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cpteveros

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  1. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Decessor in Milestones in DH2   
    Every 2500 XP you can Advance Specialize - either switch to a new, standard Specialty or take a new Advanced Specialty from the Hammer of the Emperor supplement. Alternatively, you can re-dedicate to your current Specialty for a +5 to any Characteristic. 
     
    On paper, it is a great way for a character to advance. In practice, however, it means merely that a character "makes the rounds" by picking up different Advanced Specialties and making advances cheap. For example, a Sergeant goes Sentry for cheap Perception and Ballistic Skill, then Brawler for cheap Agility and Weapon Skill, then perhaps to Commander for the Fellowship and Intelligence. 
     
    If you have a long campaign without a high incidence of player death, it can make it easy for someone to get to Space Marine- level Characteristics. 
  2. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Firebeard in Updated Character Sheet   
    There was a really good bare-bones character sheet posted on this forum last year, I believe. I would check it out, my table has been using it for a long time and we really like it. No graphics, no color, just very printer friendly.
  3. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Cogniczar in Homebrew Modules   
    I'm actually going to be launching a website soon with that very intention. 
  4. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Skarsnik38 in Why can't we just use a currency conversion chart? Guild Script to Bone Chips?   
    It comes down to how you want to play the game and what you'd like the focus to be. 
     
    I would far rather have the point of playing be to work as agents and investigators of an Inquisitor, than to worry about how much I can afford to shoot a Bolt pistol this month. You never see or hear Eisenhorn's Acolytes worrying about expense, why should we?
     
    If you have a group that really wants a monetary system, great. I don't think it would work well in mine and I'm glad that isn't the way the game is designed. 
  5. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Cogniczar in Homebrew Modules   
    So we've got Dark Pursuits, Forgotten Gods, the GM Screen adventure, and a bunch of adventure outlines for each homeworld. While that is a pretty good start as far as published adventures go, people will eventually run out of FFG material to play with.
     
    Meaning, you've got to start making your own.
     
    Maybe your group has been doing that this whole time, or maybe you've just used parts of the published adventures. I know my group has been doing the latter - so I decided to sit down and write a short adventure to help our GM get a feel for what DH2 looks like. 
     
    I am thinking of polishing it a bit, and posting it up here. Anyone else have ones they want to share? I think it would be a great way to see how everyone else plays, and involve the community a bit more.
  6. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Gridash in Homebrew Modules   
    So we've got Dark Pursuits, Forgotten Gods, the GM Screen adventure, and a bunch of adventure outlines for each homeworld. While that is a pretty good start as far as published adventures go, people will eventually run out of FFG material to play with.
     
    Meaning, you've got to start making your own.
     
    Maybe your group has been doing that this whole time, or maybe you've just used parts of the published adventures. I know my group has been doing the latter - so I decided to sit down and write a short adventure to help our GM get a feel for what DH2 looks like. 
     
    I am thinking of polishing it a bit, and posting it up here. Anyone else have ones they want to share? I think it would be a great way to see how everyone else plays, and involve the community a bit more.
  7. Like
    cpteveros reacted to NFK in Talents that did not make it into DH2   
    A number of them were marginal at best, such as the aforementioned Mimic and Heightened Senses. What's the point of making a separate talent as a rules permission to do something that's already likely covered under a skill or characteristic? Others just weren't worth it if you weren't using the old restrictive charts (OW Hotshot Pilot costs about the same as just buying the other two Operate skills at +0, and the extra DoS is of limited benefit), or weren't worth it in general (Decadence and Orthoproxy). And finally some needed notable consolidation (two-weapon talents and called shot talents among them) because no one in their right mind was going to only take one step in the chain instead of grabbing the whole set.
     
    Obviously a number of talents were cut for space, because the first priority for the new edition of DH was to make a cloak-and-dagger/investigation game in the 40K setting. But for every talent that was cut for space, I'll wager you that at least one other was also cut because it wasn't actually meaningful to characters.
  8. Like
    cpteveros reacted to GauntZero in Aren't the Enemies supplements a bit... lacking?   
    The only thing I am just missing so far, are some of the more regular weapon and equipment options that DH1's Inquisitors handbook had.
     
    So, not the Very Rare+ style of stuff you rarely see, but rather the more common guns & melee weapons, typical for the planets of askellon would be great. They could just be a Little different from the Standard weapons but give a lot more flavour to askellon.
  9. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Gridash in Ditching Dodge   
    No, I will not be advocating for the end to everyone's favorite broken skill (it is, indeed, broken). Instead, I propose a change to how it works.
     
