to each other.
  14. Twillera

    Dodging bullets?!

    As a gm, I have never had a problem with dodging, and my characters have never, ever, dodged a bullet. How you describe dodging is as important as any other description you, the gm, make. If you choose to say that dodging means that you dodge the bullet, that is fine, but there are countless other ways of describing the ability. Role playing is not an exact translation of the mechanics. If you, for example, make a move action and the fire a gun, you are not walking forward exactly three meters then stopping to shoot a single round. You are moving at a slow walking pace, approximately three meters every couple of seconds, while shooting your gun at a single shot rate, taking time to steady yourself in between. The same concept applies to dodging. If there is a scum with a autogun, and he takes a full round of shooting at you, hits you three times, and then you dodge two of the shots, this does not mean that only 3 of his shots would have hit, and you jumped out of the way of two of them. I would describe this as you seeing the scum take aim at you and you dive to try and get out of the way, he unloads his gun at you, but you role to safety before he can get a good line of sight on you, only one of the shots clipping you. Or perhaps several hit you, but because you made the effort to try and get out of the way, they only graze you, and while the total damage is the same, three shots hit, but each did less damage. Are they a tanky character? Perhaps they got hit by ALL the shots, but their armour was so great only a single round managed to hurt them, or the mass of fire did a bunch of blunt force damage equal to one attack. Maybe all they did was turn their body so that the bullets would hit a less vulnerable stop, or hit armour (covering your face with armoured hands instead of taking a bullet to the face) There are also a number of ways of describing why the shots would never have hit in the first place. You threw a grenade at them last turn? Instead of describing this as "you threw a grenade and did X damage. Now they shoot you and you dodge the shots" It could easily be described over the course of several rounds "The scum goes to shoot you, firing a spray of bullets at you, but before he can get to many off the grenade at his feet explodes, stopping him mid fire" in that case he only got off a single decent shot, which hit. A character who is good at dodging may not be able to actually dodge bullets, but instead has a very good sense of the battle field, knows how to use cover, and can keep an eye out for someone who looks like they are going to attack them. It is totally fair to state that there are situations where a character would have a harder time dodging, or not be able to dodge at all, but that doesn't mean they should never be able to react. If a character has got himself caught out in the open, sure I might impose a penalty to dodge, as it will be harder for him then if he was near cover. Going up against a whole line of guns? Absolutely he might not be able to dodge, as no matter what he or she does they will be moving into fire. If a group of people, or several people with high fire rate guns shoots at you, I might say that you don't get to choose which shot you dodge, as it would be way to hard to keep track. If you do dodge a shot, it would be randomly determined which you dodged, so you cant just say you will let the las guns hit and dodge the bolter (If you did want to try that, I would give all the lasguns bonuses to hit you as you are not even TRYING to dodge them). It is important to remember that you can describe any action in a multitude of ways, and the basic description of the action does not have to be what actually happens. Dodging can be any action which increases your survivability. An epic fail to hit could still actually hit, but just not do anything, an action prior to the turn could be responsible for the result. As A GM I have never had any problem with a character's ability to dodge, have always found that ranged is equally balanced, if not stronger (which it usually is), and have never had the impression of the game broken because a character attempted to get out of the way of someone shooting them. I have also never had anyone dodge bullets. (sorry if my argument is hard to follow, writing is not my strong point, I kinda just vomit whatever thought comes into my mind)
  15. Twillera

    Should I warn my players?

    One thing to remember, is that while it may have a crew 18000, they may not all even be human. Many could be mindless servitors who would walk right through a gun fight oblivious to what is going on, or be build into a machine, unable to even comprehend anything else.
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