    When somebody attempts to attack your character, and before they roll to hit, you declare that you will spend your Reaction to Dodge. You roll under your Dodge skill (Agility + whatever level Dodge you have), and tally up your Degrees of Success. For every DoS you made on your Dodge test, you impose a -5 penalty to their roll to hit. 
     
    What this does:
    1.) Nerfs the overpowered Dodge skill
    2.) Correctly represents a character being harder to hit, rather than doing the Matrix to dodge bullets. 
     
    Because it struck me as odd that somebody who is an incredible shot, aiming, and firing an accurate weapon (so, a +60) can roll an astounding success - and then have that snatched out of their hands by a Dodge roll after the fact. 
     
    So what do you guys think?
  10. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Jolly P in Why can't we just use a currency conversion chart? Guild Script to Bone Chips?   
    Heh, yeah. I won't disagree. On the other hand, if you consider the "non-lazy" approach, it should be a logistical nightmare. If it isn't, it's not modelling the complexities of the economic system adequately...if you take one short-cut, why aren't you stripping it back to the bare-bones, which is, essentially, what the Requisition system is? If you want to play stocks & shares, great. Who am I to stop you? If not and you want to get on with some DH, might as well skip the economics and get on with some shootin' and investigatin'.
     
     
    Presumptive, perhaps, yes. Though by the language being used by GauntZero and others, it seems to me that they are missing the point. I'm not saying they don't understand the "how" of the mechanic, but rather the "why" of it.
     
     
    Again, I won't disagree. The Requisition system is, as you say, little more than an expedient method of representing the economic systems, whatever they may be, in the game. That's the crux of it. In the 40k galaxy there are thousands upon millions of different economies, some will be based on fortunes of gold or land, others will be based on what someone looks like, others on social status or any number of different standards by which to distribute and account for whatever passes for wealth in a given system or on a given planet.
     
    So, your character comes along with 20 bars of gold. Good to buy a crate of lasguns on the last planet he was on. The local economy, however, is based not on material wealth but on social status. As an outsider, his social status is Zero, but he can buy his way up the ladder with material goods. How, then, do we go about translating his gold into status? Any ideas? Is it, in fact, worthwhile going through the rigmarole of translating Gold into Status, when the end result of him buying a crate of lasguns is the same? Is it not more expedient, more elegant (or lazy) and more to the point to use an abstract system of wealth that not only represents the characters physical wealth, but also his ability to call in favours, his personal charisma and ability to barter and any number of other factors that might come in to play?
     
    I wholeheartedly agree with your concluding statement. However you want to play the game is the most important thing. All I caution against is trying to achieve something that is not going to satisfy because the setting is so incredibly vast that the job of detailing the minutiae is too great and further, may even give rise to a fundamental change in the feel of the setting/game; from Dark Heresy to Merchants & Marauders.
  11. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Jolly P in Why can't we just use a currency conversion chart? Guild Script to Bone Chips?   
    So this (and some previous posters) is one of those examples where someone isn't "getting" the Requisition system.
     
    The question you need to ask is "Why is my character making a Requisition test?"
     
    - What's your game set-up? Are you a cadre of undercover agents, working behind the scenes to investigate a planet? Are you a hit-squad being used to take out key targets? Are you something else? This will determine the parameters of your "missions".
     
    - For game set-ups where you have regular contact with your Inquisitor (or his agents), your Inquisitor will be providing you with your "basics". He's not going to send you out without a clip of ammo between you, is he? For anything that is required for a mission, whether that be ammo, an auspex, a bionic leg or whatever...the GM should just give that to you at the start of the mission. You don't need to roll for it, you don't need to burn Influence or take a subtelty hit...the Inquisitor is just giving you this stuff before the mission starts. This is like the GM describing there being a key in a room; it's a thing that's there. You don't need to roll to pick up a key in front of you. Likewise, you don't need to roll to have things that are given to you.
     
    - On the other hand, however. Some game set-ups will mean that the players are free agents, working independently of their Inquisitor or his agents. In these games, your own resourcefulness is key and if you're not very resourceful (i.e. your Influence is low) then getting hold of what you consider "basics", like ammo and lasguns should actually be quite hard. PC basics, like weapons and armour, should often be restricted, illegal or noteworthy acquisitions in many places. Further, if you're keeping a low profile, then getting hold of gear that will make you stand out in a crowd is not something you should even be doing!
     
    - What does all this mean? In short, it means that whether you're character is focused on Requisition or not, then you still have to ask the questions "do I need to?" and further "should I?", not just "can I?".
     
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
    So, where does all this fall into the currency debate?
     
    The first question to ask is; what benefit does having a given monetary system give us?
    The second question to ask is: what are the drawbacks of having that monetary system?
    The third question is: do the benefits outweigh the drawbacks in terms of gameplay and immersion?
     
    If you think that giving every item a price, adjusting that price for local factors, having multiple currencies and fluctuating exchange rates and so on and so forth for all the details of a galaxy-spanning economic system is worth the effort, great! Go for it. Just don't be surprised when your players turn around and start playing Merchants & Marauders instead of Dark Heresy, as they traverse the galaxy stealing everything that's not nailed down in order to turn a profit so they can buy the next biggest gun/ship/whatever.
     
    If, however, you consider that the Requisition system accounts for all those variable economic factors by giving the GM the option of saying "that's a hard test here, -20" or another simple modifier to your test, whilst also discouraging the "take every lasgun" mentality, then you'll see that although it does have its loopholes, on the whole the Requisition system accounts for something that should be very complex in a remarkably elegant fashion.
  12. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Vorzakk in Why can't we just use a currency conversion chart? Guild Script to Bone Chips?   
    It was a really wonderful moment early on in my campaign when my most loot-happy player finally 'got' the Influence system and stopped trying to take every friggin' thing that wasn't bolted down (and a few that were).  
     
    I understand that many people don't like the system and I'm aware that it has its shortcomings, but I'm really glad that FFG decided to go in that direction.  
  13. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Bilateralrope in Why can't we just use a currency conversion chart? Guild Script to Bone Chips?   
    Because most currencies would be worthless on planets other than their planet of origin because they are only useful to people planning to head to the planet of origin. It simply wouldn't make any sense for currency conversion to happen at all.
     
     
    Mechanically, having players keep track of their currency encourages them to loot everything for sale. Players will strip every single piece of gear from dead enemies and sell it, because it all adds up to them buying the really expensive stuff. Some GMs don't like this loot everything mentality.
  14. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Bilateralrope in Enemy Beyond Expansion   
    A PC with the mutant background starts with 10 corruption.
    A psyker PC gets 1d10+3 corruption points the instant they take the elite advance, unless they are sanctioned.
     
     
    Yet the exorcized background comes with 0 cp. Stranger still is the malignancy, something that can only come from corruption that the exorcized PC lacks.
  15. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Commediante in You know you're playing Only War when   
    When your players go frenzy after you announce that gretchin scored Righteous Fury against one of them after rolling 10 damage, claming that Core Rulebook says that only Elite level NPC's can trigger it. After I read everything that there is on Rightous Fury in CRB I found out that it's actually the opposite - RAW strongly advise giving that rule to each and every adversary.
     
    So next thing I did was actually to upgrade all gretchins in the campaign to the elite force - I've gave them badass shades, chains of clippersover their necks and leather jackets and better melee armament.
     
    I hope this will satisfy my players
  16. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Magnus Grendel in What Would You Like to See Reworked?   
    Indeed. The Star Wars Edge of the Empire system works very well; boiling down to a second or so putting together the right 'dice pool' before rolling and a second or so cancelling results after rolling.
     
    Speeding up combat is important to me too. Yes, umpty-ump combat maneuvers give you tactics and flexibility, but at the moment the system dies a death from detail. I do not really care if I have a 50% or 55% chance of hitting....in the grand scheme of things it's not a big deal.
     
    Status tokens and cards do help a lot in this regard - putting it into perspective, we had a melee fight with four characters yesterday - two named NPCs and two PCs. It felt very slow and clunky when you have to work things out from first principle. Yes, all right, theoretically a PC should work out damage for each weapon in advance, but it'd be a lot faster if they didn't have to, and even then, things change a lot from combat conditions or whenever XP gets applied.
     
    Each round is
    Pick what you're going to do Work out what you need to roll to hit - in this example throwing in weapon quality, frenzy, hatred, standard attack, aim, defensive stance, target size Roll to hit Roll to parry/dodge Realise you've forgotten what you rolled to hit and try to remember to find the location hit Try to figure out the damage - with strength bonus again varying with frenzy, ws degrees-of-success changes to dice rolls, armour, pen value, toughness bonus, mighty blow (which provides damage bonus based on WS bonus which again varies with frenzy) Flick back and forth in the rulebook to find the critical tables because for some ****** reason they didn't put them on the GM screen Pass onto the next character to repeat. The problem is that it doesn't feel like the extra detail really does anything. Nothing feels missing from a gunfight or duel in Star Wars.
     
    I understand that you want the 'classic' 40k statlines - WS, BS, etc, with values that can trace their heritage to the tabletop (in this case more-or-less divide by ten) but the mechanics seem over the top.
     
    I'll be honest, in Only War, your comrade has the possible states of being of unwounded, wounded, and dead. For about 90% of NPCs, for about 90% of the time, that's enough detail.
     
    Making damage work of Degrees of success directly is a nice idea. To be honest, you could do a nice merger of the systems:
     
     
    Frankly for the sake of speed and focusing on the narrative, I can't see any reason you couldn't stick to a D10 rather than a D100; do you really need to have the option to have BS33 rather than BS30 to 'flesh out the character'? Awarding insanity or corruption a point at a time over a campaign makes a 0-100 scale useful, I'm not sure much else really requires it. Anyway, that's a personal thing. A check is a roll - much like it is now - aiming to roll less than your stat (plus or minus bonuses), so a higher stat is good. Each degree of success allows you to 'buy' effects - much like 'spending advantage' in star wars. So if I roll a 01 on a BS check and get 4 degrees of success, I can spend them on damage 4 times (Ka-Blam!) or spend some on, for example, hitting you in the gun arm specifically but do less damage, or on critical effects like stunning or causing blood loss. Armour reduces your degrees of success - and can reduce them to zero (because you've bounced off the armour). Toughness also reduces your degrees of success - but can't reduce them to zero. So essentially, if you've put a bullet through a weak spot in astartes power armour, you will do whatever wound one degree of success represents (a flesh wound of some kind, or maybe stunning for a turn) but no more - that way, as per old-style inquisitor, Toughness won't stop you getting hurt at all, but it will turn major injuries into minor ones. Weapons can still ignore armour or toughness based on traits, and may add extra degrees of success to your damage roll if you hit at all (rather than having a damage stat as now) - so that roll of 01 with a stub pistol will do 4 degrees of success, but if it had been a bolt round it might be increased to more like 6 - enough to both make the hit a focused shot to the gun hand and do enough damage to remove the extremity.  
    I'll be honest, I like Deathwatch as well as Dark Heresy, and the one 'new' setting I'd love to see is the Horus Heresy  as a 'new generation' version of Deathwatch - if it was done with the same art style and production values as the HH books, they'd be stunning, and there are dozens of ready-made campaign ideas in the background from the end of the Great Crusade to the start of the Heresy.
  17. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Adeptus-B in What Would You Like to See Reworked?   
    The biggest change that needs to be made is to speed up combat. Not really sure how to do that without a major re-write. One logical step would be to base damage off of Degrees of Success rather than a separate roll.
     
    And if we're talking major re-writes, I'd love to see Psychic Powers reformatted to be broad, mutable effects, like they are depicted in the fluff, rather than narrowly defined D&D-style 'spells'.
  18. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Egyptoid in Rogue Trader in Askellon   
    There are like six Rogue Trader books all set in the Koronus Expanse, with locations/people/ships described in detail. The reason I like the idea of Askellon is that there is nothing, not even mention of what xenos are out there. 
     
    I know that the Koronus Expanse is not developed, and there is quite a bit of blank space - but the parts filled in are concrete, meaning something I would feel obligated to work around. It's the same thing with the Calixis Sector - there have been at least a dozen full books of plot hooks and descriptions of the most interesting places/people/things in that sector. 
     
    Askellon has been criticized for feeling empty, smaller, and less defined. While that may bother others, it feels like an opportunity to me. 
  19. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Errant Knight in Rogue Trader in Askellon   
    I'd suggest that if you're looking for that empty but unexplored feeling, just draw something up.  In the end, though, you'll either draw up a sandbox or you'll draw up a series of loosely connected mini-campaigns that span a wide bit of space.  It doesn't really matter, in my opinion, what setting is used.  The key is keeping your players on-track for your self-generated endeavors, which usually involves inciting their greed; then having enough sidetracks left unexplored that your players begin suggesting endeavors of their own.  They'll have fun exploring your creations, but they'll fall in love chasing their own goals.
  20. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Gaius Iago Urbanus in The Dark Heresy Requisition System   
    The problem is with your group's loot mentality, not the mechanics of the game. Influence works for acquiring services, paying bribes, and getting ammunition in a place you're unfamiliar with. 
     
    It breaks down when you try to use it to loot, steal, and sell everything that isn't bolted down. These are Inquisitorial Acolytes, they've got better things to do than shopping sprees. The armory isn't that extensive in the first place, so I don't know how they could even spend an entire session buying things!
     
    "But they are just regular guys!" You might say. "They don't have access to the resources of the Inquisition!"
     
    Neither do I, and I'm a regular guy - but you don't see me looting dead bodies to pawn everything they own. That simply isn't normal behavior, both in real life or in WH40k. 
  21. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Radwraith in The Dark Heresy Requisition System   
    I think you may be missing some important elements of the Influence system. The first has to do with who the Acolytes actually are! Remember that Acolytes are essentially regular people who don't have the wealth of a Rogue trader or Inquisitor themselves. Especially in the beginning! Let's consider your example of Flak Armor; a Flak vest has an availability of Average which means your average starting character has about a 30% chance of picking one up with no modifiers. Seem too low? Consider this: IRL a Kevlar vest will run you $500.00 or more! How many of us carry around that kind of money in Cash? Further, Body armor is not normally sold in your local sport's equipment store. It's usually a catalogue order item. Now add to that the fact that most times, Acolytes are not in their hometown or even on their Homeworld! Suppose you live in the USA and you travel to europe. Once there, you decide you need a new set of body armor. Would you even know where to look?
     
    The second part of this that your missing is the commerce skill. The modifier for a successful commerce roll is +10 per (opposed) DOS! This can put you into some hefty modifiers! Add to that the modifiers for dealing with a merchant you know and it gets a lot easier! 
     
    The reason I mention this is that I see this complaint often. I find that often people complaining about the RAW are not using the RAW! There are certainly things I would Handwave. IE: Your Acolyte has an Imperial guard background and wishes to exchange discharged lasgun mags for new ones at the local base..Sure! I'm not gonna make you roll for that! I personally also like to add the modifiers from the original DH1 Ascension. That probably the only part of that book I found useful!
  22. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in Inquest Help (Enemies Within)   
    The way I read that section of Enemies Within made it seem like it was an Investigation-themed Endeavor from Rogue Trader. Something that the players start/come up with, not necessarily the GM. 
  23. Like
    cpteveros reacted to javcs in wrongfully executed form   
    So, you believe that you have been wrongfully executed by your Commissar, do you?
     
    (1) If you're complaining about it, you clearly either (a) haven't been executed, or (b) the execution didn't stick, in which case, you're a witch/daemon/xenos/heresy/etc, and therefore are in need of a more ... thorough ... execution by the Commissar, and the rest of your unit needs to be thoroughly investigated by the Commissariat, and possibly the Inquisition as well, for contamination/taint, if not subjected to mass summary executions "just to be safe".
     
    (2) Questioning the disciplinary decisions of your Commissar? That's Gross Insubordination, if not Incitement to Mutiny - and Incitement to Mutiny carries a death sentence, and often the trial stage gets carried out only retroactively, when the Commissar is filling out the paperwork on the executions and investigations and subsequent executions.
     
     
    --
     
    At best, you can hope your buddies will frag the Commissar when the opportunity presents itself to avenge you (or keep themselves of the firing line).
  24. Like
    cpteveros got a reaction from eltom13 in Enemy Without Expansion   
    The interesting thing about "Imperial Space" is that it isn't contiguous. While easier to present on a map, the empty space between planets and warp routes isn't necessarily empty - it may contain whole alien empires that the Imperium has no way of reaching, as there aren't stable warp routes to those stars. It is better to think of the territory the Imperium controls as almost a rail network. You know of and can visit any of the cities connected by rail, but there could be whole countries you just pass through you'd never know about. 
  25. Like
    cpteveros reacted to Vorzakk in Imperial Knight pilots as PCs?   
    One of my players had been contemplating playing a freelance Knight who'd lost his mecha, but he ended up going in another direction.  If he decides to revisit that concept; I'd just recommend that he go Highborn / Outcast / Ace, and trade in a couple of equipment choices for a Mind Impulse Unit. 
     
    As for plugging into other vehicles, I'd limit it to what anyone else could do with an MIU.  
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